Skip to main content

Full text of "Town Report"

See other formats


9 ^/-.^_ r ^-zr. : .._ 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY. MASS. 



3 4864 00178 7398 




*'& -^pi-j 



Hincoln public Htbrarp 



January 1978 






h* 



REPORT 

of the 

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 

of the 

TOWN OF LINCOLN 



FOR THE YEAR 1975 




LINCOLN, MASSACHUSETTS 



We are grateful to Minute Man 
Publications for permission to 
use portions of staff photographs 
in the cover design, and to 
Bonnie Jean Mohr for permission 
to reproduce a snapshot of George 
Wells, taken July 4, 1975 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



TOWN CALENDAR 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Board of Selectmen 1 

Officers and Committees 6 

Town Clerk 19 

FINANCE 

Financial Manager 37 

Town Treasurer 38 

Town Accountant 43 

Board of Assessors 57 

Collector of Taxes 59 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

Fire $ Police Department 61 

Civil Defense and Disaster Preparedness 65 

Inspectors of Building, Wiring $ Plumbing 67 

HEALTH AND WELFARE 

Board of Health .. 69 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS 

Planning Board 73 

Board of Appeals 76 

Conservation Commission 77 

Lincoln Land Conservation Trust 80 

Tree Warden 82 

Public Works Department 83 

Water Commissioners 85 

Cemetery Commissioners 88 

Celebration Committee 89 

Lincoln 1975 Bicentennial Commission 91 

Lincoln Historical Commission 93 
Minute Man National Historical Park 

Advisory Commission 95 



Page 

PLANNING AND PUBLIC WORKS (Continued) 

Codman Community Farms, Inc. 98 

SCHOOLS, LIBRARY AND RECREATION 

Lincoln Public Library 102 

DeCordova and Dana Museum and Park 106 

Recreation Committee 111 

Elementary Schools 112 

Lincoln-Sudbury Regional School District 121 

Student Exchange Committee 142 
Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical 

School District 145 

VITAL STATISTICS 

Vital Statistics 154 

Valuation List 161 

Commissioners of Trust Funds 194 



SELECTMEN 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 
BOARD OF HEALTH 
BOARD OF APPEALS 
PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

POPULATION 
TOWN AREA 
1975-76 TAX RATE 
ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

ANNUAL ELECTION OF 
OFFICERS 

QUALIFICATIONS FOR 
REGISTRATION 

REGISTERED VOTERS 

TOWN OFFICES 



TOWN CALENDAR 

-- Every Monday of each month, 7:30 p. in 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

— First and third Mondays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m., Superintendent's 
Office, 259-9400 

-- For appointments call Town Hall, 
259-8850 

-- Meetings by appointment 

-- Meetings by appointment 

— Call Town Hall, 259-8850 

— Every other Wednesday, 8:00 p.m., 
Town Hall, 259-8850 

-- First and third Wednesdays of each 
month, 8:00 p.m., Town Hall, 
259-8850 

— 4,917 (Town Census) 
-- 14.56 square miles 

— $63.50 per $1,000 valuation 

-- Saturday before the last Monday in 
March - March 27, 1976 



Last Monday in March - March 29, 19! 

Residence in Town of Lincoln 

2,880 (As of March, 1975) 

Open Monday through Friday, 8:30 p.i 
to 4:30 p.m. Closed on Saturdays. 



General Government 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert M. Gargill 

John B. Garrison 

Harold A. Levey, Jr., Chairman 



In 1975 and for the past few years, Lincoln has maintained a 
relatively low effective real estate tax rate (after adjustment to 
fair market assessment). This condition has been attainable only 
as the result of limited increases in Town services, maintenance 
of high levels of state reimbursement and the ability of the Town 
to identify additional sources of revenue. As 1975 progressed, 
however, we witnessed pressures that portend substantial tax in- 
creases in the future. 

County and MBTA assessments are increasing dramatically and 
State contributions are likely to decrease dramatically. Here at 
home we see demands for better fire coverage, an additional new en- 
gine, extra tennis courts, a town-owned ambulance, a new and costly 
transfer station for refuse disposal, increased effort to reduce 
dog problems, major water system improvements to solve our water 
problems of the past years, and a new state imposed building code 
that has skyrocketed the level of effort that must be expended by 
our building department. While considered singly, some of these 
initiatives have merit, they collectively have a dramatic cost im- 
pact oh town operations. Statistics indicate that the purchasing 
power of the average American is no higher than in 1967 and, indeed, 
it has actually declined by 5% since 1972. While our tax rate has 
over the past five years increased less than the cost of living, 
these conditions should cause each of us to question carefully our 
need for every additional increment of town service. 

In 1975 we continued our efforts to assure that Town services 
are provided efficiently and in a manner consistent with the needs 
and character of the Town. In coming to grips with some basic 
problems, we experienced, as might be expected, some difficulty and 
a certain amount of controversy. Notwithstanding that, much pro- 
gress was made in resolving the problems and providing a firm basis 
for productive and responsive operations. Generally, salaries 
paid to Town employees are as high or higher than salaries for com- 



parable positions in many similarly situated towns. Accordingly, 
even though many Town employees live outside the Town, citizens 
should feel no embarrassment in expecting high standards of ser- 
vice. 

Perhaps the most far reaching development in the Police Depart- 
ment is the planned departure from the strict seniority system 
which traditionally served as the basis for making duty assignments. 
As a result of a cooperative effort among Dan Maclnnis and senior 
officers, rotation of schedules and functions will soon be insti- 
tuted. We believe these changes will stimulate an improvement in 
morale, productivity and the quality of police services. This 
change did not draw as much publicity as our decision not to re- 
appoint a police officer when his annual term of office expired. 
Such decisions are made infrequently and never lightly. That the 
Town's civil authority has, under applicable law, the right and res- 
ponsibility to make such a decision, is, we believe, critical to 
maintaining a standard of service consistent with the needs and 
rights of the Town's citizens. 

Early last year we embarked on a comprehensive review of our 
Fire Department. A consultant was hired to review its operations 
and make appropriate recommendations on organization, manning and 
operations. This review has to date resulted in the appointment 
of a new deputy chief and fire fighter and further training of per- 
sonnel. We believe that the Town will continue to remain heavily 
dependent upon its Call Firemen to maintain fire fighting capabili- 
ties. Continued attention must be given to enhancing the call 
organization and achieving better integration with full-time fire 
fighters. With the help of our consultant and our Public Safety 
Board, we expect progress to be made along these lines. 

As previously noted, the continued pressure for additional 
equipment is of concern to us. In the past two years, substantial' 
sums have been invested in fire fighting equipment. While we res- 
pect the sincerity of those who insist on additional equipment, we 
doubt that an increased inventory will provide a significant incre- 
ment of safety and we doubt that the additional cost can now be just 
ified. 

The past year has seen an improvement in the operations and 
productivity of the Public Works Department. Further improvement 
is needed in the level and quality of support services needed from 
this department by the Conservation, Cemetery and Recreation Com- 
missions. We are hopeful that better planning and scheduling of 
the work on public lands will result in much better service. We 



expect that in the future greater emphasis will be placed on repair, 
maintenance and Town beautification than on straight construction. 

A significant change that will characterize the ensuing year 
will be Warren Flint's retirement as Executive Secretary and his 
taking on a major role in the management of the Town's land use pro- 
grams and as adviser to the Board and the new Executive Secretary. 

We are deeply grateful for the years of service that Warren 
Flint has given to the Town. His sensitivity to the philosophy of 
the Town, and his dedication to the preservation of our way of life 
have endeared him to all of us and we appreciate those qualities in 
Warren that have been so instrumental in guiding us and forming Town 
policies. We are fortunate, therefore, that Warren has consented 
to continue to serve the Town as a consultant in those areas where 
his expertise is virtually irreplaceable. In this regard, he will 
develop and recommend to the Board of Selectmen and the Conservation 
Commission programs for the use, maintenance and upgrading of Town 
lands and will work with the Executive Secretary in the implementa- 
tion of such programs. He will develop and recommend to the Ceme- 
tery Commissioners a program for maintenance and administration of 
the Town cemeteries, assist the Cemetery Commissioners in the admin- 
istration of cemeteries and work with the Executive Secretary to 
assure that cemetery programs and policies are being properly imple- 
mented. He will serve as liaison between Town boards and com- 
missions on the one hand and the Rural Land Foundation and Land Con- 
servation Trust on the other. He will continue to assist the 
Board of Selectmen in the implementation of such special projects 
as the Codman barns and Garland cabin. He will advise us with res- 
pect to water policies and programs and the implementation thereof. 
Finally, he will be available to act as counsel and adviser to the 
new Executive Secretary and to the Board of Selectmen on matters of 
policy and concern. 

Tim Grobleski will succeed Warren as Executive Secretary on 
March 1, 1976. Tim now lives in Lincoln and has become increasing- 
ly sensitive to the ideas and desires of its citizens. Tim knows 
how much we all expect of him and we are confident that he will have 
the cooperation of all citizens in his efforts to meet the challenge 
of his new job. 

Finally, we wish to express our further gratitude and esteem 
for Fred Taylor whose 30-year long and able service to the Town came 
to an end with his retirement last year. Fred's keen insight into 
the Town's financial affairs and other issues will be sorely missed, 
but we look forward to his continued participation at Town Meetings 



as an informed citizen and to his wry wit on the issues of concern. 

Many occurrences of the past year tend to impact the Town's 
character. Traffic problems at the railroad station and in the 
vicinity of the DeCordova Museum, the intersection of Sandy Pond 
Road at the center, and Lincoln Road at Tower Road, must be re- 
solved. The moderate income housing and new commercial area, 
coupled with potential new subdivisions, pose the threat of traffic 
problems in the future. The ability of the Town's existing road 
system to carry traffic and the avoidance of congestion must be re- 
garded as important factors in the consideration of any "growth 
policy". 

Use of Pierce Park and our conservation areas pose additional 
problems. Such problems seem to lead inevitably to more and more 
regulations, which are anathema to Town boards as well as the citi- 
zens of the Town. We will present to Town Meeting a proposal to 
fund summer patrols of public lands. 

In a less serious vein, the state-mandated division of Lincoln 
into two precincts, our decision to switch to computer card ballots, 
and the petition to mandate the assignment of street numbers to all 
buildings, are indicative of the forces for change that are now at 
work. Despite the pressures for change, Town boards are contin- 
uing their commitment to the preservation of open space and the 
quality of natural beauty which characterize the Town. The Con- 
servation Commission this year completed its open space plan and is 
making available at Town Hall maps fully delineating this plan. 
Also, our conservationist has prepared a tree-planting program which 
will be presented for implementation beginning mid-1976. 

The greatest desire of this Board has always been to provide a 
citizen-oriented, person-centered administration. We continue to 
do this by encouraging initiatives which will achieve this end. 
Last year's Fourth of July celebration, which was skillfully engin- 
eered by the Celebration Committee and assisted by the Grange and 
other groups, provided a program which clearly brought citizens to- 
gether in a more intimate, social interchange. We have consistent- 
ly encouraged a citizen group to hire a youth officer and have worked 
with them to provide funding for this program, which has now come to 
fruition. At the other end of the spectrum, we have initiated a 
program to have Lincoln join the Home Care Corporation and set up a 
Council on Aging. Except for the activities of our local churches, 
the Town has not been sufficiently active in providing services for 
our youth and our older citizens. 



In considering the character of our Town, we must express deep 
regret for the passing of those who have significantly influenced 
our experience over the past few years. The first of these was 
our beloved Clerk, George Wells. None of us can fail to recognize 
George's abiding love for his fellow man. A person of profound 
character and selfless dedication to fulfilling the human potential 
of every person in need that he met, George will be sorely missed 
and gratefully remembered by all who knew him. 

While not a citizen of Lincoln, few of us are unaware of the 
generous contributions Ben Fawcett made to the Town of Lincoln on 
behalf of the Dorothy Codman Trust. As a trustee, Ben, with his 
co-trustee Roger Tyler, took great interest in all of the activities 
of our Town and generously met both Town-wide needs and needs of 
individual citizens from the Trust. 

Having written this report, we must now reopen it to record 
with shock and grief the death, on February 19, 1976, of Dan Maclnnis, 
our Chief. Fore more than twenty years he served the Town with the 
utmost devotion and a great sensitivity to the needs of all its citi- 
zens. He brought to the resolution of difficult problems great 
professional skill and compassion. Like George, he provides us 
with a continuing model of service for which we are thankful. 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 



MODERATOR 

Kenneth W. Bergen 1978 

TOWN CLERK 

George Wells (deceased) 1976 

Elizabeth J. Snelling (appointed) 1976 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Robert M. Gargill 1976 

John B. Garrison 1977 

Harold A. Levey, Jr., Chairman 1978 

TOWN TREASURER 

Richard Wengren 1976 

BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

Joseph W. Howard 1976 

J. Thomas Franklin 1977 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 1978 

COLLECTOR OF TAXES 

Richard Wengren 1977 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. William Adams ~ 1977 

Muriel Weckstein 1977 

Lynn Donaldson 1978 

Priscilla Damon 1978 

Robert Frank, Chairman 1976 

WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Thomas Norton (resigned) 1976 

Frederick M. Tingley (appointed) 1976 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 1977 

Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 1978 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

Herbert A. Haessler, M. D. 1977 

Joan M. Comstock 1978 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D., Chairman 1976 



Term Expires 



REGIONAL DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



Richard 
Henry M, 



William 
Joan W. 



H. Davison 
Morgan 
Cameron H. Eiseman 
David M. Ford 

T. Maloney 

Wofford, Chairman 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 



H. Arnold MacLean 

Vincent N. Merrill 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 



PLANNING BOARD 



David M. Donaldson 

Robert C. Brannen 

James D. Birkett 

Ann P. Brown 

Susan M. Brooks, Chairman 



MEASURER OF WOOD AND BARK 



Frederick B. Taylor 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 



Archer desCognets 
Richard F. Schroeder 
William B. Russell 



1977 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1976 
1976 



1976 
1978 
1977 



1976 
1977 
1979 
1980 
1978 



1976 



1976 
1977 
1978 



Nancy B. Ellis 
Rebecca B. Bailey 
Thomas B. Adams 



TRUSTEES OF BEMIS FUND 



1976 
1977 
1978 



TRUSTEES OF LINCOLN LIBRARY 



Francis H. Gleason, Chairman 
Thomas B. Adams 
Martha DeNormandie 



Molly K. Turner 
R. John Hughes 
Katherine S. Bolt 



(School Committee Appointee) 
(Selectmen Appointee) 
(Elected by the Town) 



Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 
Life Trustee 

1976 
1978 
1977 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 



'A" Directors 



Term Expires 



John Pike 
Francis S. Andrews 
Walter J. Salmon 
Gregory Kolligian 



1978 
1977 
1976 
1979 



"B" Directors 



Janet B. Daniels, President 
Chester d'Autremont, M. D. 
Robert B. Newman 



(School Committee Appointee) 1977 

(Library Trustees Appointee) 1976 

(Selectmen Appointee) 1978 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 



Henry Had ley, Chairman 
Roberta Spreadbury 
Leo J. Algeo 



(Elected by Town) 1977 
(Elected by Town) 1976 
(Elected by Town) 1978 



Enid Beal 
Virginia Niles 
C. Lee Todd 



(Selectmen Appointee) 1977 
(Selectmen Appointee) 1976 
(Selectmen Appointee) 1978 



TREE WARDEN 



Russell L. Barnes 



1976 



OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES 
APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Warren F. Flint 



EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 



1976 



J. Timothy Grobleski 



FINANCIAL MANAGER 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 



Lois McClure Light (Resigned) 
Betty L. Lang (Appointed) 



1976 



1976 
1976 



Term Expires 



CLERK OF SELECTMEN 



Elizabeth J. Snelling 1976 

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 
Richard P. Carroll 1976 

CHIEF OF POLICE 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1976 

DEPUTY CHIEF OF POLICE 
Charles E. Doyle 1976 

POLICE SERGEANT 
David Davis 1976 

PATROLMAN-INSPECTOR 
Steven Ziegler 1976 

POLICE OFFICERS 

James Blackburn 1976 

David Finan 1976 

John Fitzgerald 1976 

Richard Hallett 1976 

Thomas Moran 1976 

CONSTABLES 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1976 

Charles E. Doyle 1976 

SPECIAL CONSTABLE 
William F. Egar (Deceased) 1976 

Steven Ziegler (Appointed) 1976 

DOG OFFICER 
William Desjean 1976 

FIRE CHIEF 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1976 

PETROLEUM INSPECTOR 
Thomas W. Coan 1976 

FOREST WARDEN 
Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 1976 



BUILDING INSPECTOR 
Ernest L. Johnson 1976 

WIRING INSPECTOR 
William M. Dean 1976 

PLUMBING INSPECTOR 
Daniel J. Murphy (Resigned) 1976 

Russell J. Dixon (Appointed) 1976 

DIRECTOR OF CIVIL DEFENSE 



AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 




Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr. 


1976 


DEPUTY DIRECTORS OF CIVIL DEFENSE 




AND EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 




Ernest L. Johnson 


1976 


Eveleth R. Todd 


1976 


COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER 





Lawrence Hallett (Resigned) 1976 

Eric Williams (Appointed) 1976 

FENCE VIEWERS 

John B. French 1976 

Richard C. Reece 1976 

VETERANS' AGENT 

William B. Whalen 1976 

VETERANS' GRAVE OFFICER 

William B. Whalen 1976 

TOWN COUNSEL 

William N. Swift 1976 

TOWN HISTORIAN 

Margaret M. Martin 1976 

REGISTRARS OF VOTERS 

Peggy G. Elliott 1977 

William G. Langton 1976 

Harold E. Lawson 1978 

George Wells, ex officio (Deceased) 1976 

Elizabeth J. Snelling, ex officio 1976 



10 



Term Expires 



REPRESENTATIVE TO MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 



Henry Spencer 



AIRPORT COMMUNITY COUNCIL 



Frederic J. Eppling 
Gregory Kolligian 
Harold E. Lawson 
L. Dennis Shapiro 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 



Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 

John Quincy Adams 

James DeNormandie 

William M. Preston 

Lydia Dane 

Ronald Marcks 

Kemon P. Taschioglou 



NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMITTEE 



Katharine S. White 
James DeNormandie 



(Appointee of Selectmen) 
(Appointee of Governor) 



BOARD OF APPEALS 



Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 
Peter Meenan 
Barbara Barker 
Robert W. Jevon ' 
Hans vanLeer 



ASSOCIATE MEMBERS, BOARD OF APPEALS 



Alice Pickman 
David Sykes 



1976 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



1977 
1976 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1978 



1976 



1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 



1976 
1978 



REPRESENTATIVE TO METROPOLITAN AREA PLANNING COUNCIL 
David M. Donaldson 1977 

REPRESENTATIVES TO SUBREGION INTERTOWN LIAISON COMMITTEE 

1976 
1976 



R. Langdon Wales 
James M. Spindler 



REPRESENTATIVE TO GOVERNOR'S TASK FORCE ON HANSCOM FIELD 
R. Langdon Wales 1976 

REPRESENTATIVE ON WALDEN POND BOARD OF DIRECTORS 



John Quincy Adams 



1976 



11 



Term Expires 



REPRESENTATIVES TO REGIONAL WASTE DISPOSAL PLANNING BOARD 



Ruth Ann Hendrickson 
Henry F. Harrison 
Fred Silverstein 



1976 
1976 
1976 



REPRESENTATIVE ON MIDDLESEX COUNTY ADVISORY BOARD 



John B. Garrison 



1976 



LINCOLN 1975 BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 



John W. Carman, Chairman 

Katharine S. White, Vice Chairman 

Saville R. Davis 

Margaret Flint 

Stanley Heck 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

Julie S. Pugh 

Harriet Rogers 

Sumner Smith 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Margaret Wengren 

Margaret M. Martin, ex officio 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 



Ruth Wales, Chairman 

John Quincy Adams 

Astrid Donaldson 

John Todd 

Curtis Chapin (Resigned) 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 



Julie S. Pugh, Chairman 
Donna Burt 
Nils Touborg 
David Manion 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



1976 
1977 
1977 
1976 
1978 



1976 
1977 
1976 
1978 



Owen Beenhouwer 
Ruth K. Hap good 
John R. Snelling 



PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD 



1976 
1976 
1976 



12 



Term Expires 



Abigail Cheever 
James Barnet 
Stephen Coan 
John Stevenson 



PUBLIC SAFETY BOARD 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



RELOCATION COMMITTEE 
George Kornfeld, Chairman 
Carol Elwood 
Eleanor Fitzgerald 
Guido Perera 
Elmer H. Ziegler 

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMITTEE 
Kate S. Culver, Chairman 
Cecilia Ives 
John Ritsher 
Paul Ross 
Lex H. Taylor 



Henry Hadley, Chairman 
Ann E. Paddock 
Virginia O'Brien 
Albert Reed 
Mary Terrell 
Kay Yeuell 



SWIMMING POOL COMMITTEE 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



TENANT SELECTION COMMITTEE 



Leo J. Algeo 
Stephen Coan 
Robert Fraser 
Alice E. Garrison 
Mary Hester 
Emanuel Maier 
Dilla Tingley 



John Quincy Adams 
Leo J. Algeo 
Raymond Barnes 
Russell L. Barnes 
Robert H. Booth 
Allen Bowles 
Joseph Bozak 



SPECIAL POLICE 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



13 



SPECIAL POLICE (Continued) 




Floriy Campobasso 


1976 


Joseph Campobasso 


1976 


Richard P. Carroll 


1976 


Edward Chisholm 


1976 


Stephen Coan 


1976 


Arthur Cotoni 


1976 


Lorraine Dean (Matron) 


1976 


William M. Dean 


1976 


James DeNormandie 


1976 


William Desjean 


1976 


William R. Doherty 


1976 


Lloyd A. Douty 


1976 


John J. Doyle 


1976 


James Finnerty 


1976 


Warren F. Flint 


1976 


Andrew D. Frazier, Jr. 


1976 


Robert M. Gargill 


1976 


John B. Garrison 


1976 


Richard Goddard 


1976 


Elliott V. Grabill 


1976 


Lawrence P. Hallett 


1976 


Frank Hidinger 


1976 


Richard Hodgson 


1976 


George J. Hofferty 


1976 


Christopher Ireland, Jr. 


1976 


Ernest L. Johnson 


1976 


William T. King 


1976 


Harry B. Knowles, III 


1976 


Harold E. Lawson 


1976 


Robert A. Lemire 


1976 


Harold A. Levey, Jr. 


1976 


Joseph Lenox 


1976 


Hazel A. Maclnnis (Matron) 


1976 


Henry Manuel 


1976 


Paul McGovern 


1976 


Thomas E. Moreau 


1976 


Paul V. Moynihan 


1976 


Mary Murphy (Matron) 


1976 


John O'Loughlin 


1976 


William M. Preston 


1976 


Frank Putnam 


1976 


E. Donlan Rooney 


1976 


William C. Ryan 


1976 


Sumner Smith 


1976 



14 



Alanson H 
Kemon P. Taschioglou 
George Thomas 
Walter Van Wart 
Henry Warner 
William B. Whalen 
William B. Whalen, Jr. 
Susan Ziegler 



SPECIAL POLICE (Continued) 
Sturgis, Jr. 



Term Expires 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 



JURY LIST 



Name 

Adams, John 
Allen, Mark C. 
Andrews, Dorothy J. 
Barkas, Christopher W. 
Belle, Eileen 
Bergen, Emily F. 
Birmingham, James G. 
Chaney, Katherine Ann 
Collins, Edward C, II 
Corcoran, Robert P. 
Crandall, Patricia E. 
Cunningham, Robert M. 
Darling, Oscar L. 
DeNormandie, Martha 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Donald, Aida D. 
Drew, Frederic T. 
Drop, Edward S. 
Faran, Ellen G. 
Felegian, Peter 
Flint, Peter S. 
Fortin, Michael L. 
Gajewski, Ceslaus A. 
Goldstein, Martin 
Grason, Rufus LeRoy 
Gregory, Mary 
Haggerty, John S. 
Harris, Kevin E. 
Hay t ay an, Harry M. 
Healey, Harry R., Jr. 
Henderson, Robert S. 



Address 

Concord Road 
Baker Bridge Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Bypass Road 
Brooks Road 
Mackintosh Lane 
Todd Pond Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Todd Pond Road 
Old Winter Street 
Tabor Hill Road 
Rockwood Lane 
Trapelo Road 
Trapelo Road 
Old Farm Road 
Lincoln Road 
Concord Road 
South Great Road 
Tabor Hill Road 
Sunny side Lane 
Lexington Road 
Virginia Road 
Bedford Lane 
Tower Road 
Bedford Road 
Weston Road 
Partridge Lane 
Ridge Road 
Sunnyside Lane 
Weston Road 
Giles Road 



Occupation 

Engineer 

Photographer 

Housewife 

Sales Manager 

Accountant 

Housewife 

Stockbroker 

Secretary 

Architect 

Ins. Sales 

Housewife 

Meterology 

Investments 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Editor 

Antique Dealer 

Carpenter 

Housewife 

Dry Cleaner 

Tech. Illus. 

Park Appraiser 

Methods Planner 

Alcoh. Counsel. 

Parts Coord. 

Woodworker 

Scientist 

Maint. Eng. 

Engineer 

Retired 

Engineer 



15 



Name 



JURY LIST (Continued) 
Address 



Herman, Emily R. 
Hester, Leon B. 
Hill, Craig C. 
Hyde, Benjamin D. 
John, Morley M. 
Kaplan, Leonard J. 
Kennedy, Joan M. 
Kerrebrock, Bernice M. 
Lane, Kathleen F. 
Leslie, Bernard A. 
Lewis, William R. 
Loewenstein, Paul 
Loughlin, Leona K. 
Lustwerk, I. J. Theodora 
Madio, Frederick R. 
Manzelli, Donald M. 
Manzer, Deward F. 
Martin, Margaret M. 
McClennen, Louise H. 
McKennan, Alice W. 
Meade, Edmund J. 
Merrill, Vincent N. 
Morency, Alfred J. 
Mukhitarian, Stephanie 
Nardone, Anthony B. 
O'Brien, Daniel F. 
O'Reilly, Joseph J. 
Paine, Mary C. 
Panetta, Frank 
Parke, Nathan G., IV 
Parsons, Robert T. 
Pickman, Anthony P. 
Podsen, Robert E. 
Risch, Martin D. 
Scheff, Benson H. 
Smith, Alan B. 
Smyth, Robert R. 
Solman, Fred J., Ill 
Torti, Maurice L., Jr. 
Vockel, Virginia 
Von Mertens, Peter B. 
Walker, Sidney Anne 
Whitman, Ross 



Silver Hill Road 
Bedford Road 
Winter Street 
Tower Road 
Old Concord Road 
Sunnyside Lane 
Ridge Road 
Tower Road 
Deer Run 

Cambridge Turnpike 
Linway Road 
Laurel Drive 
Old Bedford Road 
Page Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Meadowbrook Road 
Page Road 
South Great Road 
Silver Hill Road 
Old Concord Road 
Old Sudbury Road 
Old County Road 
Concord Road 
Tower Road 
Goose Pond Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
Lincoln Road 
Wil larch Road 
Cambridge Turnpike 
South Great Road 
Pierce Hill Road 
Concord Road 
Todd Pond Road 
Winter Street 
Concord Road 
Stonehedge 
Mornings ide Lane 
Ridge Road 
Weston Road 
Bedford Road 
Tower Road 
Baker Bridge Road 
Wheeler Road 



16 



Occupation 

Sales 

Engineer 

Self Employed 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Secretary 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Engineer 

Salesman 

Metalurgist 

Library Asst. 

Housewife 

Engineer 

Gen. Contract 

Prod. Plan. 

Housewife 

Housewife 

Teacher 

Supervisor 

Ldsc. Arch. 

Physicist 

Operator 

Sales Eng. 

Sales Rep. 

Salesman 

Res. Tech. 

Self Employed!! 

Engineer 

Business 

Bus. Cons. 

Executive 

Bus. Exec. 

Manager 

Physicist 

Engineer 

Engineer 

Scientist 

Ind. Pscho. 

Explorer 

Housewife 

Chemist 



JURY LIST (Continued) 

Name Address Occupation 

Winship, Lee C. Brooks Road Consultant 

Wood, Robert M. Deerhaven Road Manager 

Worsham, Jack L. Sandy Pond Road Sales Eng. 

APPOINTED BY THE TOWN CLERK 



ASSISTANT TOWN CLERKS 



Term Expires 



Roberta M. Page 1976 

Elizabeth J. Snelling 1976 



APPOINTED BY THE TREASURER 

ASSISTANTS TO THE TREASURER 
Madge K. Fisher 1976 

Virginia M. Niles 1976 

APPOINTED BY THE TAX COLLECTOR 

ASSISTANTS TO THE TAX COLLECTOR 
Madge K. Fisher ~" 1976 

Virginia M. Niles 1976 

APPOINTED BY THE BOARD OF HEALTH 

COMMUNITY NURSE 
Cheryl Ciechowski (Resigned) 1976 

Maria Pugatch (Appointed) 1976 

BURIAL AGENT 
George Wells (Deceased) 1976 

Elizabeth J. Snelling (Appointed) 1976 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 
Margaret B. Marsh 1976 



17 



APPOINTED BY THE MODERATOR 



PERSONNEL BOARD 



Virginia Vockel, Chairman 

Kenneth Lawrence 

Ross Whitman (Resigned) 



FINANCE COMMITTEE 



John Ehrenfeld 

William A. Williams, Jr. 

Beth Sutherland 

Arthur L. Coburn, III 

William C. Munroe, Jr., Chairman 



Term ExpirJ 



1977 
1978 
1976 



1977 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1976 



VOCATIONAL REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 



Ruth Wales 



1977 



APPOINTED BY SELECTMEN, 
SCHOOL COMMITTEE AND MODERATOR 



James Duffy 
Guilbert S. Winchell 



TOWN BUILDING COMMITTEE 



SCHOLARSHIP FUND COMMITTEE 



Saville R. Davis, Chairman 
Edith Mar 

Charles W. Calkins, Jr., D. M. D. 
Daniel Cheever, Jr., ex officio 



1977 
1977 



1977 
1978 
1976 



APPOINTED BY PLANNING BOARD 



BICYCLE PATH STUDY COMMITTEE 



Owen Beenhouwer 
Denise Bienfang 
Michael Farny 
John R. Snelling 
Roger Taunton-Rigby 
Laurence Zuelke 
Marjorie Smith, Chairman 



18 



1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 
1976 




George Wells 
Our late, beloved Town Clerk who brightened the 
lives of so many Lincoln residents, old and new 



TOWN CLERK 

George Wells 



The Town Clerk is the official recorder of Town events and 
activities and issues licenses and certificates. His duties include 
recording the proceedings at Town Meetings and Elections and notify- 
ing the Selectmen and other officers concerned of appropriations 
which have been voted. 

The record of registered voters of Lincoln is kept at the 
Town Clerk's office. Persons wishing to become voters in the Town 
should communicate with the Clerk. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
March 29, 1975 

Pursuant to a Warrant duly served, the meeting was called to 
order by the Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, at 9:30 a.m. The 
return of the Warrant was read, and the Moderator called attention 
to Article 1 of the Warrant (Election of Officers), which will be 
acted upon on March 31st. A quorum being present, the following 
business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, 
commissioners, trustees, and other officers required by law to be 
elected by ballot or otherwise. 

VOTED : That Frederick B. Taylor be elected Measurer 
of Wood and Bark for the ensuing year. 



ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers , 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

VOTED : That the reports of the Town Officers, Committees, 
Commissioners and Trustees, as printed in the Town Report, be 
accepted. 



19 



ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the 
several elective officers of the Town and to determine whether any 
Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional 
compensation of such members. 

VOTED : That the salaries of the elected officials of 
the Town for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 1975, and ending 
June 30, 1976, be fixed at the following amounts: 

Selectmen, each $100.00 

Town Clerk 200.00 

Treasurer 8, Collector 700.00 

Assessors, Chairman 200.00 

Assessors, other members, each 175.00 

Water Commissioners, each 75.00 

and that the Board of Assessors is authorized to employ one of its 
members to work on assessment policies at a salary not to exceed 
$2,450.00 for the said fiscal period. 



ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary 
and expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town adopt as separate appropriations 
the listed recommendations in Exhibit 6, attached to the report of 
the Finance Committee, printed on pages 15 through 23, inclusive, 
of the Financial Section and Warrant for the 1975 Town Meeting, 
except that the following numbered accounts will be increased as 
follows : 

Police - Expense - will increase by $2,800 to 
$16,900; 

Elementary Schools - Instruction - will increase 
by $31,360 to $1,255,618; 

Elementary Schools - Operation § Maintenance - 
will increase by $7,200 to $268,000; 

Norton-Militzer Land Bonds - will increase by 
$40,000 to $50,000; 

To be changed from SILC membership to Regional 
Planning - and to increase by $500 to $1,000; 



20 



Item 


101 


Item 


502. 


Item 


504 


Item 


817 


Item 


907 



and that all items be raised by taxation except to the following 
extent : 

Item 13 . Financial Offices - Salaries - $1,575 to be 
taken from Water Department receipts when 
received; 

Item 100 . Police Department - Salaries - $60,000 to be 
taken from Federal Revenue Sharing Funds, and 
$15,800 to be taken from the Agency Account 
established for payments in lieu of taxes; 

Item 502 . Elementary Schools - Instruction - $52,000 to 
be taken from Metco funds; 

Item 504 . Elementary Schools - Operation § Maintenance - 
$7,200 to be taken from the Agency Account es- 
tablished for funds received from rental of 
Center School rooms, $1,263.44 to be taken from 
the Julian DeCordova School Equipment Fund, and 
$65.18 to be taken from the Grammar School Fund; 



Item 


520. 


Item 


521. 


Item 


805. 


Item 


809. 


Item 


815. 



Item 816. 



Item 817. 



Library - Salaries 
Dog Tax Receipts; 



$1,751.07 to be taken from 



Library - Books, etc. - $2,837.63 to be taken 
from State Aid to Libraries; 

School Building Bonds - $120,000 to be taken from 
free cash; 



Land Purchase Bonds 
free cash; 



$32,000 to be taken from 



Swimming Pool Bonds - $10,000 to be taken from 
the Agency Account established for funds to be 
received from the Codman Trustees; 

Interest on Swimming Pool Bonds - $4,600 to be 
taken from the Agency Account established for 
funds to be received from the Codman Trustees; 

Norton-Militzer Land Bonds - $40,000 to be taken 
from receipts received under Section 11 of 
Chapter 132A, G. L. 



21 



The total for General Purposes for the fiscal period from 
July 1, 1975, through June 30, 1976, is shown in Exhibit 6 as 
$3,993,021.41, and with amendments is now $4,074,881.41. After 
application of special funds as listed above, the amount to be 
raised is $3,725,789.09. 

Items 950 to 956, inclusive, totalling $129,145.00, as listed 
on page 23, shall be taken from Water Department receipts. 



ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial 
year beginning July 1, 1975, in accordance with the provisions of 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to issue a note 
or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or 
notes as may be given for a period of less than one year, in accord- 
ance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 

VOTED: That the Town Treasure, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, be and hereby is authorized to borrow money from time to 
time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year beginning 
July 1, 1975, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended , and to issue a note or notes 
therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year, in accordance with 
General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as amended. 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual 
contract with the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the 
elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen 
and the School Committee to continue the Town's annual contract with 
the U. S. Commissioner of Education to operate the elementary school 
at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts. 



ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the 
School Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited number of 
children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes of education 
or take any other action relative thereto. 



22 



VOTED: To pass over the article. (The contents of 
this article were discussed in detail under Article 5 and an implicit 
endorsement of the Metco Program was expressed.) 



ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the 
School Committee to transfer funds within the Elementary Schools 
Budget voted under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1974 Annual Town 
Meeting: namely, transfers from line items TRANSPORTATION, INSTRUC- 
TION and ADMINISTRATION to line items OPERATION § MAINTENANCE, ACQUI- 
SITION OF FIXED ASSETS and PROGRAMS WITH OTHER SYSTEMS; provided, 
however, that the total funds so transferred shall not exceed 
$42,000, and the total expenditures shall not exceed the total Ele- 
mentary Schools Budget so voted under said Article 5, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the School Committee is hereby authorized 
to transfer funds within the Elementary Schools Budget voted under 
Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1974 Annual Town Meeting: namely, 
transfers from line items TRANSPORTATION, INSTRUCTION and ADMINISTRA- 
TION to line items OPERATION § MAINTENANCE, ACQUISITION OF FIXED 
ASSETS and PROGRAMS WITH OTHER SYSTEMS; provided, however, that the 
total funds so transferred shall not exceed $42,000, and the total 
expenditures shall not exceed the total Elementary Schools Budget 
so voted under said Article 5. 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning 
Bylaw of the Town of Lincoln by adding a new paragraph to Section 
XI B of the Bylaw, which section deals with the powers of the Board 
of Appeals, authorizing said Board, upon the request of the Selectmen 
with the approval of the School Committee, to grant special permits 
allowing part or all of any school building owned by the Town and 
not needed for educational purposes to be used for any of the Uses 
Permitted in a B-l Retail Business District, as provided in Section 
V B 1 of the Bylaw, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: Motion defeated. 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to provide kitchen and toilet facilities and 
accessory facilities such as septic systems, in the Codman Barn 
complex on land owned by the Town, acquired from Roger B. Tyler and 
Benjamin T. Fawcett, Trustees under the will of Ogden Codman, pur- 
suant to the vote under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Special Town 

23 



Meeting held on June 16, 1970, and to determine whether such sum 
shall be raised by taxation, by transfer of available funds, by 
borrowing, by gift, or by any combination thereof, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are hereby authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the Town to execute such contracts and other 
documents as they may deem advisable to install kitchen and toilet 
facilities and accessory facilities such as septic systems in the 
Codman barns on land owned by the Town, acquired from Roger B. Tyler 
and Benjamin T. Fawcett, Trustees under the will or Ogden Codman, 
pursuant to the vote under Article 5 of the Warrant for the Special 
Town Meeting held on June 16, 1970, and that the sum of $30,000 is 
raised and appropriated therefor, $5,000 thereof to be taken from 
funds given the Town for that purpose by said Roger B. Tyler and 
said Benjamin T. Fawcett as such Trustees and the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Selectmen, is authorized to borrow $25,000 pur- 
suant to the applicable provisions of the General Laws. 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by striking out Section 5 of Article II 
entitled "Town Meetings" and inserting in place thereof a new Section 
5 substantially as follows: 

" Section 5 . The number of voters necessary to constitute a 
quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 100, provided, however, 
that a number less than a quorum may from time to time adjourn 
the same. This section shall not apply to such parts of meet- 
ings as are devoted to the election of Town Officers." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town amend the General Bylaws of the 
Town of Lincoln by striking out Section 5 of Article II entitled 
"Town Meetings" and inserting in place thereof a new Section 5 as 
follows : 

" Section 5 . The number of voters necessary to constitute a 
quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 100, provided, however, that a 
number less than a quorum may from time to time adjourn the same. 
This section shall not apply to such parts of meetings as are de- 
voted to the election of Town Officers." 

(The first vote lost, 113 no to 77 yes; a vote to reconsider passed, 
150 yes to 2 no; upon reconsideration after action was taken on 
Article 14, the motion passed 146 yes to 38 no.) 



24 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by striking out Section 5 of Article II 
entitled "Town Meetings" and inserting in place thereof a new Section 
5 substantially as follows: 

" Section 5 . The number of voters necessary to constitute 
a quorum at any Town Meeting shall be 100, provided, however, 
that a number less than a quorum may from time to time adjourn 
the same and provided that at the time of voting on any of the 
following questions the number of voters constituting a quorum 
shall be 8% of the number of voters eligible to attend the 
meeting as shown on the List of Registered Voters in use at 
the meeting: 

a. Any motion to amend the Zoning Map of the Town; 

b. Any motion authorizing the acquisition of any property 
by eminent domain without the consent of the owner 
thereof; 

c. Any motion to borrow money authorizing the issue of notes 
or bonds of the Town, other than a motion to borrow money 
in anticipation of the revenue and to issue notes therefor 
pursuant to the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, 
Section 4, as amended; or 

d. Any motion to change this section of the General Bylaws. 

This section shall not apply to such parts of meetings as are 
devoted to the election of Town Officers." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 
VOTED: Motion defeated. 



ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 
Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by adding to Article II entitled "Town 
Meetings" a new Section 13 substantially as follows: 

" Section 13 . Before any Annual Town Meeting the Moderator 
may select from the Warrant those articles which in his judgment 
are likely to be adopted without debate and cause such articles 
and the motions to be made under each one to be published in 
a Consent Calendar, copies of which shall be sent by mail or 
otherwise to each household at least seven days before the 
date of such meeting. At an appropriate time in the meeting, 

25 



the Moderator may announce consideration of the Consent Calendar. 
Notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 6 and 9 of this 
Article II, a motion is then in order to adopt the motions in 
the Consent Calendar as a group without debate. After second- 
ing of the motion the Moderator shall recognize any voter for 
the purpose of holding out any article and shall cause any 
article thus held out to be deleted from the motion to adopt. 
When all requests to hold out articles have been received, he 
shall put the motion as modified to a vote. Adoption of the 
motion by unanimous vote shall constitute adoption of all of 
the motions contained therein. Thereafter all articles held 
out, or if the motion to adopt is not voted unanimously, all 
articles in the Consent Calendar, shall be acted upon in accord- 
ance with the provisions of Sections 6 and 9 of this Article." 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town amend the General Bylaws of the Town 
of Lincoln by adding to Article II entitled "Town Meetings" a new 
section 13 as follows: 

" Section 13 . Before any annual Town Meeting the Moderator 
may select from the Warrant those articles which in his judg- 
ment are likely to be adopted without debate and cause such 
articles and the motions to be made under each one to be pub- 
lished in a Consent Calendar, copies of which shall be sent 
by mail or otherwise to each household at least seven days 
before the date of such meeting. At an appropriate time in 
the meeting, the Moderator may announce consideration of the 
Consent Calendar. Notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 
6 and 9 of this Article II, a motion is then in order to adopt 
the motions in the Consent Calendar as a group without debate. 
After seconding of the Motion the Moderator shall recognize 
any voter for the purpose of holding out any article and shall 
cause any article thus held out to be deleted from the motion 
to adopt. When all requests to hold out articles have been 
received, he shall put the motion as modified to a vote. 
Adoption of the motion by unanimous vote shall constitute 
adoption of all of the motions contained therein. Thereafter 
all articles held out, or if the motion to adopt is not voted 
unanimously, all articles in the Consent Calendar, shall be 
acted upon in accordance with the provisions of Sections 6 
and 9 of this Article." 



26 



ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to submit an application to the Massachusetts Historical 
Commission for the inclusion of the Codman Barns complex on the Na- 
tional Register of Historic Places, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to submit an application to the Massachusetts Historical Commission 
for the inclusion of the Codman Barns on the National Register of 
Historic Places. 



ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the construction of a shelter near the 
Public Works building to be used to store salt and sand used in con- 
nection with the control of ice and snow conditions, or take any other 
action relatiye thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$11,000 for the construction of a shelter near the Public Works 
building to be used to store salt and sand used in connection with 
the control of snow and ice conditions. 



ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money not to exceed $200,000 by borrowing under the 
provision of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 8 (5), as amended, to 
be used by the Water Department for any one or more of the following 

a. Lining water mains in any one or more of Lincoln Road, 
Tower Road, Pierce Hill Road and the lane into the 
Pressure Reservoir from Bedford Road; 

b. Construction of an 8" or a 10" main in any one or more 
of Baker Bridge Road, Concord Road, Old Concord Road and 
Weston Road; and 

c. Connecting the existing main on Elementary School property 
to the main in Sandy Pond Road. 

or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Water Commissioners are hereby authoriz 
to install ten inch water mains in Baker Bridge Road, Concord Road ai 
Old Concord Road and an eight inch water main in Weston Road togethe 
with appropriate hydrants and fittings, such water mains to replace 



27 



i 



i 



existing obsolete and inadequate six inch mains and that the sum of 
$200,000 is hereby appropriated therefor and to meet such appropria- 
tion the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is hereby 
authorized to borrow the sum of $200,000 under the provisions of 
General Laws Chapter 44, Section 8(5) and to issue bonds or notes of 
the Town therefor payable in accordance with said Chapter 44 so that 
the whole loan shall be paid in not more than fifteen years from the 
date of issue of the first bond or note and that the appropriate 
officers of the Town are hereby authorized to apply for any available 
state and federal aid for this project and that any such aid received 
shall be applied and is hereby appropriated towards the expenses of 
the project. 



After a motion to adjourn the meeting until Tuesday, April 1, 
1975 at 7:30 p.m. was unanimously voted, the meeting was adjourned 
at 6 p.m. 



ADJOURNED TOWN MEETING 
April 1, 1975 



On Tuesday, April 1, 1975, the adjourned session of the March 29, 
1975, Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:35 p.m. by the 
Moderator, Mr. Kenneth W. Bergen, and a quorum being present, the 
following business was transacted: 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to petition the 
Massachusetts General Court to enact legislation relative to the 
granting of licenses by the Town for the sale therein of wine and 
malt beverages not to be consumed on the premises by causing to be 
placed on the official Town Ballot to be used for the election of 
officers at the next Annual Town Meeting the following question: 

"Shall licenses be granted in the Town of Lincoln for the 
sale therein of wine and malt beverages not to be consumed 
on the premises?" 

VOTED: Motion defeated. 



28 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the use of 
the Public Works Department, or take any other action relative there- 
to. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,600 for the purchase of equipment for the use of the Public Works 
Department . 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to equip the Bean pumper, the purchase of which 
was authorized under Article 10 of the Warrant for the 1974 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$10,000 to equip the Bean pumper, the purchase of which was authorize: 
under Article 10 of the Warrant for the 1974 Annual Town Meeting. 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the replacement of the present boiler at 
the Fire § Police Station, or take any other action relative thereto 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,800 for the replacement of the present boiler at the Fire § Polic 
Station. 



ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money for the replacement of the present emergency 
generator at the Fire § Police Station, including the construction 
of a generator shed, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$15,000 for the replacement of the present emergency generator at 
the Fire $ Police Station, including the construction of a generatoi 
shed. 



ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a publ 
way the private road known as Page Farm Road, as shown on a plan 
entitled "Plan Showing Lot Layout for Page Farm", owned by Paul 0. 
Roberts, Jr., dated November 1, 1970, said plan being approved by thf 
Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln December 16, 1970, and recorded 
in the Middlesex South District Registry of Deeds as Plan 85A of 19* 



29 



and for this purpose will authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire 
by eminent domain, purchase or otherwise, the land contained therein, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town accept as a public way the private 
road known as Page Farm Road, as shown on a plan entitled "Plan Show- 
ing Lot Layout for Page Farm", Paul 0. Roberts, Engineer, dated 
November 1, 1970, said plan being approved by the Planning Board of 
the Town of Lincoln on December 16, 1970, and recorded in the Middle- 
sex South District Registry of Deeds as Plan 85A of 1971, and that 
the Town for this purpose authorizes the Board of Selectmen to ac- 
quire by eminent domain the land therein contained and to accept a 
confirmatory deed thereto. 



ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate, or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to be 
placed in a separate account in the town treasury, all as authorized 
by Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971, to be expended for the celebra- 
tion in the year nineteen hundred and seventy-five or nineteen hun- 
dred and seventy-six of the two hundredth anniversary of the American 
Revolution, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Town vote to raise and appropriate the 
sum of $3,500 to be placed in a separate account in the Town Treasury 
to be expended for the celebration in the year 1975 or 1976 of the 
200th anniversary of the American Revolution, all as authorized by 
Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971. 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will adopt the following 
resolution to amplify and implement the resolution adopted under 
Article 21 of the Annual Town Meeting held March 27, 1971: 

"RESOLVED: The Lincoln Affirmative Action Committee (formerly 
the Lincoln Equal Employment Opportunity Committee) shall have 
the responsibility to promote, directly or indirectly, by 
affirmative action, equal opportunity without discrimination 
on account of race, color, religious creed, national origin, 
sex, age or ancestry in all areas where the legitimate interests 
of the Town of Lincoln may be affected, such as Town employment 
practices, Town contractual arrangements, local housing avail- 
ability, Town education policies and other activities impacting 
on Town services" 

or take any other action relative thereto. 



30 



VOTED: That the Town adopt the following resolution to 
amplify and implement the resolution adopted under Article 21 of 
the Annual Town Meeting held March 27, 1971: 

"RESOLVED: The Lincoln Affirmative Action Committee (formerly 
the Lincoln Equal Employment Opportunity Committee) shall have 
the responsibility to promote, directly or indirectly, by 
affirmative action, equal opportunity without discrimination 
on account of race, color, religious creed, national origin, 
sex, age, or ancestry in all areas where the legitimate inter- 
ests of the Town of Lincoln may be affected, such as Town em- 
ployment practices, Town contractual arrangements, local housing 
availability, Town education policies and other activities 
impacting on Town services." 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to convey all its 
right, title and interest in and to Nelson Road, which in the opinion 
of the Selectmen is no longer required for public purposes, to the 
United States of America or the appropriate department thereof for 
the use of the Minute Man National Historical Park for the sum of 
$1.00 and other valuable consideration, and to authorize the Select- 
men to execute, acknowledge and deliver, in the name and on behalf 
of the Town, such deeds and other documents as they may deem neces- 
sary or desirable to carry out the provisions of this vote, or to 
take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are hereby authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the Town to convey for the sum of $1.00 all 
the Town's right, title and interest in and to Nelson Road which, in 
the opinion of the Selectmen, is no longer required for public pur- 
poses to the United States of America or the appropriate department 
thereof for the use of the Minute Man National Historical Park. In 
order to carry out the provisions of this vote, the Selectmen are 
hereby authorized to execute, acknowledge and deliver in the name and 
on behalf of the Town such deeds and other documents as they may 
deem necessary or desirable. 



ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or transfer from available funds in the Treasury the sum of 
$28,154, or any other sum, for the construction and/or improvements 
of town roads as requested by the Board of Selectmen, to be reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth under Chapter 765, Section 4, Acts of 
1972, or take any other action relative thereto. 



31 



VOTED : That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$28,154 for the construction and/or improvement of town roads, as 
requested by the Board of Selectmen, said sum to be taken from free 
cash and returned thereto when reimbursement is received from the 
Commonwealth under Chapter 765, Section 4, Acts of 1972. 



ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate or transfer from available funds in the Treasury the sum of 
$24,000, or any other sum, for the construction and/or improvements 
of town roads as requested by the Board of Selectmen, to be reim- 
bursed by the Commonwealth under Chapter 725, Section 4, Acts of 
1974, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$24,000, for the construction and/or improvements of town roads as 
requested by the Board of Selectmen, said sum to be taken from free 
cash and returned thereto when reimbursement is received from the 
Commonwealth under Chapter 825, Section 4, Acts of 1974. 



ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appro- 
priate a sum of money to be added to the funds appropriated under 
Article 13 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting for the construction of a 
bicycle path on Codman and South Great Roads, and to transfer to the 
account established for such funds the unexpended balance of the 
funds voted to be appropriated for the Trapelo Road bicycle path 
under Article 1 of the Special Town Meeting held on May 15, 1972, 
and under Article 11 of the 1973 Annual Town Meeting, or take any 
other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : (as adopted after amendment) That the Town vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $4,250 to be added to funds 
appropriated under Article 13 of the 1974 Annual Town Meeting for the 
construction of a bicycle path on Codman and South Great Roads, from 
the intersection of said Codman Road with Lincoln Road, along Codman 
Road to South Great Road, and thence along South Great Road, said 
$4,250 to be raised by taxation. 



ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to continue the arrangements with the Lincoln Foundation, Inc., first 
authorized under Article 16 of the Warrant for the 1970 Annual Town 
Meeting to lease the former Lunt and Campobasso houses on Tower Road 
now owned by the Town to moderate income tenants, or take any other 



32 



action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Selectmen are hereby authorized in the 
name and on behalf of the Town to lease the Campobasso and Lunt 
houses on Tower Road, which houses belong to the Town, to the Lincoln 
Foundation, Inc., for such sums and upon such terms and conditions as i 
the Selectmen shall determine, including, without limiting the gener- 
ality of the foregoing, granting to the Lincoln Foundation, Inc., 
the right to sub-lease said houses to moderate income tenants. 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen 
to enter into a contract with the Town of Concord to permit town 
residents to use the Concord sanitary land fill, and to appropriate 
a sum of money therefor, or take any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : To pass over the article. 



ARTICLE 32 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts 
of money and income received from use of conservation properties for 
the maintenance and improvement of conservation properties, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

VOTED : That the Conservation Commission be and hereby 
is authorized for the fiscal year 1975-76 to expend sums received 
from the use of conservation properties for the maintenance and 
improvement of such conservation properties. 



At 10:15 p.m., there being no further business to be trans- 
acted, it was voted to adjourn the Annual Town Meeting. 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



33 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
March 31, 1975 



In accordance with Article 1 of the Warrant for the Annual Town 
Meeting, the Polls were declared open at 7:30 a.m. by Mr. Robert M. 
Gargill, who with Mr. John B. Garrison, Mr. George Wells, Mrs. 
William Elliott, Mr. William G. Langton and Mr. Howard Snelling act- 
ing as assistant Registrar, acted as Warden throughout the day. 
The following ballot clerks were sworn: Eleanor Wilfert, Ethel 
Mackenzie, Jacqueline Snelling, Phyllis Nelms, Hazel Maclnnis, 
Natalie Faddoul, Judith Emmons, Isabel Farley, Barbara Garrison, 
Jan Mead, Barbara Warner and Isabel Pierce. The polls were declared 
closed at 8 p.m. by Mr. Garrison. There was a total vote of 1249, 
with the following results: 



Moderator (for three years) 



Kenneth W. Bergen 

Scattering 

Blanks 



1063 

3 

183 



Town Clerk (for one year) George Wells 

Blanks 



1140 
109 



Selectman (for three years) Harold A. Levey, Jr. 

Peter B. Adams 
Scattering 
Blanks 



789 

411 

2 

49 



Town Treasurer (for one year) Richard Wengren 

Blanks 



1026 
223 



Assessor (for three years) Douglas M. Burckett 

Blanks 



1038 
211 



Collector of Taxes (for two 

years - to fill vacancy) Richard Wengren 

Blanks 



1020 
229 



School Committee (2 members) 
(for three years) 



Lynn B. Donaldson 
Priscilla A. Damon 
Nancy J. Coons 
Blanks 



803 
681 
377 
637 



34 



Water Commissioner (for 
three years) 



Board of Health (for three 
years) 



Cemetery Commissioner (for 
three years) 



Planning Board (for five 
years) 



Commissioner of Trust Funds 
(for three years) 



Trustee of Bemis Fund 
(for three years) 



Trustee of Lincoln Library 
(for two years - to fill 
vacancy) 

Director of DeCordova § Dana 
Museum (for four years) 



Recreation Committee (for 
three years) 



Tree Warden (for one year) 



Stuart B. Avery, Jr. 
Blanks 


1029 
220 


Joan M. Comstock 
Blanks 


1045 
204 


Vincent N. Merrill 
Blanks 


1007 
242 


Owen Beenhouwer 
Ann P. Brown 
Blanks 


403 
693 
153 


William B. Russell 
Blanks 


1005 
244 


Thomas B. Adams 
Blanks 


1011 
238 


Katherine S. Bolt 
Blanks 


1045 
204 


Gregory S. Kolligian 

Scattering 

Blanks 


978 

1 

270 


Leo J. Algeo 
Blanks 


1090 
159 


Russell L. Barnes 
Blanks 


1007 

242 



35 



Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
School District School 
Committee (two members) 
(for three years) 



Susan L. Berry 


730 


Cameron H. Eiseman 


383 


David M. Ford 


411 


Reginald L. Maynard 


686 


Scattering 


16 


Blanks 


272 



QUESTION: "Shall licenses be granted in this 
Town for the operation, holding or 
conducting a game commonly called 
BEANO?" 



Yes 295 

No 840 

Blanks 114 



George Wells, Town Clerk 



36 



FINANCE 

FINANCIAL SERVICES OFFICE 

J. Timothy Grobleski, Financial Manager 



The Town bid farewell to a very loyal and loved Treasurer and 
Collector, Frederick B. Taylor. Although ever present for counsel, 
the Town realized its loss at a memorable reception for Fred at the 
Pierce House. The Town also lost two devoted employees: Lois 
McClure Light retired as Town Accountant, and Ann E. Paddock retired 
as Assistant Treasurer and Collector. 

Following a year marked by change, the Financial Offices began 
to carry out the original outlines of the study by the Arthur Young 
Company. The efforts contributed by both the school and the Town 
in streamlining its financial operations are being carried forward. 
A decision was made to contract the accounting functions of the town 
with the Harvard Trust Company. Early next year the Selectmen and 
the School Committee will see detailed reports of spending compiled 
by this data processing service. The service will aid the budgeting 
process in many respects. Reporting will be more detailed and com- 
piled with greater speed, allowing the departments and committee mem- 
bers to see precise spending reports. 

Budgeting and spending in the extreme inflationary period called 
for close scrutiny. Returned to free cash from the reserve fund 
at the close of the fiscal period was $8.83. However the return 
to free cash from the appropriations was $92,564.72. 

Nineteen seventy five was a year when everyone became concerned 
about the relationship between spending and the level of service. 
How can the level of service offered to the citizens be maintained 
without substantially increasing costs? This question was the fore- 
thought in everyone's mind while putting together the budget. Apart 
from forces outside the town which relate to the state and federal 
government, Lincoln has put forth a remarkable effort in answering 
this question. Once again the interest and participation of the 
residents has helped the Town overcome a particularly pressing time. 



37 



to 


o 


to 


r^ 


00 


CN 


n- 


o 


■^r 


vO 


00 


CN 














vO 


o 


SO 


to 


en 


o 


to 


o 


to 


to 


to 


to 


\0 


o 


vO 


* 


vO 


■** 














en 


o 


en 


00 


^ 


to 


t-- 


o 


t^- 


en 


00 


en 


CN 


r-. 


cn 


*■ 


to 


to 



o 


o o o 


o 


o o o 






o 


o o o 


O 


o o o 


o 


o o o 






O 


o o o 


o 


o o o 


(N 


HNN 



,_| 


vO 


,_| 


vO 


"3- 


o 


en 


lo 










** 


o 


to 


o 


LO 


00 


LO 


00 


o 


vO 


to 


to 










vO 


00 


to 


1— 1 


f—{ 


CN 


to 


l-l 





-o 




co 




fH 




•H 


vO 


3 


LO 


cr 


• 


o 


o 


rt 


00 




to 


to 



or 






<c 






UJ 






>- 






UJ 


bo 




:c 


C 




t- 


•H 


1— 1 




f-4 


** 


cd 


rt 




o 


X 


f-l 


Ll_ 


to 


LO 

00 


1— 


<u 


•> 


ac 


3 


in 


o 


c 


CN 


Q_ 


o 




UJ 


> 


■** 


Od 


0) 

OS 




to 






QT 






Ul 






Od 






Z3 






en 






<£ 






Ul 






q; 






1— 


L0 


pH 




T3 


vO 




c 


• 




3 


o 























fn 






















09 













































tw 






















o 






















4-> 






















(fl 






















O 






















u 




!—i 


t— < 


CN 


o 








o 








*t 


i— i 


a> 


vO 








vO 




■o 






















c 




>— i 


LO 


vO 


en 








en 




a 




LO 


o 


\o 


00 








00 








00 


to 


00 


CN 








CN 




♦j 






















•H 




LO 


to 


•— i 


h-. 








t^- 




tfi 




CN 


LO 

* 

* 


LO 


CN 








CN 
•69- 


•p 


O 

o 
o 

CO 

o 
+-> 
ri 
u 

•H 


o 


r-l 


o 


LO 


vO 




o o o 


o 


vO 


U 


•H 


o 


VO 


LO 


o 


O 




o o o 


o 


o 


o 


«J 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




• • • 


• 


• 


(X u 


o 


o 


00 


cn 


o 




o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to 


"3- 


i— i 


vO 




o o o 


o 


vO 


06 


o 


o 


r- 


^ 


t 


r^ 




o o o 


o 


r-. 
























n 


M 


o 


t~^ 


vD 


a> 


i* 




o o o 


o 


■^r 


m 


C 


o 


to 


i— 1 


en 


LO 




o o o 


o 


LO 


•M 


•H 


r- 


en 


to 

i-( 
i—( 


i-4 

i— i 


to 


•M 


CN i-( CN 


rj 


o 

>-i 
■cy3- 


§ 

4-> 

c 









LO 






•H 








O «4-| 






r^ 


LO 




'x 








o 


c 



Lj-I CO 

O T3 

C 

to 3 

CD PL, 
4-> 4-> 

•H B) 4J H 

tO O -H 0} 

O *H L0 f-l 

P,Lh o <u 

T3 4-> CD CD 

f-i T3 U 
C <1> 
O U 



L0 

to +-> 

+-> a, 

CL.-H 
•H <D 
CO O 
O CD 
CD 0£ 



\o 
I 

\ ctl 

-i Pu, 

r-» en 

4-> 

to C 

C f-« 

rt ^ 

U cd 



O 
fX 

o 

Q 

LW (0 
O T3 

C LO LO 

to 3 r-- r-- 



vO to o 

O -H 
to £L,Lw 

O T3 +-> 

C ^1 

CS C 0) 

-H O U 



CD 

C <U 1) 

<D 3 3 

CJ5 Q Q 



CD CD 



CO 

* o 

to CD 
^H f-l 

•H 

rt to 

+-> CD 
CD T3 

i— i 
f-l o 
O X 

U, UJ 



38 



Oi 


o 


v£> 


© 


r- 


CI 


o 


tO 


o 


00 












r- 


^3- 


ct> 


o 


00 


m 


ct> 


\0 


vO 


■<* 


o 


•*t 


00 


r— 1 


00 












h* 


00 


,— I 


CTi 


v£> 


N 


.— i 


ct> 


CN 


r-- 





c 









P. 




bo 




c 







\o 


S 


LO 






TD 


o 


P. 


00 


03 


to 


X. 



r^- ^t CTi 

r^ ct> vo 

v£> rf oo 

LO 00 i-H 



r-- 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


v0 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o^" 


■^r 


o 


o 


o 


o 


oo 


00 


o 


o 


o 


o 


00 














vO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


cm 


r^ 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 




CM 


I— 1 


CM 


CM 


o 











c 








•H 




•H 




•H 




w 










o 








(/3 




I/) 




I/) 




o 


• • 




^ 




•H 








o 




o 




O 




a, 


LO 




C 




P 








Ph 




a. 




Dh 







r-- 


• 


ri 




3 








CD 














Q 


\ 


o 


0Q 




P 








— 




a 




a 






o 


u 




(/) 


• H 




















<P 


to 




X 


p 


P 




E 




4-1 




tP 




ip 




o 


»v 


p 


P 


c 


V) 


CO 


rt 


4-> 


O 


LO 


O 


LO 


o 


LO 


LO 


\D 


l/l 


c 


0J 


c 


W5 


x 


c 




r^ 




r** 




r^ 


r-- 




g 


3 


X. 


1 — 1 


C 


p 


3 


0) 


\ 





*v 





*»•«. 


^ 





O 


o 






iH 


o 


P 


*t 


P 




■M 


oo 


P .-1 


o 


H 


u 


u 


X 


> 


ed 


u 


(4 




03 


CM 


a 


CM 


rt -i 


c 












aJ 


s 


o 


O 


**. 


u 


\ 


o 


"V. 


O ^ 


oj 


T3 


p 


2 


m 


CO 


1 


a3 


•H 


to- 


•H 


h* 


•H 


t"» 


•H 00 


1— I 


P. 


3 




o 




c 




<P 




<P 




<4H 




<P 


a 


rt 




• 


1— 1 


fc 


o s 


•H 


Ot 


•H 


a> 


• H 





•H 


X> 


> 


5 


w 


T3 


o 


4-> 


O 


P 


3 


P 


3 


+-> 


3 


P 3 




P 


rt 




-a 


<4^ 


•£ 


2 


P 


-d 


U 


-a 


P 


•3 


p T3 


X 


rt 


X 




•H 



















0) 







c/> 


I 


CO 


2 


s 




2 




u 




u 




u 




CJ 



39 



CEMETERY PERPETUAL CARE FUNDS 

Julia A. Bemis $ 300.00 

William H. Benjamin 500.00 

Marie H. Bisbee 200.00 

Mildred E. Bowles 200.00 

Agnes L. Brown 300.00 

George Browning 200.00 

Sarah J. Browning 200.00 

Elizabeth G. Chapin 300.00 

Robert B. Chapin 300.00 

William H. Costello 100.00 

Mary H. Cushing 100.00 

Anthony J. Doherty 500.00 

Paul Dorian 150.00 

Charles P. Farnsworth 350.00 

Edward R. Farrar 300.00 

Francis Flint 250.00 

Orila J. Flint 300.00 

Donald Gordon 300.00 

Raymond E. Hagerty 150.00 

George Harrington 100.00 

Samuel Hartwell 300.00 

Thomas Huddleston 200.00 

Abijah G. Jones 300.00 

M. Gertrude Kelley 300.00 

John J. Kelliher 200.00 

Byron Lunt 300.00 

Gardner Moore 300.00 

Lena M. Newell 325.00 

Joa Pacewicz 400.00 

John H. Pierce 500.00 

Anne D. Pollard 300.00 

Charles 0. Preble 100.00 

Annie A. Ray 300.00 

Mary Susan Rice 87.27 

E. H. Rogers 250.00 

Mary James Scripture 500.00 

Eugene Sherman 200.00 

Charles S. Smith 300.00 

J. Waldo Smith 300.00 

Webster Smith 300.00 

Helen 0. Storrow 2,000.00 

George G. Tarbell 400.00 

Laura B. $ Arthur E. Thiessen 500.00 

Maria L. Thompson 500.00 

Mabel H. Todd 200.00 

Ellen T. Trask 200.00 

Albert Washburn 500.00 

Elizabeth S. Wheeler 200.00 

Ellen F. Whitney 100.00 

Lewis W. Woodworth 150.00 

$15,612.27 



40 



Perpetual Care Fund income accumulated at 1/1/75 $ 9,936.00 

Income received in 1975 • 1,352.42 

$10,748.42 

Paid for Cemetery maintenance, per Commissioners: 

Planting 183.00 

Grounds maintenance 1,200.00 

1,383.00 

Accumulated income at December 31, 1975 $ 9,365.42 



LINCOLN CONSERVATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1975 $ 5.55 

Interest income in 1975 18.60 

24.15 
Less bank interest allowed to accumulate 18.60 

Cash balance at December 31, 1975 $ 5.55 

Bank Deposits at December 31, 1975 

First National Bank of Boston $ 5.55 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 359.56 

$ 365.11 



LINCOLN STABILIZATION FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1975 $ 32.71 

Interest income in 1975 14.48 

477T9 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 14.48 

Cash balance at December 31, 1975 $ 32.71 

Bank Balances at December 31, 1975 

First National Bank of Boston $ 32.71 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 279.87 

$ 312.58 
41 



OUTSTANDING DEBT AT JUNE 30, 1975 



60,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.60%, due $20,000. each October 1, 
1975-1977, issued under the Acts of 1948 

50,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.70%, due $10,000. each November 1, 
1975-1979, issued under the Acts of 1948 

280,000.00 School Project Loan, 2.90%, due $35,000. each November 15, 
1975-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

40,000.00 School Project Loan, 3.10%, due $5,000. each November 15, 
1975-1982, issued under the Acts of 1948 

475,000.00 School Project Loan, 4.00%, due $50,000. each April 1, 
1976-1980, and $45,000. each April 1, 1981-1985, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws 



905,000.00 Total School Loans 

15,000.00 Fire and Police Station Loan, 3.60%, due $5,000. each 

October 1, 1975-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

70,000.00 Municipal Purposes Loan, 4.00%, due $20,000. on April 1, 
1976, and $10,000. each April 1, 1977-1981, issued under 
Chapter 44, General Laws 

35,000.00 Conservation Loan, 3.5%, due $5,000 each March 1, 1976-1982, 
issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

30,000.00 Conservation Loan, 4.10%, due $10,000. each November 1, 
1975-1977, issued under Chapter 44, General Laws 

250,000.00 Conservation Land Loan, 4.50%, due $45,000. each June 15, 
1976-1977, and $40,000. each June 15, 1978-1981, issued 
under Chapter 44, General Laws 

49,220.00 Conservation Land Loan, 4.60%, due $10,000. each April 1, 
1976-1979, and $9,220 due April 1, 1980 

100,000.00 Swimming Pool Loan, 4.60%, due $10,000. each April 1, 
1976-1985 



$ 1,454,220.00 NET DEBT 

20,000.00 Water Loan, 3.00%, due $5,000. each August 15, 1975-1978 

5,000.00 Water Loan, 3.50%, due $5,000. May 1, 1976 

45,000.00 Water Loan, 5.50%, due $5,000. each June 15, 1976-1984 

10,000.00 Water Loan, 4.40%, due $5,000. each August 1, 1975-1976 

20,000.00 Water Loan, 5.60%, due $5,000. each August 15, 1975-1978 



$ 1,554,220.00 TOTAL DEBT 

42 



TOWN ACCOUNTANT 
Betty L. Lang 



Current Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



Prior Years' Taxes 
Personal 
Real Estate 



From State Local Aid Fund 
School Aid, Chapter 70 
Local Aid - Lottery 
Special Education, Ch. 766 
Aid to Regional School 

District 
Special Gas Tax 
Reimbursement, Publicly 

Owned Land 



In lieu of taxes 
Farrington Memorial 
Massachusetts Port Authority 



REVENUE 
July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 

$ 254,654.71 



26.48 
42,769.77 



172,145.72 

21,694.53 

126,725.00 

19,461.20 
31,083.62 

89,913.77 



1,700.00 
15,800.00 



$ 2,992,271.84 



42,796.25 



461,023.84 



17,500.00 



Fines 

District Court 

Licenses and Permits 
Licenses 
Permits 



Grants and Gifts - Federal 
Air Force School 
Revenue Sharing, P.L. 
52-512 



108.00 
9,746.10 



1,526,941.40 
51,243.00 



2,329.00 



9,854.10 



1,578,184.40 



43 



Grants from State 
School 

Transportation $ 96,836.88 

Food service 8,006.74 

Building assistance 66,278.36 

Metco-Chapter 506 211,900.00 
Adult Civic Education, 

Title III 10,000.00 

Title VI 10,200.00 



Other Purposes 

Governor's Safety Program 995.00 

Library Aid 2,837.63 

Conservation 69,750.00 

Bicentennial 3 , 604 . 00 

Highways 38,766.09 



1975 79,736.24 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 


581.31 


Treasurer 6, Collector 


1,486.00 


Assessors 


271.55 


Town Clerk 


1,065.12 


Planning Board 


200.00 


Board of Appeals 


100.00 


Conservation Commission 


5,308.43 


Bicentennial Commission 


1,241.75 


Historical Commission 


132.00 



$ 403,221.98 



115,952.72 



Grants from County 

Dog Fund 1,751.07 

Gifts from Individuals 4,030.00 

Farm Animal Excise 40.23 

Tax Title Redemptions 6,045.44 

Privileges 

Motor Vehicle Tax 

1972 199.62 

1973 11,456.92 

1974 195,452.76 



286,845.54 



10,386.16 



44 





PUBLIC SAFETY 


lice Department 
Accident reports 
Fire Arms ID 
Attendance Officer 
Restitution 


$ 451.00 

700.00 

65.28 

10.00 



HEALTH AND SANITATION 



Dog inoculations 


368.00 


Garbage collection 


9,046.20 


Dog Officer 




71.00 
HIGHWAYS 


Chapter 90 






State 




12,250.83 


County 




5,102.98 


Reimbursements 


for damages 


1,843.17 


Sale of truck 




500.00 


Sale of scrap 


metal 


1,012.50 


Cutting trees 




25.00 
VETERANS 



20,734.48 



Reimbursement for relief 



SCHOOLS 



Rental of facilities 4,665.00 

School lunch program 7,129.25 

Air Force School Cafeteria 35,630.77 

Tuitions 13,099.26 

Interdistrict Transfer Program 32,548.68 



LIBRARY 



92,872, 



Lost books 
Fines 



122.86 
2,286.82 



2,409.6* 



RECREATION 



Square dances 
Day camp 



350.49 
10,127.20 



10,477.61 



45 



CEMETERIES 



Sale of lots 

Interments 

Miscellaneous 



8,989.00 

1,320.00 

90.00 





UNCLASSIFIED 


Air Force School reim- 




bursement 


64,682.36 


IDT reimbursement 


3,725.82 


Rental of municipal 




property 


1,760.00 




INTEREST 


Interest on taxes 


4,842.90 


Interest on deposits 


6,228.62 


Interest on investments 


57,666.37 


Interest on Federal Revenue 




Sharing 


2,062.11 



$ 10,399.00 



70,168.18 



70,800.00 



AGENCY, TRUST § INVESTMENT 



Dog licenses 
Sale of dogs 
Fish d, Game licenses 
Deputy Collector 
Grammar School Fund 
DeCordova School Eqpt. 
Agency Account, Police 
Agency Account, 
Agency Account, 
Agency Account, 
Agency Account, 

Swimming Pool 
Agency Account, Codman Com 

munity Farms 
Employee deductions 
Surplus cash investment 



Fund 
Detail 
Pierce House 
Garland Cabin 
Swimming Pool 
Codman Trustees 



3,017.20 

9.00 

1,606.50 

1,241.33 

65.18 

1,268.69 

6,310.13 

3,055.00 

1,321.55 

18,972.70 

15,060.00 

201.90 

365,962.57 

,600,000.00 



5,018,091.75 



REFUNDS 



Refunds $ reimbursements 



5,097.51 



46 



MUNICIPAL INDEBTEDNESS 



Serial loan, Norton- 

Militzer land 
Temporary loans 



49,220.00 
69,750.00 



$ 118,970.00 



Total, General Receipts 

Cash Balance, July 1, 1974 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



237,730.61 
25,851.41 



11,369,744.25 



263,582.02 



WATER RECEIPTS 



$11,633,326.27 



Water rates 
Hydrant service 
Connections 
Shut -off s 
Refunds 



Cash Balance, July 1, 1974 



Grand Total, Current Revenue 



85,078.26 

24,675.00 

18,880.00 

20.00 

36.16 



128,689.42 

16,054.41 

144,743.83 

$11,778,070.10 



47 



EXPENDITURES 
July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 

GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



Selectmen 

Executive Secretary- 
Finance Committee 
Financial Administration 
Town Offices 
Town Accountant 
Treasurer § Collector 
Assessors 
Legal 

Town Clerk 

Election § Registration 
Planning Board 
Board of Appeals 
Conservation Commission 
Consulting § Engineering 
Town Hall 



1,626.68 

19,756.64 

45.00 

18,426.42 

35,118.02 

11,275.12 

29,096.62 

4,774.45 

9,447.44 

337.91 

3,310.29 

5,249.62 

209.66 

19,021.70 

13,761.13 

14,514.02 



$ 185,970.72 



PROTECTION OF PERSONS $ PROPERTY 



Police 

Fire 

Communications 

Civil Defense 

Fire § Police Building 

Inspectors of Buildings 



171,403.76 

163,478.81 

42,026.35 

1,662.15 

7,998.67 

18,236.76 



404,806.50 



BOARD OF HEALTH 



Salaries 
Expense 

Inspection service 
Garbage collection 
Dog Officer $ expense 



11,204.40 
8,204.53 
3,341.11 

10,253.00 
1,296.50 



34,299.54 



PUBLIC WORKS 



Public Works - General 
Public Works building 
Codman Rd. Bicycle Path - 

Article 13 - 1974 
Lincoln Rd. Bicycle Path 

Article 12 - 1974 
Trapelo Rd. Bicycle Path 

Article 11 - 1973 



245,505.94 
9,808.41 

23,998.07 

454.50 

627.58 



48 



New equipment - Article 11-1974 $ 3,329.80 
Chapter 90 construction 35,609.49 

Chapter 90 maintenance 8,995.52 



$ 328,329.31 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



Benefits 



6,429.82 



Elementary Schools 
Regional High School 
Vo-Tech High School 
Metco-Chapter 506 
Air Force School 
Interdistrict Transfer 

Program 
Title III 

Title VI, 74-157-101 
Title VI, 74-157-013 
Title VI, 75-157-018 
Library - Title II - ESEA 



EDUCATION 

1,503,336.79 

719,253.63 

49,107.00 

152,660.64 

1,547,035.39 

153,477.37 

15,298.09 

2,625.00 

433.96 

8,977.44 

711.79 



LIBRARY 



4,152,917.10 



Library 

Library building 
Repairs to Library 
Article 27 



84,433.95 
14,801.91 

1,339.40 



100,575.26 



RECREATION 



Salaries 
Expense 



16,421.83 
7,058.45 



23,480.28 



CEMETERIES 



Interments 
Maintenance § expense 



755.64 
5,993.40 



6,749.04 



TOWN DEBT SERVICE 



Temporary loan 
Serial bonds 
Interest on bonds 



170,000.00 

225,000.00 

71,104.38 



466,104.38 



49 





REFUNDS 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


$ 6,917.07 


Real Estate Tax 


14,860.78 


General 


70.00 




UNCLASSIFIED 


Middlesex County Pension Fund 


58,500.00 


Employee Hospital § Insurance 




Fund 


59,737.03 


Property § Indemnity Insurance 


36,144.44 


Town Reports 


3,186.86 


Celebration Committee 


2,923.09 


SILC membership 


18.14 


EEO Committee 


200.00 


Bicentennial - Article 24 


893.33 


Bicentennial - Article 18 


3,781.06 


Regional Refuse Disposal Plan- 




ning Committee - Article 28 


531.00 


Regional Refuse Disposal Plan- 




ning Board - Article 21 


500.00 


Assessors Maps - Article 25 


996.12 


Town Hall heat § smoke sensors 


- 


Article 17 


2,645.53 


Purchase of Militzer land - 




Article 10 


80,000.00 



$ 21,847.85 



250,056.60 



AGENCY, TRUST & INVESTMENTS 



Dog licenses, due County 

Fish § Game licenses 

Care § custody of dogs 

Bicentennial Grant - Library 
Storage Vault 

Agency Account, 

Agency Account, 

Agency Account, 

Agency Account, Garland Cabin 

Agency Account, Codman Barn 

Agency Account, Codman Com- 
munity Farms 

Agency Account 

Agency Account 

Agency Account 

Trustees, Swimming Pool 

Agency Account, Insurance 
Settlements 

Surplus cash investment 



Police Detail 
Deputy Collector 
Pierce House 



Conservation 
Swimming Pool 
Codman 



2,471.10 

1,493.25 

48.00 

3,053.00 
6,083.88 
1,254.63 
3,302.00 
1,150.00 
4,002.55 

266.83 

681.00 

14,640.91 

17,904.29 

1,137.50 
4,600,000.00 



4,657,488.94 



50 



STATE d, COUNTY ASSESSMENTS 



State Parks 

MBTA 

Metropolitan Air Pollution 

Control 
Metropolitan Area Planning 

Council 
Motor Vehicle excise bills 
County tax 
County Hospital 



Employee deductions 



28,512.41 
59,795.01 

350.20 

816.48 

773.40 

155,640.92 

3,206.38 



EMPLOYEE DEDUCTIONS 



$ 249,094.80 



364,710.83 



Total Expenditures 

Cash Balance, June 30, 1975 
General 
Federal Revenue Sharing 



354,760.06 
27,289.60 



11,252,860.97 



382,049.66 



Salaries 

Wages 

Expense 

Bonds 

Interest 

Refunds 



Cash Balance, June 30, 1975 

Total, Water Department 
Grand Total Expenditures 



WATER DEPARTMENT 

225.00 

35,203.42 

58,230.21 

32,000.00 

5,875.00 

245.28 



131,778.91 
11,380.56 

143,159.47 
$11,778,070.10 



51 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1975 



GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



Cash: 
General 
General P. 
Water 



L. 92-512 



Surplus Cash Investments 



ASSETS 

$ 354,760.06 
27,289.60 
11,380.56 



Ivances for Petty Cash 




Collector 


20.00 


Treasurer 


100.00 


Police 


25.00 


School Administration 


50.00 


School Instruction 


150.00 


Air Force School 


150.00 


Air Force School Cafeteria 


30.00 


Library 


15.00 


Education Study #23 


50.00 


Recreation 


100.00 



$ 393,430.22 
700,000.00 



690.00 



Accounts Receivable: 

Taxes 

Levy of 1970 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1971 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1972 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1973-74 
Personal 
Real Estate 

Levy of 1974-75 
Personal 
Real Estate 



105.20 

48.96 
108.80 

96.33 
114.00 

44.38 
8,002.06 

223.09 

34,934.20 



43,677.02 



52 



Motor Vehicle Excise 

Levy of 1971 $ 434.14 

Levy of 1972 517.00 

Levy of 1973 808.51 

Levy of 1974 9,013.73 

Levy of 1975 25,620.46 



Levy of 1971 


7,390.24 


Levy of 1973-74 


595.62 


Underestimates 1974-75 




MAPC 




Overdrawn 




Air Force School Cafeteria 


73.87 


Codman Community Farms 


83.29 


Employee Deductions, 




Union Dues 


1.00 


Pierce House 


147.00 



$ 39,393.84 



Special Taxes 

Farm Animal Excise 2.00 

Tax Titles § Possessions 

Tax Titles 3,104.99 

Departmental 

Board of Health - Garbage 

Collection 277.15 

Water 

Rates 2,966.08 

Aid to Highways 

State 8,053.83 

County 5,185.96 

13,239.79 

Loans Authorized 

Conservation 80,780.00 

Unprovided for or Overdrawn Accounts 
Overlay Deficits 



7,985.86 



438.48 



305.16 



$ 1,286,290.59 



53 



Debt Accounts 



Assets 



Net Funded or Fixed Debt 
Inside Debt Limit 
General 

Outside Debt Limit 
General 

Public Service Enter- 
prise 



Total 



$ 430,000.00 
100,000.00 



$ 1,104,220.00 



530,000.00 
2,920,510.59 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1975 



GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



LIABILITIES 


1 AND RESERVES 


Temporary Loans 




In anticipation of Serial 




Loans 




Payroll Deductions 




Insurance 


5.16 


Blue Cross/Blue Shield 


276.26 


Agency 




County Dog Licenses 


1,315.30 


Sale of dogs 


9.00 


Deputy Fees 


31.10 


Unidentified Federal Tax 




Refund 


83.43 


Swimming Pool 


12,029.14 


Militzer Land 


11,030.00 


Codman Barn 


499.01 


Recreation, Special Needs 


548.32 


Garland Cabin 


5,997.55 


Codman Trustees, Swimming 




Pool 


855.71 


Employee Deductions 


7,365.42 



$ 29,750.00 



281.42 



39,763.98 



54 



Tailings 

Unclaimed Checks $ 878.71 
Unidentified Auditors' 

Receipts 9.07 



Trust Fund Income 






DeCordova School Eqpt. Fund 


1 


,268.69 


Grammar School Fund 




81.14 


Federal Grants 






Bureau of Library Extension, 






Title II 




14.47 


Title III, P.L. 230 


1 


,756.96 


Title VI 74-157-013 P. L. 






91-230 




333.80 


Title VI 75-157-018 


1 


,222.56 


Air Force School 


98 


,471.37 



State Grants 




Special Education Grant 


12,970.00 


Mass. Bicentennial Dev. 




Art. C686 


551.00 


Revolving Funds 




Lunch Program 


2,922.52 


Metco - Chapter 506 


76,558.02 


Appropriation Balances 




Revenue 




General 




Overestimates 1974-75 




State 




State Parks 


281.79 


MBTA 


152.99 


Metropolitan Air Pollution 




Control 


96.50 


Special Education 


3,000.00 


County 




County Tax 


17,702.85 


County Hospital 


.01 



$ 887.78 



1,349.83 



101,799.16 



13,521.00 



79,480.54 



113,995.29 



3,531.28 



17,702.86 



55 



Receipts Reserved for 
Appropriations 

County Dog Fund $ 1,751.07 

Cemetery Improvement Fund 33,934.19 
State 

Aid to Libraries 5,675.26 

Conservation Land Reimb. 109,099.35 
Highway Aid, Ch. 825, 

Sec. 4 23,077.00 

$ 173,536.87 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 4,105.60 

Overlays Reserved for Abatements 

Levy of 1972 473.12 

Levy of 1974-75 24,969.17 

25,442.29 

Revenue Reserved Until Collected 

Motor Vehicle Excise 39,393.84 

Farm Animal Excise 2.00 

Tax Title 159.60 

Departmental 277.15 

Water 2,966.08 

Aid to Highways 13,239.79 

56,038.46 

Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 690.00 

Surplus Revenue 

General 580,551.28 

P. L. 92-512 25,739.69 

Water 18,123.26 

624,414.23 



Debt Accounts 

Liabilities and Reserves 

Serial Loans 

Inside Debt Limit 

Fire § Police Station 15,000.00 

Land Acquisition 444,220.00 

School 475,000.00 

Municipal 70,000.00 

Swimming Pool 100,000.00 



Outside Debt Limit 

School 430,000.00 

Water 100,000.00 



$1,286,290.59 



1,104,220.00 



530,000.00 



Total $2,920,510.59 

56 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

J. Thomas Franklin 

Joseph W. Howard 

Douglas M. Burckett, Chairman 

During the year 1975, the Board has been involved in making studies 
relative to full and equalized valuation as decreed by the Massachusetts 
Supreme Court on December 24, 1974. As now programmed, full and equal- 
ized valuation would be implemented as of January 1st, 1977, which would 
show up in the tax bills for fiscal year 1977-1978. The Board is now 
working on data for presentation to the Town, which will inform all prop- 
erty owners of the change in valuations from the present figures to those 
proposed for 1977, dependent, of course, on such changes in properties as 
may subsequently occur during calendar year 1976. This information 
will be presented in March or April, with a series of meetings scheduled 
after publication, so that property owners may have an opportunity to dis- 
cuss their assessments with the Board, if necessary. Concurrently, the 
Board will present information on classifications of land which may be 
of interest to holders of larger acreages, these being uses for farming, 
forestry and conservation restrictions. 

In connection with the implementation of full and equalized valuation, 
the Board has changed its records regarding owners of more than one parcel 
of land. In the future, starting with the 1976-77 tax bills, each par- 
cel will be billed separately. 

Just a word to let you know that the State and County are increasing 
their bite on the town each year. The net result of State and County 
assessments and State receipts amounted to an increase in our last tax rate 
of about fifty cents. 

Listed below are some of the more important regulations, with which 
many of you should be familiar: 

1. The status of property on January 1 is the determinant of the 
tax in any year. 

2. All real estate and personal property tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by October 1 of the year involved. 

3. Motor vehicle and trailer excise tax abatement applications 
must be filed with the Board by July 1 of the year succeeding 
the year involved. If cars are changed during the year, it 
is the taxpayer's responsibility to file an abatement applica- 
tion. 

4. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41, of the General Laws, as amen- 
ded, provides for certain real estate tax exemptions for tax- 
payers who meet certain age, financial, etc. qualifications. 
Additional information may be obtained from the Assessors' 
office. All applications under Clause 41 must be filed with 
the Board by December 15 of the year involved. 

57 



5. Chapter 59, Section 5, Clause 41A, provides for the deferral of 
real estate tax payments in certain instances. Additional in- 
formation may be obtained from the Assessors' office. All ap- 
plications under this clause must be filed by December 15 of the 
year involved. 

6. Veterans with 10% or more disability, holders of Purple Heart 
awards, and others, may qualify for a partial exemption. Addi- 
tional information about these exemptions may be obtained from 
the Assessors' office. 



1975-1976 Recapitulation 

Appropriations to be raised by taxation $3,789,939.09 

Appropriations to be taken from available funds 535,391.32 

Overlay deficits of previous years 7,985.86 

Amount certified for tax title foreclosures 3,104.99 

Offsets to Cherry Sheet estimated receipts 233,637.23 

State assessments 116,730.47 

County assessments 210,671.08 

Overlay current fiscal year 33,852.04 

Gross amount to be raised $ 4,931,312.08 

Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

Estimated receipts from State 833,801.22 

Over-estimates for prior years, State § County 18,234.14 

Local estimated receipts 339,483.00 

Amounts voted to be taken from available funds 535,391.32 

Total estimated receipts and available funds 1,726,909.68 

Amount to be raised by taxation 3,204,402.40 

$4,931,312.08 



Total valuation: 



Personal Property $ 4,237,930 at $63.50 $ 269,108.55 

Real Estate 46,225,100 at $63.50 2,955,293.85 

$ 50,463,030 $3,204,402.40 



Tax rate per thousand (1975-1976): 

School rate $38.10 

General rate 25.40 $63.50 

58 



O 

CM 


o 

00 


vO 

en 


o 

o 


to 
to 


vO 

o 


00 

to 


o 

CM 


O 


O 

o 


Tf 


o 
o 


LO 


to 




LO 

o 


00 

o 


00 


■* 


en 


CM 

o 
o 

oo* 


•<* 


1 "t 

1 to 

en 

to 


to 

CM 

CM 


CM 


"3- 

to 


LO 


00 

o 

00 


to 

o 
en 


o 

CM 

\D 

0C 

cm 



O 


en 


LO 


,_| 


CM 


o 


00 


a 


i—i 


vO 


o 


en 


r- 


o 


vo 


sD 


















o 


i— 1 


r- 


•*■ 


r*. 


* 


LO 


en 


to 


tj- 


LO 


00 


ti- 




<tf 


CT> 






^d- 


CM 


i— ( 




1—1 





CM 


LO 


o 


LO 


LO 


CM 


00 


CM 


CM 


o 


■^t 


LO 


LO 


eg 


o to 


CM 


vc 


CM 


rf 


CM 


en 


vO 


en 


■-< 


CM 


to 


00 


•"3- 


3 "J- 


CM 


LO 


to 


L0 


rH 


vo 


en 


vO 


CM 


vO 


n- 


,_, 


r-- 


H \D 


to 


r-H 




LO 


00 


to 


en 


LO 


i-H 


to 


00 


VO 


to 


CM 


to 






00 


vO 




i— H 


■<* 


vO 


r^ 


vO 


to 


to 






























M 


vO 






o 


LO 






^ 


LO 

en 


en 


^ 


■^ 


CM 



o 


r> 


o 


to 


r- 


o 


o 


OC 


h» 


CM 


r^ 


CM 


o 


t 
















o 


r- 


CM 


LO 


o 


vO 


en 


LO 


vO 


to 


CM 


i— i 




to 


CM 


to 


O 


en 


LO 




iH 



o 


H3 


»— LO 


a) 


o r- 


P 


uj en 


p 


_i i-i 


<H 


_i i 


1 


o r- 


o 


en 


u 



vO 

to 


o 


OC 

en 








to 

LO 


00 

o 


oc 








vO 

en 


LO 
LO 
CM 





OC 


i— ( 


LO 


o 


oc 


r*. 


t". 


CM 


o 


O 












vO 


Tf 


vO 


en 


en 


^r 


to 


i-H 


to 


to 


i—i 


i-H 


00 


vO 


t> 












00 


t*. 


""J- 


^r 




vO 


i-H 









rt o 

i-H to 



o 


^ 


CM 


to 


en 


CM 


LO 


00 


00 


to 


to 


CM 


en 


CM 
















oo 


en 


00 


vO 


CM 


rt 


to 


o 


LO 


r^ 


en 


to 


CM 




r-H 




to 




to 

LO 







o 


■*t 


r» 


vO 


l-H 


to 


to 


vO 










^r 


vO 


^- 


00 


o 


CM 


vO 


vO 


en 


CM 


to 


"* 










M 


vO 
L0 




1-1 







p 




P 




a, 


c 




Oh 


























$H 




^ 




o 


< 




o 


























a> 




o 


<u 


u 




a> 


U 


i-H 
























P-c 




a, 


p 


cl 


E 


p 


CL 


rt 
























o 




o 


03 




C 


03 




6 




















o 


o 


H 


o 


u 


P 




rt 


P 




•H 




















p 


P 


cu 


♦j 


CL, 


(7) 


nJ 


Ul, 


to 


aj 


c 




















a} 


o3 




rt 




UJ 


c 




UJ 


C 


< 




















«J 


fJ 


l-H 


p 


t—4 




o 


, — , 




o 


















u 


^ 


n 


M 


rt 


c/> 


rt 




VI 






to 


1 












V 


<u 


o 


o 


UJ 


UJ 


c 


w 


C 


rt 


U 


trt 


rt 


^1 


<u 


<D 


<u 


<u 


<o 


bC 


60 


p 


p 






o 




o 


<D 


<u 


O 


<u 


a; 


rt 


w 


w 


t/5 


V) 


w 


rt 


rt 


03 


03 


i — i 


T— | 


t/) 


i-H 


trt 


a: 


a. 


G 


OC 


a. 


u. 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


•H 


X5 


X) 


3: 


3= 


03 


03 


^ 


rt 


JH 














O 


O 


o 


o 


u 


u 


?H 






S 


<D 


<u 


<u 


0) 


•* 


"■d- 


vO 


LO 


LO 


LO 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


rt 


rt 


•^t 


LO 


oi 


cd 


CL 


as 


a, 


r-* 


h. 


v— ' 


r^ 


t^ 


r^ 


u 


w 


u 


w 


UJ 


u 


U 


rs 


r- 


o 


_l 


l-H 


cm 


CM 


to 


to 


^3- 


Tt 


^t 


tj- 


^, 


CM 


to 


rf 


LO 


'd- 


LO 


to 


^r 


t*» 


r«» 


r- 


r- 


t^ 


r*» 


r^ 


r^ 


r» 


r^ 


t*» 


r>. 


r^ 


r^ 


r-- 


r- 


r^ 


I-- 


r- 


r-~ 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 


en 



59 



c 
o 


o 
o 


o 

o 


CM 


tO 
CM 


to 


o 
o 


O 
O 


o 
o 


o 

c 


o 
oc 
oc 


o 

CM 


LO 


lo 


LO 
LO 
CM 


o 


to 

<7> 


00 


o 

LO 


1/1 
1/] 

r- 



X 

•"in 

O o> 

.-t 

OC I 
O rr 



tl 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


P 


• 


• 


• 


P 


o 


o 


1/1 


•H 


00 


CM 


Is. 


1 


00 




sO 


o 


00 




^T 


a 


1— 1 




rj 



X P P 

CO 

POO 

p p 
o 

P T) T3 

T3 C C 
o bi bo 

bo w </> 

•H (/) l/> 

i/> cO cO 



o r~- 

C \ 

cO o 

.-h to 

























p 


M 


•H 
























i/> 


2 


X 
























•H 


P 


P 
























43 




























P 


tp 
O 


<P 

o 
























«p 




























O 


P 

3 


p 

3 
























P 


o 


o 
























3 




























O 


o 

CM 


ro 
























O 


• 


• 




m 




















\0 


t*« 


oc 


(h 


3 


















0) 


• 


kO 


M 


a> 


o 


















</> 


en 


o 


rj 


+-> 


a) 


















3 


LO 


* 


* 


co 


c 


















O 


i— i 


^r 


to 


g, 


rt 


1— 1 
















X 


*e- v> 






cO 












if) 




s 










t— < 


p 










m 


P 




p. 


tp <P <W 


M 


<D 


c 










p 


O 




cO 


O 


O 


o 


c 


o 


a> 










c 


J 




PL, 








O 


(/> 


OC 










rt 








P 


P 


p 




• H 












H 


>, 




c 


c 


c 


c 


P 


2 


p 










p. 


£ 


V) 


cO 


3 


9 


fl 


o 




c 










CO 


CD 


c 


i 


O 


c 


c 





p. 


CO 










s 


P 


o 


E 


1 


i 


c 


a> 


u 












o 


•H 


o 


cO 


a 


c 


p 


-a 










T3 


E 


J 


u 








o 


cO 


X 










C 


CD 






V 


0) 


o 


u 


S 


X 






■* 


LO 


cO 


U 


1— 1 


<p 


X 


X 


x: 








P 




l»» 


r-» 






CO 


o 


H 


p 


H 


LO 


LO 


LO 


M 




I 


i 


</> 


<P 


P, 










r*. 


t^- 


C-. 


O 


CM 


to 


■«*■ 


T3 


O 


•H 


i-H 








1 


1 


i 


M 


r^ 


r^ 


f* 


C 




o 


CO 








tj- 


T 


■«* 


B 


en 


o> 


CT> 


cO 


a> 


•H 


P 


* 


* 


* 


r^ 


t^ 


r^- 


P 








E 




c 


c 




* 


* 


O 


o> 


<3\ 


C 








<U 


cO 


1 


o 






* 


iH 


«— 1 


iH 










Q 


co 


Otf 









60 



Protection of Persons and Property 



FIRE AND POLICE DEPARTMENT 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr., Chief 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The following is a list of activities of the Lincoln Police 
Department for the year 1975. 

Arrests by the Lincoln Police 87 

Violations of Motor Vehicle Law 612 

Warnings 212 

Complaints 378 

Arrests 22 

Total Fines Paid $10,588.00 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Accidents Reported 301 

Occupants Injured 125 

Occupants Killed 3 

Burglaries 60 

Larcenies Investigated 226 

Dog Complaints 801 

Other Animal Complaints 346 

Ambulance Calls 198 

Assist Fire Department 97 

Listing and Stolen Checks (Motor Vehicle) 3,307 

Alarms Responded 727 

Alarm Malfunction 1,875 

Miscellaneous Items Recorded 32,950 

Sergeant Davis and Inspector Ziegler continue their studies at 
Northeastern University. Officer Fitzgerald and Officer Finan con 
tinue their studies at Middlesex Community College. 

The Lincoln Police Department is continuing to qualify members 
as Emergency Medical Technicians (EMT), as required by recent State 



61 



law. At the present time three officers are qualified and one is 
presently attending training at Emerson Hospital. 

The Auxiliary Police Department continues to be active under 
the direction of Civil Defense Director Al Sturgis and Officer 
Richard Hallett. Instructions in all phases of police activity 
are given at their monthly meetings. Their assistance was greatly 
appreciated on April 19th in handling traffic in connection with 
the Bicentennial celebration. 

Traffic conditions on April 19th came as a pleasant surprise 
to all agencies involved and to residents of the Town of Lincoln. 
Parking problems were experienced on the evening of April 18th but 
they were under control before dawn on the 19th. Traffic on the 
19th ran smoothly and there were no reported tie-ups or heavy con- 
gestion. The smooth traffic operation was the result of two years 
of preparation by area towns under the direction of the Massachu- 
setts Civil Defense Agency and the Massachusetts Department of Pub- 
lic Safety. All persons involved deserve a "Well done". 

In August the department received a fully equipped cruiser 
from the Governor's Highway Safety Bureau. The vehicle was ob- 
tained at no cost to the town through a grant submitted by the de- 
partment for the purpose of improving the safety on the roads 
within the Town of Lincoln. 

As a result of the new Traffic Rules and Regulations adopted 
by the town, the department started to issue parking tickets in 
April. Over two thousand tickets have been issued with all fines 
returned to the Town of Lincoln. The greatest problem areas in 
illegal parking have been the Lake Walden area and the conservation 
area on Route 117. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

During 1975 the Fire Department answered a total of 580 calls 
These calls come under the following: 

Aircraft in trouble 16 

Brush or woods 26 

Outside burning 9 

Smoke Investigation 18 

M/V Accident 179 

Water Problems 22 

Wires down or arcing 16 

62 



Lockouts 25 

Building Fires 31 

M/V Fires 53 

Assist Ambulance (Medical Emergency) 67 

Miscellaneous and Special Services 91 

False or Accidental 24 

Mutual Aid 2 

Bomb Threats 1_ 

580 

During 1975 the Fire Department inspected and issued permits 



for: 



Agricultural Permits 385 

Gasoline Storage Permits 2 

Oil Tank Permits 9 

Oil Burner Permits 9 

Blasting Permits 6 

Rocket Permits 4 

Building Fire Inspections 42 

457 

In August Frank W. Putnam, III, was appointed permanent Deputy 
Chief. He brings with him over 20 years of fire service experi- 
ence. 

In October Firefighter Arthur Cotoni graduated from the seven 
week recruit course at the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy. His 
appointment as a permanent firefighter is effective 1 January, 1976. 

Three new members have been added to the call firefighters 
list. They are: 

Peter Torode, Donald Bardsley and Gregory Richardson. 

Many permanent and call firefighters successfully completed a 
short course in Aircraft Crash Rescue Familiarization given by 
Army Aviators from Ft. Devens Army Airfield. 

Regularly scheduled inspections and drills were conducted at 
the public schools. Public buildings, the Lincoln Rest Home, and 
all businesses were given periodic inspections throughout the year. 

The new pumper, Engine 5, was delivered and put into service 
in March. 



63 



Firefighters Arthur Cotoni and George Thomas graduated from 
Emergency Medical Technician School in August. 

Three call firefighters were promoted to the rank of Lieuten- 
ant - Joseph Cotoni, Sr., George Thomas and John O'Loughlin. 

Engine 4, which prior to this time was used strictly as a 
brush fire truck, has now been equipped as a rescue pumper. The 
mini-pumper concept, found to be very effective in other communi- 
ties, was instituted in November and is working well. Under this 
concept a small, lightweight, all terrain vehicle is used for res- 
ponding to many of the calls which the duty crew can handle, thus 
saving wear and tear on the larger heavy duty engines, which are 
slower and harder to maneuver in a community such as Lincoln. Even 
though Engine 4 has a greater limitation than the standard mini- 
pumper due to smaller pump capacity and less water, it is proving 
to be a faster, more efficient piece of apparatus for response by 
the two man duty crew for motor vehicle accidents, special service 
calls, medical emergencies, car fires, small brush fires, etc. 

New rescue equipment put into service this year was instrumen- 
tal in the saving of a man's life during extrication from a truck 
accident. The department's EMT's had many opportunities to put 
their specialized training to use during the year and the depart- 
ment received many letters of commendation for their high degree 
of professionalism. 

A concentrated effort by the members of the department toward 
Fire Prevention Education was instituted this past year. Fire- 
fighters of the department, under the direction of Deputy Chief Put- 
nam, visited all the public and private schools in town during Fire 
Prevention Week. Their visit was well received by students and 
faculty alike. Also during Fire Prevention Week an open house was 
held at the Fire Station, with displays and demonstrations. The 
department wishes to express its thanks for the public interest as 
demonstrated by the sizeable attendance. 

The Fire Department wishes to remind all parents of the TOT 
FINDER program. Anyone wishing information may stop in or call at 
the Fire Station. 

A second Fire Department Chaplain was appointed this year. He 
is Father George Murphy of St. Joseph's Church. 

Raymond Barnes, one of the town's communicators, was named 
official Fire Department Photographer. 



64 



The department personnel now consists of: 

1 Deputy Chief (permanent) 
1 Captain (permanent) 
3 Firefighters (permanent) 
35 Firefighters (call) 

For the permanent personnel this is an everyday profession. 
For the call firefighters it is an avocation. When the alarm 
sounds, no matter what time of day or night and no matter what the 
weather, these men respond. Recognition of the many years of de- 
voted service to the Town of Lincoln which these men represent is 
made with grateful appreciation. 



CIVIL DEFENSE AND DISASTER PREPAREDNESS 
Alanson H. Sturgis, Jr., Director 



Except for the activities associated with the April 19th Bi- 
centennial celebration, the year was a quiet one for this Agency. 
We had to replace one of our two radios because of its age. In 
this we were assisted materially by a financial grant from the 
DeCordova Museum. All our communications have functioned satis- 
factorily. 

During the year Larry Hallett retired as Civil Defense Commun- 
ications Officer. Larry served the Town in many capacities over 
the years, and I am very grateful to him for his help. The Select 
men appointed Eric Williams as Communications Officer. Eric is 
anxious to be of help to the radio amateurs in town, and has run a 
class designed to help in passing FCC license tests. 

Looking to traffic problems on April 19th, this Agency, work- 
ing with the Police Department, re-activated the Auxiliary Police, 
an organization which had been dormant since the early 1950' s. We 
enrolled twenty persons, gave them some training in traffic control) 
their legal powers and "Do's and Don't' s in dealing with the public 
We purchased minimal quantities of uniform items for them. Seven- 
teen of the Auxiliaries were available for duty on the 19th, and al: 
were used. They were deployed mainly on fixed traffic posts, but 
some were assigned as the second man in the cruisers manned by reg- 
ular officers. 

65 



The cold, wet weather combined with forecasts of horrendous 
traffic jams to keep problems to a minimum. It was a far easier 
day than any of us anticipated, for which we were duly grateful. 
That evening I heard a news broadcaster say that the towns of Con- 
cord, Lincoln and Lexington "admitted to being over-prepared". I 
don't feel that over-preparation is something to be "admitted". 
I think that the three towns should have felt very comfortable 
about the fact that they had the foresight and capability of being 
prepared for major problems whether they arose or not. 

As the year ends, I am working with the Police Department to 
set up a training schedule for the Auxiliaries. Already a number 
have passed certification tests for Cardio-Pulmonary Resuscitation 
(CPR) . I hope that we can maintain their interest in working with 
the Police in future emergencies, as well as assisting in routine 
patrols. I want to thank them for their help during the year. 



66 



INSPECTORS OF BUILDINGS, WIRING AND PLUMBING 

Ernest L. Johnson, Building Inspector 

William M. Dean, Wiring and Fire Alarm Inspector 

Russell J. Dixon, Plumbing and Gas Inspector 



The 1975 State Uniform Building code has now been in existence 
for a year. Over 200 amendments in the form of deletions and 
additions are now making it more confusing, but somewhat more work- 
able. Recertification by inspection prior to selling or renting 
your home or apartment is no longer required. Fire alarm systems 
are still mandatory with new construction, but the rules and regula- 
tions are now under further study by the State Building Code Com- 
mission. 

A copy of the complete code with amendments is available for 
reference at the Town Hall. Sections from the code may be ordered 
and purchased separately, if desired. 

During the past year, Dan Murphy, our plumbing inspector for 
many years, retired. Dan has been of great assistance to the 
building department and to the Town as a whole over a long period of 
time. Thanks from all of us, Dan, for a job very well done. We 
may still call on you for advice. 

Russell Dixon joins the building department as our new plumbing 
inspector. For several years, Russ has assisted Dan, and joins the 
department with many years of experience in plumbing, heating and 
gas fitting. 

Bill Dean, our most able wiring inspector, has agreed to take 
on additional duties as fire alarm inspector. 

Construction work at the low and moderate income housing projec 
has been progressing slowly. Many problems have occurred during 
the past year, causing considerable concern to all those involved. 
The building department pledges to cooperate fully by acting immedi 
ately on any problems that may arise in connection with this projec 
With a concentrated effort by the parties involved, the building de 
partment hopes to be able to issue occupancy certifications during 
the middle months of this year. 

Farrar Pond Village has begun construction on the second clust< 
of 23 condominiums. Unofficially, it is believed plans are now 
under way to begin construction on the third cluster some time thi: 
summer. 

67 



The shopping center next to the housing project has made good 
progress in spite of weather conditions. It appears now that 
certification for certain occupancies could occur early this summer. 

During the past year, over 900 structural inspections were made 
on all projects. Approximately 350 wiring and 300 plumbing and gas 
fitting inspections keep us all quite busy. 

Income from all permit fees and certifications (that are still 
required) totalled $15,448.00. 

1. Building permits issued in 1975: 

New residential 7 

2- family apartments 2 

Additions § alterations 26 
Foundations for relocated 

buildings 3 

Sheds df garages 11 

Swimming pools 2 

Greenhouses 3 

Fence 1 

Amphitheater 1 

Condominium units 23 

Carports 6 

Shopping center buildings 3 

Parking lot 1 

Tents (temporary use) 3 

Buildings demolished 3 

95 

Inspections 910 
Building fees collected $7,831.00 

2. Plumbing § gas fitting permits 

issued in 1975: 142 

Inspections 300 

Plumbing § gas fees collected $1,940.00 

3. Wiring permits issued in 1975: 151 
Inspections 350 
Wiring fees collected $5,577.00 

4. Fire Alarm permits issued 
in 1975: 10 

Alarm fees collected $ 100.00 

Total fees collected $15,448.00 

68 



Health and Welfare 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Joan M. Comstock 

Herbert A. Haessler, M. D. 

Gordon A. Donaldson, M. D., Chairman 



At the Town election in March, Dr. Herbert Haessler was success- 
fully re-seated as a member of the Board of Health. Shortly there- 
after, at its first meeting, the Board made a number of annual ap- 
pointments: Miss Cheryl Ciechowski, Agent; Mr. George Wells, Burial 
Agent; Dr. Alden Russell, Inspector of Slaughtering, and Mrs. Paul 
Marsh, Inspector of Animals. In addition, Mr. Vincent DeAmicis was 
named Dog Officer. During the course of the year it became neces- 
sary to make several changes in our staff. At mid-year Miss Ciechow- 
ski returned to college, and Mrs. Maria Pugatch from the Emerson Hos- 
pital Home Nursing Service was appointed to fill her post. After 
the great loss to the Town of George Wells, Mrs. Howard Snelling 
assumed the role of Burial Agent. And earlier in the year, Mr. 
William Desjean was appointed by the Selectmen as a replacement in 
the job of Dog Officer. Several licenses were granted during the 
year, as required by law, and numerous inspections were made of rest- 
aurants, cider presses, substandard dwellings, and our one piggery. 

In recent years, the time and energy of the Board has become in- 
creasingly involved in the inspection and supervision of sub-surface 
sewage disposal systems for dwellings. All plans for sewage dis- 
posal plants are reviewed by our consulting firm, Cleverdon, Varney § 
Pike; and during the process of the actual construction of the sys- 
tem three inspections in the field are made at specified intervals. 
In a dozen or more instances when "trouble spots" were apparent and 
on several occasions when a variance was being considered, the Board 
itself inspected the proposed area of disposal. Early in the sum- 
mer a decision was made to remove the cost for these inspections 
from the general umbrella of the building permit fee, and a flat 
charge of $75.00 for any single building sewage system plant, re- 
gardless of size or cost, is now made. For larger systems, in- 
volving multiple unit housing, commercial developments, etc., where 
more time will be required of our consultants, the charges will be 
based on the actual hourly cost of the Town sanitary engineer. 



69 



As the density of housing increases and high land for building 
purposes becomes exhausted, the State has also taken a renewed inter- 
est in protection of the environment. Although quoted in last 
year's report, Section 121 M, Chapter 190, of the Acts of 1975, is 
of such importance to Lincoln that it is worthy of repetition: "No 
sub-surface sewage leaching system or septic tank shall be con- 
structed within 100 feet of any private well, or within 100 feet of 
any known source of public surface water supply or tributary there- 
to. No sub-surface sewage leaching system or septic tank shall be 
constructed within 75 feet in the case of a single or duplex build- 
ing, or 100 feet in the case of a commercial building or of a multi- 
ple dwelling (as defined in Section 1 of Chapter 152 B) of the nor- 
mal Spring high water level of any great pond, pond, stream, brook, 
river, surface or sub- surface drain, swamp, or wetlands, or of any 
mean high water for tidal water, without the prior written approval 
of the Department of Environmental Quality Engineering". It is 
obvious that the determination of the maximum high water table level 
is of prime importance, and this level must be identified in the 
Spring of the year at the time of high water, in March or April. 
Disposal fields may not be constructed in areas where the maximum 
ground water elevation is less than four feet below the bottom of 
the leaching trench. This usually means that test pits must be dug 
to a depth of 7 or 8 feet. If the disposal field is to be placed 
on filled ground, the fill must be of a particular type and either 
compacted or allowed to settle for a period of six months. Although 
it is not possible for the Lincoln Beard of Health to modify these 
requirements, we do hope to provide variances to promote year-around 
building. In the case of sewage systems, planned on land which is 
obviously high and dry, variances may, at the risk of the owner, be 
granted in anticipation of determining the high water table at the 
time of year stipulated by State law. 

Percolation testing is also important, of course, but only rela- 
tively so. Such testing may be done at any time. The only re- 
strictions are that they may not be done in frozen ground, or done 
in test holes which have been allowed to remain open to the atmos- 
phere for more than three days. The rate of water fall in the test 
hole must be greater than 1 inch in 30 minutes. 

In June the Board completed its first year contract with the 
Emerson Hospital Home Care Service. We believe that under the able 
supervision of Mrs. R. Faye Collins, R. N., superior nursing service 
has been provided in both schools and homes. The conscientious 
caring of staff nurse, Miss Cheryl Ciechowski, was followed in the 
fall of the year by a similar degree of commitment by Mrs. Maria 
Pugatch. Details of the function of these nurses in the school, 
home, and for the Board of Health itself, were described in last 

70 



year's report. A total of 1,160 hours in school nursing was pro- 
vided by the public health nurse herself during the year. In 
December, Mrs. Robert Whatley, our part-time Health Aide, was sup- 
plemented by the addition of a second part-time Aide, Mrs. Richard 
Russes. These hard-working individuals are vital to the school 
health program, in relieving the Registered Nurse of some of the 
paper work and important first aid care which does not require her 
expertise. The staff nurse is in town every day during school 
hours, and can be reached at the Health Unit, Smith School (259-9407) 

The main thrust of the Emerson Hospital Home Care program is in 
bedside nursing of the ill at home. Individuals recover more ef- 
fectively in the home environment than in an institution. A total 
of 552 visits to 52 patients were made, 60% of these by the staff 
nurse herself, and the remainder by Home Health Aides. A wide 
variety of illnesses were attended, from maternity cases to cancer, 
heart disease, and stroke in the elderly. The expense of these 
visits is borne by the patient in some instances, or by Medicare, 
Medicaid, Blue Cross, third party payers, and in a few instances, by 
the Pierce Fund. 

The third phase of this nursing service is for the Board of 
Health itself. Follow-up visits are made to homes of premature in- 
fants and children with communicable disease. In October a Hyper- 
tension Screening Clinic was conducted by the Service, and another 
for Hypertension and for Cancer are planned for the coming Spring. 
The Well-Child Clinic, after many years, has been discontinued be- 
cause of a lack of clientele. Dr. John A. V. Davies is owed a 
great debt of gratitude by the Town for his devoted, expert and char- 
itable work as pediatrician to the Clinic for the past thirty-eight 
years. He has been responsible for the conduct of this Clinic since' 
its inception in June, 1938, and it has been Lincoln's fortune to 
have had a man of national recognition as its own pediatrician. 

The Board, in part because of its own aging, has become increas- 
ingly aware of the need for caring for the older citizenry of socie- 1 
ty today. In the future we hope to share in the responsibility for 
providing this care with the "Lincoln Council on Aging", now in its 
formational stages, and with the proposed "Regional Home Care Corpor- 
ation". 

Our annual budget continues to rise modestly. Monetary infla- 
tion of the times, and the addition of a second school Health Aide, 
account for most of this increase. In cooperation with the sur- 
rounding several towns, contributions are made, based on Town popu- 
lation, for the basic administration of the Emerson Hospital Home 

71 



Care Service and the Middlesex Central Mental Health Association -- 
both important to our townspeople. It should further be noted that 
several of the items listed as expenses in our budget are returned 
to the Town in payment for services provided, such as sanitary en- 
gineer inspections, the garbage collection service, and the Dog 
Clinic. 

Again, the Board remains grateful to our volunteers, too numer- 
ous to name, for their unselfish help in our various projects. With- 
out them, the school clinics, in particular, would not have suc- 
ceeded. 



72 



Planning and Public Works 



PLANNING BOARD 

James D. Birkett 

Robert C. Brannen 

Ann P. Brown 

David M. Donaldson 

Susan M. Brooks, Chairman 



As we look back over 1975 we realize that a great many hours, 
in fact most of our time, was spent on projects which, for one rea- 
son or another, have not yet taken shape. In some cases this has } 
been attributable to the slump in building activity throughout the 
country; in others problems arose from the nature of the property 
to be developed. The 40-acre tract belonging to Mr. Henry Warner, 
under option to Scott Properties, is a case in point. Although the 
developer reworked his plans repeatedly and met frequently with the 
Board, the large areas of wetland and difficulties in planning suit- 
able access were such that a definitive plan had not been submitted 
by the end of the year. 

We are still invited from time to time by the Secretary of 
Transportation to restate our opinion with regard to Route 2. There 
has been little change in the Planning Board's views on this; specifi 
cally that any new road should be along a northern alignment, that 
houses severely impacted by the new road should be relocated, with 
firm assurances that the present road will be downgraded, narrowed 
to reduce speed and improve aesthetics, and revert to a Town road. 
At present the action appears to center with the Department of the 
Interior. They are committed by Act of Congress to proceed with the 
creation of the Minute Man National Park. In order for this to hap 
pen, they must close Route 2A, throwing all the traffic onto Route I 
Not only would this require a long and costly connector road, but the 
present Route 2 would be unable to carry the extra load and remain 
within safety standards, important factors in the determination of 
future road alignment. There is apparently such a shortage of fund 
at present that it seems unlikely that anything beyond some safety 
modifications to the present route will be undertaken for a long time 

The Board accepted the final plans for subdivision of Mr. 
Black's property, with access from Page Road. There will be seven 

73 



lots. Property belonging to Mr. Howard Stevenson, on Tower Road, 
has been divided into five lots. One of these contains his exist- 
ing house, and another has been generously given to the Lincoln Land 
Conservation Trust, with a twenty foot easement for access from Tower 
Road. However, there is a restriction at present against building 
on the other three, since a satisfactory sewage disposal plan is 
still to be worked out. A twelve acre parcel at the south end of 
Lincoln Road, the former property of Mrs. Robert Gray, has been 
divided into two lots served by a minor street. We are grateful to 
the new owners for having granted a conservation easement across an 
edge of the property for walking and riding. 

The 27 units in Phase I of Farrar Pond Village have been sold, 
and work has begun on 23 units in Phase II. Although there are 
other properties in Town being planned for subdivision on which R-3 
would be the most suitable treatment from a point of view of land 
use, the Planning Board has respected its promise not to recommend 
any further such zoning until the impact of the present R-3 can be 
evaluated. 

The Bike Path Committee, under the chairmanship of Mrs. Alan 
Smith, has met monthly, with the happy result that the long awaited 
Master Plan for Bike Paths in Lincoln will be ready for the 1976 Town 
Meeting. The Path Committee has recommended to the Selectmen that 
funds be provided within the Highway Department budget for mainten- 
ance of the paths and for a suitable plow. 

Construction began on the site preparation for the commercial 
area in early summer and proceeded with such efficiency that a profuse 
planting of green trees and chrysanthemums was in place by Labor Day. 
Except for the landscaping, which has not yet been brought up to the 
Planning Board's requirements, the Board's role in both this enter- 
prise and Lincoln Woods is nearly complete. (Speaking of which, 
let's stop calling it the moderate income housing, which fifty per 
cent of it isn't.) 

The Planning Board made favorable recommendations to the Board 
of Appeals concerning eight petitions to create apartments in exist- 
ing houses or outbuildings, all of which were subsequently granted by 
that Board. This brings the total number of apartments granted under 
the bylaw as amended in 1972 to eighteen. A clause in this section 
of the bylaw reads: 

"SECTION VII. C. "The number of apartments permitted under 
subsection C of Section VII shall not ex- 
ceed ten percent of the total number of 

74 



single-family residences existing in the 
Town M 

It's not clear from this whether the ten per cent refers to apart- 
ments to be built subsequent to passage of the amendment or would 
include the considerable number of apartments already in existence. 
Town Counsel will be asked for a ruling on this. 

Some years ago the annual report of the Planning Board took 
the form of a Letter to Our Grandchildren. In it we attempted to 
describe the measures we were taking which would affect this Town, 
its' people and its' woods and its' fields during the time it is in 
our trust, with a view to leaving them a good town to live in. Per- 
haps it's now suitable that we render some sort of report to our 
forebears. How are we succeeding in fulfilling the hopes they had 
for their Town? Throughout its' history what we see is evidence 
of respect for the land, the individual, and the community as a 
whole. What they couldn't anticipate in the increased pressure on 
the land itself, as a stable farming community suddenly became a 
rapidly growing suburb. Since the health of the land is inextric- 
ably involved with our own, to plan wisely for its' use is a major 
responsibility of us all. 



75 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Barbara Barker 

Robert Jevon 

Peter Meenan 

Hans van Leer 

Elliott V. Grabill, Chairman 

Alice Pickman, Associate Member 
David Sykes, Associate Member 



The work load of this Board continued to grow during 1975. 
Twenty-one hearings were held. Thirteen applications were granted; 
nine of these were special permits, and four involved variances. 
Four applications were withdrawn by the petitioners after initial 
hearings were held. 

After additional hearings, the Hall matter, which has been 
the subject of litigation for some time, appears to have reached 
agreeable solution. This Board is supportive of the common sense 
result and the votes of the Planning Board which terminate the matter, 

As the work load has increased, more and more citizens of the 
Town have become involved in matters before the Board, and technical 
matters of process and communication have arisen. This Board has 
gone to some pains to work out routines of initial communications 
which will lead to prepared petitioners appearing at hearings at 
which all concerned Boards are present, both by report and in person. 

Many petitions require reports and positions by the Board of 
Health and the Planning Board. We are trying to work things out so 
that no application will be deferred because there has not been suf- 
ficient preparation. 

We do a lot of hard work, and we appreciate the fact that 
other Boards do a great deal more hard work. We believe that it is 
a privilege to be able to participate in this facet of Town govern- 
ment and try to be of service to the townspeople. They have a right 
to call on us, and it is our privilege to be available and ready to 
serve them whenever need arises. 



76 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

J. Quincy Adams 

Lydia H. Dane 

James DeNormandie 

Ronald H. Marcks 

William M. Preston 

Kemon Taschioglou 

Robert A. Lemire, Chairman 

Ruth Burke, Associate Member 



While continuing our ongoing land management and maintenance i 
programs, administering wetland regulations, participating in the 
Planning Board's subdivision process, and being involved in the 
Route 2 environmental impact study, the Commission devoted much of llf 
its time to the preparation of a definitive open space plan, ex- 
pected to be ready for publication in early 1976. Building on all! 
planning efforts to date, this open space plan identifies existing f t 
public and private conservation areas, wetlands, institutional land \ 
such as Drumlin Farm and Minute Man National Historical Park, and pri 
vately owned land of conservation interest based on the five follow- ■ 
ing criteria: 

(1) Place in Lincoln Land Conservation Plan: its positi 
and importance within the overall concept, its area, 
its relationship to conservation areas of neighborin 
communities; 

(2) Quality and accessibility of land for public use, und 
Conservation Commission criteria for public use in- 
cluding trail easements; 

(3) Productivity of land for farm and forestry products; 

(4) Visual aspects: open space adjacent to public ways 
and public areas, part of the green belt pattern; an< 

(5) Wetlands and watershed as storage areas and protectic 
for public water supplies. 

As part of the plan, owners of land of conservation interesl 
will be informed of the Town's interest in their land and the many 
means of achieving mutually agreeable objectives. Essential ingra 
ents for meeting the objectives of the Open Space Plan are a future 



77 






northern alignment for Route 2 and a recycling of the present road 
into a two-lane town road with adjacent trails and bicycle paths. 
The Commission actively participated in continuing efforts with oth- 
er Town boards to achieve State and Federal level concurrence with 
a northern alignment. In addition, preliminary plans were devel- 
oped for recycling, largely through the voluntary efforts of Kenneth 
Bassett, for which we are indeed grateful. 

Significant events included the gift of 7 acres near Sandy 
Pond by the Dr. Paul Norton family, the gift of 5.7 acres by Mrs. 
Olga Pertzoff, also along Sandy Pond, along with the gift of con- 
servation restrictions to an additional 12.6 acres. We also want 
to make note of the gift to the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust of 
11.1 acres of magnificent hemlock grove along Sandy Pond by Mr. Tal- 
cott Banks and the gift of conservation restrictions on 10 acres by 
Mr. Gordon Osborne, also to the Land Trust. We are indeed grateful 
for these gifts, all of which relate to land designated by the Com- 
mission as being of conservation interest. We are also grateful to 
the Old Concord Road Tree Association for their gift of a fine beech 
tree to replace the specimen elm that so long graced the Mt. Misery 
field below St. Anne's Church. 

Our conservation naturalist, Russell Barnes, and his assist- 
ant, were busy building and maintaining trails, planting trees at the 
Well Site, repairing stone walls, monitoring soil conditions, con- 
verting selected cuttings into cordwood and delivering it to resident 
customers, and generally conducting our day-to-day land management 
program. 

As expected, our management activities generated close to 
$6,000 in land rentals, the sale of firewood, and trail work done for 
the Lincoln Land Conservation Trust. It is our hope that our agency 
account arrangement will be continued on a year-to-year basis, as it 
gives us the flexibility needed to apply our resources to necessary 
self-defraying projects. 

We made progress in our long-term efforts to develop effect- 
ive land management and policing procedures that are consistent with 
the rural and natural settings the Town has so well saved for poster- 
ity. Most significant was our activity in the following three areas 

1. In response to the concern of citizens we have in- 
stituted a careful process to control the removal 
of mature trees. 

2. After considering the merits of helicopter applica- 
tion of pesticides by our commercial farmers, we 

78 



have established a procedure for monitoring dosages 
and applications and for pre-notification of affected 
beekeepers. We intend to consider further the whole 
matter of herbicides, pesticides, and chemical ferti- 
lizers. 

3. An unexpected challenge for effective policing was in- 
duced by the Commonwealth's restoration program at 
Walden Pond. The resulting overflow of swimmers 
found its way to Sandy Pond and the lower pond at Mt. 
Misery, both unsuitable for swimming. Traffic haz- 
ards were caused by the resultant illegal parking. 
Working with the Board of Selectmen and the Police De 
partment, we have developed ways of enforcing swimmiii! 
and parking restrictions, and are confident we can pr; 
vent similar violations in the future. 

We accepted with deep regret the resignation of Florence 
Caras who served the Commission well for over six years. 

In closing, we want to express our gratitude for the contin- 
uing strong support of all at the Town Hall, Town Barn, and Fire and 
Police Station — especially Warren F. Flint, Roberta Page, Richard 
Carroll and Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr., without whose services and co- 
operation we could not function. We want to extend our particular 
public gratitude to Gretchen Eckhardt who has devoted countless days 
under the direction of Quincy Adams in the preparation of our Open 
Space Plan map. 






79 



LINCOLN LAND CONSERVATION TRUST 

Trustees : 

Roger M. Barzun 

Bradford Cannon 

William A. King 

Ruth Wales 

John F. Loud, Treasurer 

Carol H. Meyer, Secretary 

William M. Preston, Chairman 



During the past year, the Trust received a gift of about 11 
acres of back land, off Bedford Road, from Talcott M. Banks. This 
beautiful property is adjacent to land previously given to the Trust 
by the late Ann Monks Banks; it includes the rest of the fine hemlock 
grove and a large patch of the locally uncommon round^leaved hepat- 
ica. 

The Trust received from Gordon Osborne a conservation restric- 
tion on 11 acres off Page Farm Road. Primarily this is an agreement 
in perpetuity prohibiting building on the land, which must be re- 
tained "predominantly in its natural conditions". However, agri- 
cultural use and limited harvesting of forest products are permitted. 

Dr. Alphonse L. Gallitano donated a trail easement to the Trust 
along part of the southern boundary of his property. Thanks also 
to Massachusetts Audubon, this has made possible a trail for hikers 
and riders connecting Old Sudbury Road and Long Meadow Road. 

The Annual Meeting of the Land Trust and its affiliated organi- 
zation, the Rural Land Foundation, was held on May 13th at the 
Pierce House. Carol H. Meyer was elected Trustee of the Land Trust, 
and Howard Stevenson, James DeNormandie and Stuart Avery were elected 
Trustees of the Rural Land Foundation. 



80 



Treasurer's Report 



On hand January 1, 1975: 








Savings account balance 


$12,606.57 






Checking account balance 


1,070.69 










$13,677. 


26 


Receipts: 








Contributions 


3,097.39 






Sales of trail maps 


316.00 






Sales of trail guides and studies 


61.30 






Interest on savings account 


652.00 










4,126 


.69 






$17,803 


.95 


Expenditures: 








Trail upkeep; labor § materials 


$ 1,117.47 






Insurance: Liability 


97.00 






Workmen's Compensation 


126.00 






Social Security taxes 


31.35 






Printing, postage, etc., for 








annual meeting 


440.05 






Printing new Beaver Pond trail 








guides 


301.88 






Preparation Silver Hill trail 








guides 


220.70 






New trail map in process 


72.10 






Filing fees 


30.70 






Legal 


7.00 







2,444.25 



On hand December 31, 1975: 
Savings account balance 
Checking account balance 



$13,258.57 
2,101.13 



$15,359.70 



81 



TREE WARDEN 

Russell L. Barnes 



The Warden submits the following report of activities during 
the period from March 31, 1975, through January, 1976. 

This past year over one hundred and fifty dead and dying trees 
have been marked for removal. One hundred of these were elms, 
twenty-five were sugar maples, and assorted hardwoods comprise the 
remaining twenty-five. 

Dutch Elm disease continues to be the most serious shade tree 
problem as it has been for the last forty years. The center of 
Lincoln has been particularly hard hit the last few years. 

Maple decline has taken a heavy toll among the sugar maples, 
especially along Concord and Baker Bridge Roads. Deteriorating 
growing conditions appear to have been the cause for decline. In 
other words, sugar maples located close to roads seem to fare the 
worst. The outlook for maples along Baker Bridge Road is grim. 
Replanting of this road should be the immediate concern of the 
Town . 

It has not been all axes and saws this past year. Some plant- 
ing has been undertaken and the Tree Warden wishes to thank the 
Lincoln Garden Club, Joe Brine, the Old Concord Road Tree Associa- 
tion, Library Trustees, and the Pierce House fund for the donation 
of new trees to the Town. However, more trees need to be planted 
each year to make up for our present and future losses. 

Last fall the Selectmen approved the planting of fifteen trees 
along the newly completed section of the Lincoln Road bicycle path. 
This planting will be completed in the spring. 

The character of Lincoln is in its walls, field and trees — 
their preservation and cultivation will enable the Town to remain 
a pleasant and enjoyable place in which to live. The adoption of 
a comprehensive tree planting and maintenance program is strongly 
recommended. 



82 



PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

Richard P. Carroll, Superintendent 

Road Maintenance 

The Public Works Department completed the reconstruction of 
860 feet of Bedford Road, from the Reservoir to the Banks -Snel ling 
property line. Also, 1,000 feet of Bedford Lane was re-shaped 
and penetrated. 

General Maintenance 



The general maintenance on the Town streets was accomplished 
as needed. The department responded to many work orders and ass- 
isted other departments, as requested. Six catch basins and ap- 
proximately 470 feet of drainage were installed on Bedford Road 
between the Library and Town Hall. Six catch basins were in- 
stalled in various locations in the Town. 

Parks 



As in the past, the custom mowing of the schools and play- 
grounds was continued. All preparations for the April 19th and 
July 4th celebrations were complied with. The ballfield and soc- 
cer field were prepared for the school and Town leagues. One shed 
was moved and cement slab installed at the tennis court. The pro- 
grammed spray for Dutch Elm, poison ivy and tent caterpillars was 
again undertaken. 

Equipment 

All Public Works, Public Safety and Conservation equipment was 
maintained or repaired as needed. 

Snow and Ice 

All streets, bike paths, parking areas and Town properties were 
plowed and sanded as needed. 

Sanitary Land Fill 

The operation of the sanitary land fill has continued with the 
same private contractor. 



83 



Route 117-Codman Road Bicycle Path 

5,500 feet of bicycle path was completed along Route 117 (South) 
Great Road) and Codman Road. We are still trying to negotiate a 
crossing at the railroad tracks on Route 117. 

Lincoln Road Bike Path 



2,060 feet of bike path was completed on Lincoln Road. 

Bedford Road Bicycle Path 

Approximately 700 feet of path was reconstructed in connection 
with the Bedford Road reconstruction. 

Ballfield Road 



Approximately 1,000 feet of Ballfield Road was graded and sur- 
faced. 

Chapter 90 Construction 

Approximately 1,800 feet of road was reconstructed under Chapter 
90 construction. This will be the last contract under this pro- 
gram. The Commonwealth has discontinued the Chapter 90 program. 



In the conclusion of this report, I would like to thank all for 
their cooperation in the execution of our tasks. 



84 



WATER COMMISSIONERS 

Stuart B. Avery 

Frederick M. Tingley, Clerk 

Alan McClennen, Chairman 



Mr. Thomas Norton found it necessary to leave Lincoln and re- 
signed as a Commissioner. Considering the difficulties that later 
arose, we feel that Mr. Norton was well advised. In August, Mr. 
Tingley was appointed to fill the unexpired term. 

During the winter and spring an exceedingly large growth, or 
"Bloom", of the algae Peridinium occurred in Sandy Pond and became 
distributed throughout the Town , imparting a highly objectionable 
odor and taste to the water. As soon as the difficulty was identi- 
fied, pumping from Sandy Pond was ceased and the Tower Road well was 
substituted as the water source, but unfortunately this did not occu] 
until after the algae had become distributed throughout the distri- 
bution system. 

For about ten years a polyphosphate material (Metafos) has been 
added to the water for the purpose of providing a thin lining on the 
inside of the mains, thereby reducing corrosion of the remaining old 
unlined iron pipes and controlling the amount of rusty water. This 
chemical, we found, is a vigorous stimulant of algae growth, and the 
Peridinium, which exists well in the dark, thrived in the Town's 
water pipes. The polyphosphate treatment was terminated and the 
entire system was flushed. With no corrosion prevention, yellow 
water reappeared in portions of the Town. A pH control system was 
instituted, and equipment for the injection of Soda Ash into the 
water was installed at the pumping station. The addition of this 
base to the normally acidic water raises the pH to somewhat over 9 
and, we hope, greatly reduces the corrosion of the iron pipes as 
well as copper, solder, etc. found in private services. This process 
may also extend the life of the system's cement lined and cement 
asbestos pipes. Due to many difficulties with the injection equip- 
ment, it was December before this system was operating satisfactorily) 
and even as this is being written, equipment malfunctions appear to 
be reoccurring periodically. 

The pressure reservoir off Bedford Road was also infested with 
the algae. It was completely drained and refilled and a chlorina- 
tion system was installed to control the algae that remained. This 



85 



process also kills bacteria originating at the reservoir from plant 
decay, bird droppings, animals, etc. State and Federal regulatory 
authorities are requiring that all such open storage reservoirs be 
eventually covered, and, although the chlorination is temporarily 
satisfactory, both a cover and a tank are being investigated as per- 
manent solutions. 

All of Sandy Pond was treated with copper sulfate to kill the 
Peridinium, a rather delicate task, for the dosage had to be great 
enough to kill the algae, but not the fish. Upon determining that 
Sandy Pond was free of algae growth, it was reinstated as the prime 
water source and the well was shut down. 

At the March Town Meeting a borrowing was approved for the pur- 
pose of replacing or lining much of the old iron pipe. There was 
an understanding that this was provisional upon substantial State or 
Federal funds being found, and as these were not available, the 
planned improvements were deferred. Another improvement was the 
cleaning and lining of the twelve inch main between the pumping sta- 
tion on Sandy Pond Road and the Bedford Road reservoir. Being 
seventy-three years old and never cleaned, this had been reduced to 
a ten inch pipe by deposited rust which substantially increased 
pumping power costs and reduced available water pressure, as well as 
being a prime source of yellow water. A second planned improvement 
was the cleaning of the six inch rusted, unlined main down Weston 
Road. Besides being a source of yellow water, the condition of 
this line caused fire flow problems in the southeast portion of the 
Town. After cleaning, the pH control would prevent further corro- 
sion and dirty water from these sources and the fire flow in Brown's 
Woods would be improved. 

This cleaning took place in early November. Due to Insufficient 
planning and some operational errors, a number of unforseen diffi- 
culties arose, including the complete lack of water for most of one 
morning, for almost half of the Town, clogging fixtures by sand-size 
particles in residences along the path of the cleaning, repeated 
temporary pressure losses for some due to the changed dynamics of 
the system and most important, the spreading of the pulverized rust 
throughout the Town and the resultant yellow water. The entire dis- 
tribution system was flushed, but traces of yellow water remained 
until year end. 

During the cleaning process there were breaks in the Weston Road 
pipe, alarming some Town employees and residents of that area who 
feared further breaks during the winter and loss of service when re- 
pair would be difficult. They persuaded the Commissioners to replace 
the main earlier than planned which was done in early December. A 

86 



lined, eight inch, cement asbestos pipe was installed. 

The department reviewed the plans and supervised the installa- 
tion of water systems at Lincoln Woods, the Shopping Center, Farrar 
Pond Village, the Black Subdivision and assisted numerous smaller 
developments and individuals. 

A plan was being developed at the end of the year for the re- 
placement or improvement of the sub-standard mains and the construc- 
tion of new facilities for increasing water quality. If bonding is 
approved at Town Meeting the undersized, rusting pipes along Baker 
Bridge, Old Concord and Concord Roads, Tower and Pierce Hill Roads, 
Route 2, and Upland Field and parts of Beaver Pond Roads will be re- 
placed. Short sections of main on Trapelo and Old County Roads and 
Cedar Road are also due for replacement. To improve fire flow, sys- 
tem reliability and to include areas not now part of the system, a 
number of short links will be built. In following years, the Bed- 
ford and Sandy Pond Road main will be internally lined, and the Lin- 
coln Road main cleaned and lined. The reservoir will be covered or 
a tank will be constructed at that site. In the more distant future 
a filtration facility might be built at the pumping station and more 
land around Sandy Pond will be acquired. 



STATISTICS FOR 1975 



Gallons pumped during the year: 
Sandy Pond 
Tower Road Well 
Total 



133,660,800 

58,408,900 

192,069,700 





Beginning of Year 


Added 


End of Year 


Miles of main 


39.47 


0. 


62 


40.09 


Hydrants in use 


333 


10 




343 


Gates in use 


419 


25 




444 


Blow offs 


32 


1 




33 


Services in use 


1295 


21 




1316 


Meters in use 


1293 


7 




1300 


Replaced hydrants 








16 


Repaired hydrants 








34 


Repaired meters 








54 


Located § raised gate 


boxes 






26 


Service calls 








2400 


Pressure maintenance 






10- 


-100 p.s.i. 



87 



In summary the construction projects in 1975 were as follows: 
By Town : 



Weston Road 



Private: 



Black Subdivision off 
Page Road 

Lincoln Woods off 
Lincoln Road 

Shopping Center off 
Lincoln Road 



3400 feet 8 inch cement asbestos 
(replacing 6 inch unlined cast 
iron) 



1500 feet 8 inch cement asbestos 

1200 feet 8 inch cement asbestos 

560 feet 6 inch cement asbestos 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONERS 

H. Arnold MacLean 

Vincent N. Merrill 

James DeNormandie, Chairman 

The cemetery gates on Lexington Road have not been replaced due 
to continuing vandalism. This has meant that the cemetery is open 
at all times and has resulted in damage to several newly planted 
trees due to their being deliberately run over. The northerly end 
of the grounds has been graded. This area will be finished, the 
road system simplified and grass seeded in the early spring. The 
Commissioners would like to point out that there has been some un- 
authorized planting that is inconsistent with the overall planning 
and appearance of the grounds. These may need to be removed in some 
cases. All flowers (including artificial) will be removed after a 
suitable period to maintain overall appearance. 

The Commissioners express their appreciation to Mr. Douglas 
Burckett for checking and recording more accurately lots and road 
lines. 

There were eighteen interments and nine additional lots were sold 

88 



CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

Donna Burt 

David Man ion 

Jens Touborg 

Julia Pugh, Chairman 



The role of the Celebration Committee has been that of co- 
ordinating and supporting the efforts of Lincoln's organizations 
and committees in three public holidays. During the past two 
years the Committee has worked closely with the Bicentennial Com- 
mission in planning for celebrations in 1975 and 1976. 

The Bicentennial Commission participated in the planning and 
coordinating of Patriots' Day events which took place over a period 
of eight days. The Minute Men organized the Re-enactment of Paul 
Revere 's Capture, the evening sounding of the alarm, and their march 
to Concord on the morning of the nineteenth. Townspeople had the 
opportunity to share breakfast with the Minute Men at the First 
Parish Church before the march, and then some walked to Concord with 
them. There was an efficient system of school busses which trans- 
ported citizens to and from Concord. On Sunday there was the 
Cemetery Ceremony and reception by the Historical Society at the 
Pierce House. Also Roland Robbins started the tradition of plant- 
ing a tree at Thoreau's cairn site at Walden Pond. 

On Memorial Day the Honor Guard of the American Legion of Lin- 
coln and the Lincoln Fire Department Color Guard led the citizens in 
honoring and placing flags at the Veterans' graves at all three cem- 
eteries. The bronze markers which were purchased by this committee 
and placed at all the graves by the American Legion looked fine. It 
is regrettable that they disappeared soon afterwards. A white dog- 
wood tree was planted at the Lexington Road Cemetery. Dr. E. Don- 
Ian Rooney again served as master of ceremonies, and Tracey Keay 
played taps. Brownies, Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts joined the cler- 
gy and citizens in the procession. 

Independence Day 1975 was a welcome change for Lincoln's resi- 
dents of all ages. Due to the problems of crowds and traffic con- 
trol at recent fireworks demonstrations, the Selectmen recommended 
that fireworks be omitted during this Bicentennial year. On the 
evening of the fourth there were a concert by the Waver ly Post Band, 
a delicious chicken barbeque dinner put on by the members of the 
Grange, and a hot air balloon demonstration, followed by a street 
dance, all located at the school campus. In the morning there was 
the children's bicycle/costume parade and the main parade with parade 

89 



marshal Lee Todd in his top hat. Both parades featured the Bi- 
centennial. Sporting events of the day were planned by the Recrea- 
tion Committee and included the Golden Flipper race and water carni- 
val at the Codman Pool, a bicycle track and road race, tennis mixed 
doubles tournament, Softball and soccer games. Food sales during 
the day and evening provided revenue for many of the Town's organ- 
izations. It is hoped that we may have fireworks in 1976. The 
Bicentennial Commission will be coordinating this celebration. 

The Celebration Committee is grateful for the Selectmen's sup- 
port and participation in the above events. 



90 



LINCOLN 1975 BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

John W. Carman, Chairman 

Saville R. Davis 

Margaret Flint 

Stanley Heck 

Daniel A. Maclnnis, Jr. 

Julia S. Pugh 

Sumner Smith 

Frederick P. Walkey 

Margaret L. Wengren 

Katharine S. White, Vice Chairman 

Margaret M. Martin, ex officio 



This report will follow the format of prior years and comment 
on four principal areas, namely: (1) permanent improvements commemo- 
rating the Bicentennial, (2) activities celebrating the period, (3) 
publications, and (4) budget matters. 

PERMANENT IMPROVEMENTS 



The Historical Room, financed by a Town appropriation of 
$2,500, public subscription of over $18,000, and a Massachusetts Bi- 
centennial matching grant of $3,604, was completed and dedicated in 
an appropriate manner on May 4, 1975. 

The Old Town Hall Exchange received a Massachusetts Bicen- 
tennial Commission matching grant in 1975 for improvements in their 
building. 

ACTIVITIES CELEBRATING THE PERIOD 

The Bemis Trustees are planning a second series of Bicenten- 
nial-oriented lectures to follow on with their 1974-1975 program. 

The Lincoln Historical Society is nearing the completion of 
its research to identify and validate those houses now in Lincoln 
which existed 200 years ago. 

April 19th was approached by all communities with real con- 
cern in the areas of public safety, traffic, fire protection, parking 
and the myriad problems that a very heavy visitor influx can produce. 
The Lincoln police, in cooperation with State police, police in sur- 
rounding communities and the Minute Man National Historical Park set 
up plans capable of coping with potential problems in all areas of 

91 



their responsibility. The number of visitors was markedly lower 
than expected: local residents enjoyed the day, the Concord Parade 
and the President's visit. 

The Lincoln Minute Man Company re-enacted "Sounding the 
Alarm" on the evening of April 18th and, after breakfast early on 
the 19th, marched to Concord accompanied by approximately 300 Lin- 
coln residents of all ages. Bus transportation at a modest charge 
was available to Lincoln families from Smith School to a point near 
Walden Pond. Approximately 1,000 people purchased tickets, used 
the service, and attended the Concord Parade. 

Plans are in process in conjunction with the Celebration 
Committee for a gala 200th July 4th Celebration. The details of 
the program will be publicized as they become more defined. 

Paul Brooks 1 " Trial by Fire" was sent to every Lincoln fami- 
ly. Copies continue to be on sale at the Old Town Hall Exchange. 

The Photographic Contest, announced early in 1975, bore 
fruit in the publication of " Five Roads" in late November. This 
booklet has been sold at a price that will substantially cover 
costs. There is every indication that the entire printing will be 
sold out. Reception of the publication by the Town and inclusion 
of many photographs in the Historical Room collection assures us that 
the objective of providing a picture of today for future generations 
has been attained. 

One further publication is planned for mid-1976, which will 
have photographs of Revolutionary houses still in existence with 
brief comments on their history, together with a review of Lincoln 
Bicentennial activities, a summary of the Bemis Bicentennial lectures, 
and other pertinent items. 

BUDGET MATTERS 



The Lincoln 1975 Bicentennial Study Group projected appro- 
priations of $20,000 for the Bicentennial period in their May 15, 
1972, report to the Board of Selectmen. In four annual appropria- 
tions a total of $19,000 has been provided. Current forecasts in- 
dicate that the Commission can complete its planned programs within 
available funds. 

The Legislature passed an act which allows Bicentennial Com- 
missions to expend funds generated by their activities without the 
need for further appropriation. The following is a close estimate 



92 



of money available which meets the conditions of this legislation: 

1. Proceeds from sale of "Trial by Fire" $ 150.00 

2. April 19th bus tickets 1,065.00 

3. Proceeds from sale of "Five Roads" 2,098.00 

Total $3,313.00 

The Commission has been careful in holding expenditures to 
a level below those forecast in 1972 despite the pressures of rising 
prices. Any utilization of Commission-generated funds will have no 
effect on the tax rate. The availability of these funds, however, 
provides greater flexibility in planning the final July 4th 1976 
Town Celebration. 



LINCOLN HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

J. Quincy Adams 

Curtis Chapin (Resigned) 

Astrid Donaldson 

John Todd 

Ruth Wales, Chairman 



With the specific authorization of the Annual Town Meeting 
of 1975, the Lincoln Historical Commission submitted an application 
to the Massachusetts Historical Commission for inclusion of the Cod- 
man barns in the National Register of Historic Places. The Codman 
Estate, consisting of the house, its outbuildings, and the 16 acres 
owned by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities 
had already been listed in the Register. Because the barns are 
owned by the Town, formal Town Meeting action seemed appropriate be- 
fore the nomination was made. 

The Massachusetts Historical Commission, acting as the State 
Review Board, voted the "Codman Farm" eligible for the National Reg- 
ister of Historic Places in August and so notified the Lincoln His- 
torical Commission. The next step is a review of the nomination 
by the National Park Service. Notification of their determination 
has yet to be received. 

Placing the Codman barns in the National Register of Histor- 
ic Places does not restrict their use in any way and protects the 
total property of 18.9 acres from Federally funded encroachment 
(such as highway improvements); also, properties in the Register are 

93 



eligible to apply for Federal matching funds for preservation. 
Such a grant could be used to restore the small 18th Century barn. 

Updating the inventory of Lincoln's historic structures con- 
tinues. Many owners of old houses have provided additional docu- 
mentation, not available when the first inventory of 1966 was done. 
Some of this material will be of great interest to those doing local 
history research. For example, Sumner Smith allowed the Commis- 
sion to make copies of his collection of papers, which includes 
materials relating to the Weston family and property, as well as to 
the Smiths. Copies of these documents will be available in the 
Library. Betty Little has recorded detailed data on the Mill Site 
to add to the inventory of archaeological and historic sites. 

For future reference, the Commission placed 25 copies of the 
1775 map of Lincoln in the vault at the Library. This map, which 
was researched and created by Betty Little and Kerry Glass, with 
illustrations by Jane Cooper, shows houses, land features, place 
names, and other detail about the Town gleaned from contemporary 
sources. 

In the coming year, the Commission hopes to begin publica- 
tion of a series of short pamphlets detailing the history of signif- 
icant structures and sites in the Town to encourage local research 
and make it available to the general public. 



94 



MINUTE MAN NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK ADVISORY COMMISSION 

The Honorable F. Bradford Morse, Chairman 
Mr. James DeNormandie, Appointee of the Governor 
Mr. Donald E. Nickerson, Lexington Appointee 
Mrs. Lucy M. Richardson, Concord Appointee 
Mrs. Katharine S. White, Lincoln Appointee 
David L. Mo f fit, Park Superintendent 

The Interim Report of the Boston National Historic Sites Com- 
mission to the Congress dated June 16, 1958, pertaining to the Lex- 
ington-Concord Battle Road, recommended the creation of Minute Man 
National Historical Park, and the legislation authorizing such 
action, Public Law 86-321, was passed in the first session of the 
86th Congress and approved by President Dwight D. Eisenhower on 
September 21, 1959. On December 14, 1970, Public Law 91-548 amend- 
ed the act of September 21, 1959, to revise the boundaries of Minute 
Man National Historical Park. 

The Commission met once in 1975 in Concord on October 31. At 
that time, the new representative for Concord, Mrs. Lucy M. Richard- 
son was introduced. Mr. Francis S. Moulton, Jr., had been elected 
Town Moderator and therefore submitted his resignation to the Minute 
Man National Historical Park Advisory Commission effective May, 
1975. 

Discussion at the October, 1975, meeting included the Patriots' 
Day events of April 19, 1975, when President Gerald R. Ford visited 
the area and spoke at the North Bridge. 

The Town of Concord traditionally holds a celebration each 
April 19th. 1975 was no exception and Concord's parade and other 
activities were held as usual despite the approximately 100,000 vis-i 
itors who came to the area. Much controversy existed in regard to 
the issuance of a permit to the Peoples Bicentennial Commission. 
Extra law enforcement personnel were on hand for the event. There 
were sixty National Park Service Rangers and sixty-five United 
States Park Police. Twelve of the Park Police were horse mounted. 
On the whole the event went very well. No serious injuries were 
reported. 

The Lincoln Minute Man Company joined the Concord parade after 
an early morning march to Concord on the 19th accompanied by approx- 
imately 300 Lincoln residents of all ages. Bus transportation at a 

95 



modest charge was available to other Lincoln families from Smith 
School to a point near Walden Pond; buses were not allowed to cross 
Route 2 because of the large numbers of people expected in Concord. 
Approximately 1,000 people purchased bus tickets and walked from 
Walden into Concord to see President Ford and the Concord Parade. 

A dramatic increase of 25 per cent in visitation to the Park 
has been experienced. Total visitation for the year 1975 was 
1,243,562. This figure represents visitors to all park facilities. 
The North Bridge Visitor Center welcomed 343,395 visitors. 

The Park was used as a test area for a couple of Bicentennial 
programs presented by the National Park Service. One was entitled 
"We've Come Back for a Little Look Around" - a dramatic presentation 
which lasted thirty minutes and featured actors who portrayed Benja- 
min Franklin, John Adams, Mark Twain and Abraham Lincoln. "The 
People of '76" was the title of the other program - a Bicentennial 
Living History demonstration giving viewers a look into the daily 
lives of citizens in a small colonial village; this program was 
given in Lincoln next to the old Park headquarters. 

A Bicentennial Lecture Series in cooperation with the Lexington 
Bicentennial Committee was offered and proved to be very popular. 

At the North Bridge, in Concord, brief interpretive talks, wea- 
ther permitting, are scheduled daily April through October and by 
request the remainder of the year. During 1975, many school groups 
took advantage of this service. Living History demonstrations were 
featured by volunteers from the various reactivated Minute and Mili- 
tia companies. Individual talks by volunteers who discussed colo- 
nial life and customs were also popular. 

The Wayside Barn, in Concord, opened as a Visitor Information 
Station. An audiovisual program and exhibits are available. During 
the school year "In Touch With the Past" programs were offered to 
both adults and children. Also an environmental program was avail- 
able for local school children at the Fiske Hill area in Lexington. 

As part of the 1975 summer interpretive program many other acti- 
vities were offered. The Concord Band Concerts during July were 
well attended. Programs on Colonial dress, customs, life-style, et 
cetera, were available. On Sundays, 18th Century town meetings were 
another popular presentation. A Liberty Tree ceremony was held on 
two occasions. 

Orville W. Carroll, historic architect for the National Park 

96 



Service completed architectural investigation and prepared an archi- 
tectural report and twelve sheets of architectural restoration draw- 
ings for the proposed restoration of the Hartwell Tavern to April 19, 

1775. 

In the North Lincoln area six residences were sold and removed, 
three were demolished and two have been sold and should be removed 
in the near future. The old Park headquarters facility on Route 2A 
in Lincoln was demolished. There are twenty-three permanent employ- 
ees in the Park. Four Minute Man employees occupy government quar- 
ters in Lincoln. 

Land Acquisition Officer Daniel J. Farrell, Jr., was transferred 
and Thomas R. Coleman, Chief, Division of Lands, North Atlantic Re- 
gion, National Park Service, is in charge of all land acquisition 
matters. 

There are ten privately owned tracts remaining to be acquired 
within the Park containing 15.15 acres. Seven of these tracts con- 
taining 10.02 acres are in the Town of Lincoln. In addition there 
are 11 tracts in historic districts that will not be acquired and 
12 tracts that are publicly owned by the U. S. Air Force, by Towns, 
and by Utilities. 

The land bought by the Rural Land Foundation (a group of Lincoln 
residents) has been converted into an eight-lot subdivision called 
Orchard Lane. This land has been offered to the Relocation Commit- 
tee (appointed by the Selectmen in 1972, George Kornfeld, chairman) 
for Lincoln residents displaced by the Minute Man National Historical 
Park and the relocation of Route 2. To date, two lots have been 
sold to residents that might be displaced by the relocation of 
Route 2. 

It is hoped that the Battle Road Visitor Center which has been 
under construction on Route 2A in Lexington will open in the Spring 
of 1976. 



97 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC, 

DIRECTORS 

J. Walter Brain 
Louise K. DeBaryshe 
Ann B. Janes 
Robert L. Loud 
Roy M. Raja 
F. John Solman 
R. Langdon Wales 

PRESIDENT 

Margaret B. Marsh 



As a non-profit organization operating in part on town land, 
and more especially as local farmers and gardeners operating out of 
the town-owned Codman Barns, Codman Community Farms is pleased to 
appear in the Town Report and to have this opportunity to thank the 
many people in Lincoln who have contributed to CCF in various ways, 
as well as the Conservation Commission, the Selectmen, the Lincoln 
Land Conservation Trust, the Department of Public Works, the Police 
and Fire Departments, the 4-H, the Old Town Hall Corporation and the 
Lincoln Foundation for their interest and support. 

The third year has been a year of increased learning and growth 
for your farm. The community garden plots increased from 110 to 
170 in 1975, additional planting made for more production, the first 
two crops of hay came off the first field where entire replanting 
was undertaken (Donaldson field), and 90 acres were farmed in all. 

Sales of farm produce rose from $6,700 in 1974 to $16,000 in 
1975. Although your farm has not reached the break-even point yet, 
and probably will not before the fifth year, it is gaining experi- 
ence in the fields and in the market place. This year the sales 
outlets consisted of our own two small stands (retail), several con- 
sumers' cooperatives and six nearby roadside stands (wholesale). 
The farm employed ten young people, mostly from Lincoln on a part 
time basis and disbursed $11,000 in total payroll. 

The growing season wound up with the annual Fair in September, 
with its glowing vegetables and gala combination of horticulture, 
music, crafts, dancing (Scottish and square), and simple games for 
children. 

In February and March a most successful course in gardening 
was given, open to members and non-members. A Garden Tour followed 

98 



in July. An elective was offered in the Brooks School program in 
the fall, and a series of eight evening sessions entitled "Back-yard 
Farming II" was presented in the Concord-Carlisle, Lincoln-Sudbury 
Adult Education program. 

In 1975 our farm machinery assets were increased by $9,000 
(tractor, wheel harrow, 2 roto-tillers) . These additions made it 
possible to do more and to do it more effectively. Several more 
pieces of farm machinery are needed to complete our requirements 
for operational projects, and these will be added as soon as used 
items and funds become available. 

Our pioneering efforts to start and run a community farm have 
not only stimulated interest and curiosity in Lincoln, but else- 
where in New England. We have had visitors from other communities 
and states who came to find out how we got started and what kinds 
of projects we have. Some came to the Sheepdog Trials held at the 
Barns in October - others mainly to see the garden plots. 

Farming and producing locally a significant part of the food 
consumed in the area is an idea whose time has come. New Eng- 
land can produce food for local consumption as it did seventy-five 
years ago. Changing economics plus concern about energy, environ- 
ment and transportation are people's interest in the possibilities 
and potential of agriculture in New England. 

It is a challenging potential, and we will continue our efforts 
along those lines and take on that challenge. 



99 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC 

BALANCE SHEET 
November 30, 1975 and 1974 

ASSETS 



1975 



1974 



Current assets: 
Cash 

Accounts receivable 
Inventory 
Prepaid expenses 

Total current assets 

Property and equipment, at cost 
Structures 

Motor vehicles and wagons 
Farm implements 

Less accumulated depreciation 
Net property and equipment 



$ 2,049 


$ 


4,039 


518 




1,150 


1,598 




1,155 


68 


$ 


-- 


$ 4,233 


6,344 


1,623 




1,323 


8,518 




2,188 


6,145 




3,594 


16,286 




7,105 


2,460 




831 


13,826 




6,274 


$18,059 


$12,618 



LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCE 



Current liabilities: 
Loans payable, Bank 
Accounts payable 
Accrued expenses 

Total current liabilities 

Fund balance: 

Unrestricted funds 



$ 3,000 
78 

275 

$ 3,353 



14,706 
$18,059 



150 



150 



12,468 
$12,618 



100 



CODMAN COMMUNITY FARMS, INC, 



STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN 
UNRESTRICTED FUND BALANCE 

Years Ended November 30, 1975 and 1974 



1975 



1974 



Operating revenues: 
Sales: 
Hay 

Vegetable crops 
Livestock 
Custom work 
Total sales 
Dues 
Fair 
Interest 
Other 
Total Operating revenues 

Operating expenses: 

Labor 

Seed and livestock 

Fertilizer and lime 

Repairs 

Depreciation 

Feed 

Rentals 

Supplies 

Fuel costs 

Insurance, taxes and fees 

Freight and utilities 

Legal and audit 

Bad debts 

Interest 

Office supplies and expense 
Total operating expenses 

Operating loss 

Non-operating revenue - unrestricted gifts 

Excess of revenues over expenses 

Unrestricted funds at beginning of year 

Unrestricted funds at end of year 



$ 6,730 


$ 2,491 


5,421 


2,584 


1,901 


1,258 


2,013 


419 


$16,065 


$ 6,752 


1,565 


2,800 


2,132 


1,330 


183 


302 


190 


660 


$20,135 


$11,844 


$10,880 


$ 6,029 


2,319 


1,724 


3,380 


1,280 


1,871 


1,002 


1,629 


711 


779 


432 


1,358 


-- . 


543 


690 


627 


400 


418 


484 


194 


376 


476 


-- 


105 


— 


166 


-- 


216 


778 


$24,961 


$13,906 


(4,826) 


(2,062) 


$ 7,064 


$ 5,000 


2,238 


2,938 


12,468 


9,530 


$14,706 


$12,468 



101 



Schools, Library and Recreation 



TRUSTEES OF THE LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 



Francis H. Gleason, Chairman 
Thomas B. Adams 
Martha DeNormandie 



Te 


rm Expires 


Life Member 




Life Member 




Life Member 




Elected by Town 


1977 


Selectmen Appointee 


1978 


School Committee 




Appointee 


1976 



Katharine S. Bolt 
R. John Hughes 
Molly K. Turner 



Jane Thomas League of Women Voters Observer 



On May 4th the Lincoln Historical Room was dedicated in a simple 
but standing-room-only ceremony. The establishment of a fireproof 
waterproof vault, display and work room complex for historical docu- 
ments completes the vision of George Grosvenor Tarbell, who not only 
gave the library grounds and building to the town, but stated at the 
dedication in 1884 that this was a proper place where "old records 
which are in danger of being lost and forgotten" be gathered to- 
gether. 

A proper repository for valuable historical documents has long 
been needed in Lincoln and is now accomplished just prior to our 
Bicentennial year. The Bicentennial Commission, Old Town Hall Cor- 
poration and a large number of interested resident contributors have 
made this possible. 

Since Lincoln is a rather unique community the library purpose 
is aimed not only at serving the town with a broad collection of 
wanted books but, in addition, acting as a social and educational 
center for the town. In this vein, regular monthly programs are 
conducted on Thursday mornings, organized by Ellen Cannon and Ethel 
Mackenzie. For the first time a chamber music group program was 
introduced and some 40 persons attended. Undoubtedly, momentum 
was provided at the first meeting by "Sumner Smith Reminisces". 

From October through May the library conducts a series of films 
about twice each month which are shown at the Town Hall. Since many 

102 



are produced in foreign countries, they provide a variety of sub- 
jects and background which have been particularly appealing to an 
enthusiastic audience. 

Special mention should be made of the talk and slides presented 
by Judy Polumbaum covering her trip this past summer to China, where 
she worked in a factory and on a farm. Some 60 to 70 persons atten- 
ded. 

The film series for children on Wednesday afternoons is well 
attended, so much so that Mrs. Kent must put on two showings. Tues- 
day morning story hour for pre-schoolers continues with an excellent 
attendance. Coffee is served to mothers while their children are 
generally mesmerized by the program. 

As part of the Eastern Massachusetts Regional Library system, our 
library patrons can obtain books and films through the system. 
Whereas individuals cannot borrow films, groups of any size may do 
so. The Regional Library system has over 500 films available for 
borrowing. Activity in this area increases each year. Catalogues 
are on hand at our library. 

A few staff changes have transpired during the year. Kathy 
Plukas began working on the desk in October. Linda Collins, full- 
time assistant children's librarian, left for England. This posi- 
tion is being filled by Margaret Sykes, who transferred from the 
adult department, assisted by Carolyn Henebry, both in a part-time 
capacity. Mrs. Sykes taught a six-week course in literary criti- 
cism at Brooks School this year as part of her job. 

The third annual Hallowe'en Party for pre-schoolers was a huge 
success, with a child who came as a box receiving the major acco- 
lades. Once again the children made the decorations for the library 
Christmas tree, which was then decorated by the staff at its Christ- 
mas party. 

The record player with ear phones is proving very popular. The 
pages-in-training program continues for children over ten. The 
Garden Club continues to decorate the library with flower arrange- 
ments and holiday plants. A number of interested volunteers take 
on book mending, filing, and other miscellaneous projects. The 
Trustees feel very gratified by the public interest shown in the 
Library, the assistance of volunteers, and the enthusiasm of the 
staff. 

A loose leaf notebook lies open near the card catalogue for re- 
cording suggestions, complaints, or gratuitous comments. We re- 

103 



ceived many good title suggestions, a few recommendations for light- 
ing and architectural changes, and rabid pleas for more Frank Zappa 
records. Patrons seem to enjoy reviewing suggestions of others. 
It is hoped that this suggestion book provides a means of good com- 
munication between the library and the town which it serves. 



LINCOLN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
STAFF - 1975 



Jean Tenander 
Mary Ann Tricarico 
Helen Kent 
Margaret Sykes 
Carolyn Henebry 
Marjorie Snyder 
Mary Irwin 
Nancy Gregory 
Kathleen Plukas 
Audrey Dedinsky 
Phyllis MacFarland 



Head Librarian 

Assistant Librarian 

Children's Librarian 

Assistant Children's Librarian 

Children's Services 

Cataloguer 

Technical Services 

Circulation 

Circulation 

Typist 

Secretary- Bookkeeper 



Hours Open: Monday, Wednesday and Thursday 9:00 to 8:30 
Tuesday and Friday 9:00 to 6:00 

Saturday 10:00 to 5:00 

Closed legal holidays and Saturdays 
in August. 

STATISTICS 1975 
January 1 -December 31, 1975 



General 



Number of days open 
Fines collected 



290 

$2,054.35 



Acquisitions 
Books 



Inventory, 1974 

Purchases 

Gifts 

Total inventory and acquisitions 

Discarded or lost 



42,146 

2,258 

296 

44,700 
1,380 



Inventory, 1975 



43,320 



104 



Records 

Inventory, 1974 1,881 

Purchases 119 

Gifts 2£ 

Total inventory and acquisitions 2,020 

Discarded or lost 67 

Inventory, 1975 1,953 

Aud io-Visual 

164 

33_ 

197 



Inventory, 
Purchases 


1974 


Inventory, 


1975 


Circulation 




Adult 
Juvenile 





Total 1975 Circulation 78,679 



105 



DeCORDOVA AND DANA MUSEUM AND PARK 

Janet Daniels, President 

Chester d'Autremont, Vice President § Clerk- 
Walter J. Salmon, Treasurer 
Francis S. Andrews 
Gregory Kolligian 
Robert B. Newman 
John Pike 



PRESIDENT'S REPORT 

After reading the Annual Report 1975 as published in the January 
1976 Newsletter, I feel 1 need not fill you with too many facts about 
what we did in our 25th Anniversary Year. Let me instead interpolate 
some of the facts into general statements. 

For the second year in a row we have not only had a balanced 
budget but we have also had an operating gain. The Development 
Office has helped accomplish this by enlarging our Corporate Member- 
ship and maintaining numerically our Family Membership while encour- 
aging increased membership donation within that number. 

The School initiated a Docent Program which will more than pay 
for itself with its association with people of all ages over the 
coming years. The summer program was enlarged to include adults 
and the total number of students for the year reached about 3500. 

Our two big special events enabled the Museum to close out the 
year in the black. The Folk Arts Festival made the largest amount, 
but our Birthday Ball, not designed to make money, did make several 
thousands, due to careful attention to budget and the selling of ads 
in the Anniversary Booklet. 

The amphitheater acquired a new shell this year thanks to a 
matching grant from the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission. A 
grant from the Codman Trust enabled us to put on two series of summer 
concerts. 

Our exhibition program mounted five shows this year. We had 
several indoor concert series. We had at least two morning lectures 
on each exhibition, and continued with our new program of evening 
lectures. The various towns, each, had special functions also. And 
to wind up our Anniversary Year, we held our second Phonathon to raise 

106 



money for the Anniversay Fund. 

All in all, it was a spectacular year, and my thanks go, not 
only to the Museum Staff, who always show their dedication and diver- 
sity, but also to the scores of volunteers who enable us to carry on 
our program, whether it's sitting on a committee, stuffing envelopes, 
cooking hotdogs, making phone calls or hanging streamers. You all 
deserve credit in this, our Anniversary Year. 



EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR'S REPORT 

Frederick P. Walkey 

The DeCordova Museum marked its 25th anniversary in 1975 with a 
birthday party - The Crystal Ball , a special exhibition - Candid 
Painting , and a commemorative booklet - DeCordova Retrospective . 
In its entirety, the 1975 program typified the diversity and liveli- 
ness that have characterized Museum programming over the past 25 years 
Exhibitions like Motif New England focussed on the regional scene; 
while others, like The British Are Coming , were of international im- 
portance. Exhibitions embraced a mix of art forms and styles; there 
were some new and some long-established talents, some avant-garde and 
some traditional work, and some firsts for DeCordova - the first muse- 
um exhibition by New England women and the first museum exhibition of 
contemporary quilts. 

Perhaps the most ambitious project of the year was the Folk Arts 
Festival , a great communal celebration of early American folk arts 
and folkways, which drew an attendance of almost 10,000 over a two- 
day period in June and produced enough revenue to offset the operat- 
ing deficit for 1975. 

Last spring a handsome new stage and acoustical shell were con- 
structed in the amphitheater, making it possible to present twenty- 
two outdoor concerts during the summer; the summer concerts were 
devoted to music and dance by folk and clasical ensembles. A series 
of indoor concerts, presented in the main gallery during the fall, 
spring and winter months, included performances by string quartets, 
baroque ensembles, a horn trio, instrumental duos and an "a cappella" 
chorus . 

In 1975, the DeCordova School instituted a new Docent Program 
which holds the promise of substantially extending the Museum's out- 
reach to schools and civic organizations. The School's traditional 
summer arts program, based last year on early American and Shaker 

107 



folk arts, was expanded to include workshops for adults as well as 
young people. In addition to basic classes in art and craft, the 
1975 School cirriculum listed such intriguing titles as Hatha Yoga , 
Print Collecting , From Fleece to Cloth , Matting 5 Framing , Camera 
Communication , Cartooning , Build Your Own Home and Children's Dis - 
covery Workshop . 

The 1975 statistics represent one measure of the Museum's accom- 
plishment over the past 25 years. Total attendance at exhibitions 
and events for the year was 54,400. Total enrollment in adult and 
children's classes in the three terms of 1975 was almost 3,500. At 
the end of the year the Museum had 85 Corporate Members and 3,300 
Family Members. The total operating income in 1975 was $630,000; 
eighty percent of this was "earned income" (as opposed to trust in- 
come) - a remarkably high percentage by museum standards. 

As in all previous years, the achievements of 1975 were due in 
large part to the skills, the labors and the generosity of many ded- 
icated volunteers. The Museum is much indebted to its Board of 
Directors, President's Council, Associate Council, Docents, Phona- 
thon Teams, Crystal Ball Committee, Folk Arts Festival Committee, 
Commemorative Booklet Committee, volunteer staff and all other mem- 
bers and friends who contributed to the program in 1975. 

Special acknowledgement is due Floriy Campobasso who retired 
from the Museum staff in June after serving since 1948 as Caretaker 
of the buildings and grounds. Mr. Campobasso worked at the Museum 
longer than anyone else ever has, and he will be missed by his many 
friends within the Museum membership and staff. 

We thank the Massachusetts Bicentennial Commission for the match- 
ing grant that enabled the Museum to build a new stage for the out- 
door amphitheater. We thank the trustees under the will of Dorothy 
S. F. M. Codman for the grant that funded the summer classical con- 
certs for the third year in a row. And, finally, we thank the 
National Endowment for the Arts and the Massachusetts Council on the 
Arts and Humanities for grants supporting exhibitions and educational 
programs throughout the year. 



108 



DECORDOVA MUSEUM FINANCIAL REPORT, 1975 
(with comparable figures for 1974) 

OPERATING INCOME 1974 1975 



Trusts 


$132,904 


Memberships 


105,075 


Contributions $ Grants 


57,615 


Admissions, Exhibits § Events 


46,155 


Special Events (Ball § Festival) 


-0- 


School $ Art Supply Store 


226,430 


All other income 


10,037 



$130,438 
124,198 
64,517 
42,246 
46,088 
249,863 
11,878 

Total Operating Income $578,216 $669,228 

OPERATING EXPENSE 

Administration $ Development $123,929 $165,050 
Program (Exhibits, Events, 

Collection, Library) 106,563 94,342 

School $ Art Supply Store 188,733 216,114 

Special Events (Ball $ Festival) -0- 31,001 

Printing $ Publications 57,941 59,135 

Buildings § Grounds 58,249 65,383 
Major Equipment, Construction 

$ Repair 18,600 25,656 

Total Operating Expense $554,015 $656,681 

Operating Gain for Year $ 24,201 $ 12,547 

AMPHITHEATER INCOME £ EXPENSE IN 1975 



Total Income for Amphitheater $ 28,549 

Contributions $ Grants $27,500 

Allocated from General Funds 1,049 

Total Expense, Amphitheater $ 28,549 

CASH BALANCE, December 31, 1975 

General Funds $13,475 

Payroll Reserve Fund 15,000 

*25th Anniversary Fund 21,000 

Total Cash Funds $49,475 

* This figure does not include either uncollected pledges to the 
25th Anniversary Fund or contributions to the Fund which were 
designated for the Amphitheater 



109 



DeCORDOVA MUSEUM BOARD OF DIRECTORS 
December 31, 1975 

Janet Daniels, Present 

Chester d'Autremont, Vice President and Clerk 

Walter J. Salmon, Treasurer 

Francis Andrews 

Gregory Kolligian 

Robert B. Newman 

John Pike 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM PRESIDENT'S COUNCIL 
December 31, 1975 

Rob Allen Kenneth J. Germeshausen 

Larry Boyden Elliott Grabill 

John Cant 1 in Robert Kavanaugh 

Ephron Cantlin, Jr. Gregory Kolligian 

John Carter John McHugh 

Thomas Diab Howard McMahon 

Alexander Dusek Paul Schratter 

Ewan Fletcher Stephen Stone 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM STAFF 
December 31, 1975 

Frederick P. Walkey, Executive Director 

Miriam Jagger, Assistant Director 

Joan Kennedy, Administrative Assistant 

Martha DeFrancesco, Bookkeeper 

Joan Anderson, Receptionist 

Diane Osmond, Curatorial Secretary 

Ann Russell, Development Director 

Susana Lannik, Corporate Representative 

Toni Cantlin, Membership Secretary 

Sharon O'Connor, Membership Clerk 

Steve Sakowich, Designer 

James Douglass, Photographer 

Ken Baker, Printer 

Frank Balduf, Custodian 

Ted Marston, Assistant Custodian 

Mark Allen, Park Supervisor 

Ben Outten, Groundskeeper 

DeCORDOVA MUSEUM SCHOOL STAFF 
December 31, 1975 

Merrie Blocker, Director Pat Jensen, Librarian-Secretary 
Deborah Duncan, Registrar John Anderberg, Custodian 
Louise Taylor, School Manager 

110 



RECREATION COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Algeo 

Enid Beal 

Virginia Niles 

Roberta Spreadbury 

Lee Todd 

Harry Had ley, Chairman 



Progress continues toward our goals. To clarify them we can 
note: 

a) We regard as our primary goal the greater enjoyment of 
life by Lincoln residents of all ages, using facilities, 
land, and ideas as available. 

b) We are working toward a gradual modification of activities 
and programs to reflect the changing demographic character- 
istics of the town. 

c) We are trying to lend greater support to activities and 
programs offered by other organizations in town, recogniz- 
ing the important part they play in an overall recreation 
program, and then plan activities to round out the program. 

d) We are putting a greater emphasis on activities and program 
rather than functions. 

The Recreation Committee serves as a coordinating committee -- 
actual activities are conducted by independent organizations, or by 
subcommittees of the Recreation Committee. Both this coordinating 
and funding activity, and the offering of functions to fill gaps in 
them, requires that actual programs be run by volunteers. It is 
extremely difficult to list all the people who have contributed time 
and effort. Many represent other organizations and some none at 
all. We salute you! Without you there would be no recreation 
in Lincoln. Those of you who haven't joined us - please do. We 
need you, and it is fun! 



Ill 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

J. William Adams 
Priscilla Damon 
Lynn Donaldson 
Muriel Weckstein 
Robert Frank, Chairman 



The School Committee's primary concern in 1975 was a continued 
effort, previously begun, to improve and strengthen the instruction- 
al program. Dan Cheever has most capably carried out this mandate 
and his efforts are discussed in his Superintendent's Report which 
follows. We would also like to report to you on several other 
areas of our responsibilities which have been matters of high prior- 
ity. 

A School Committee team labored with the Lincoln Teachers Assoc- 
iation and professional negotiators for virtually a full year to 
develop the first formal collective bargaining contract between the 
School Committee and the L. T. A. It was only after a negotiating 
session involving a State appointed fact finder, lasting until 2:00 
a.m., that the final deadlock was broken. The contract, covering 
working conditions as well as wages, will be in effect for two 
years and is, we feel, fair and equitable to both the town and the 
teachers. It is a tribute to the relationship that exists between 
the staff and the School Committee that, even during periods of 
marked differences in our negotiating positions, there was a complete 
lack of rancor and bitterness. We were able to respect our differ- 
ences and settle them amicably. The Lincoln School System is, and 
will continue to be, a small, sensitive, and humane bureaucracy 
blessed with a devoted, professional staff. 

The School Committee, as it attempts to become a more effective 
policy group, has devoted a great deal of attention to process. We 
have endeavored to develop procedures that can be sensitive to the 
town's concerns and at the same time be formal and legitimate. We 
have tried to encourage citizen participation through our use of task 
forces in some specific areas while, at the same time, exercising our 
expected role of leadership in others. The school's budgeting pro- 
cess has been revised to include extensive mailings, neighborhood 
meetings, and ample opportunity for citizen input before the budget 
is submitted to Town Meeting. Proposed changes in the METCO program 
were subjected to public and professional scrutiny and debate for 
many months so that the Town was in a position to reach an informed 

112 



decision on the Committee's final proposal. Citizens, staff, and 
administrators are participating in a task force studying alter- 
nate uses for excess school space expected to become available as 
our student population diminishes. 

Planning for Lincoln's future is a matter of highest priority 
for the School Committee. An immense amount of effort has gone 
into developing ten year enrollment forecasts, five year budget 
projections, educational program analyses for the next five years, 
and future space requirements. A separate task force struggled 
with long range educational planning while another group worked 
with the Regional School Committee on their study to develop alter- 
nate means of providing education. We sense a greater need for 
coordinated planning with all the other town boards. Decisions, 
plans and forecasts proposed by one board can have major implica- 
tions for all the others. Lincoln needs the opportunity to con- 
sider most carefully the full effect of such plans on its priori- 
ties for the future. 



SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 
Daniel S. Cheever, Jr. 



During the past year, members of the professional staff con- 
tinued to focus on two major priorities: the improvement of our 
curriculum from Kindergarten through Eighth Grade, and the inte- 
gration of students with special needs into the regular classrooms 
whenever possible. To its great credit, the staff has made sig- 
nificant progress in both areas. 

Curriculum development activity during the past year witnessed 
continuation of the new Language Arts program developed a year ago 
and the introduction of an improved Mathematics program developed 
last summer. The Language Arts program, based upon the phonetic 
approach used in Lincoln for many years but incorporating newer 
elements designed by Professor James Moffit, has taken hold and is 
now well established in the classroom. Teachers representing each 
school on both Lincoln and Hanscom campuses serve on the Language 
Arts Curriculum Committee, and meet regularly to continue develop- 
ment activity. In addition, regular in-service training workshops 
are held for all teachers to help implement the program. In Math- 
ematics, a new Curriculum Committee was formed last spring and has 
produced the first draft of an improved sequential program in this 



113 



I subject area. The Mathematics Cirriculum Committee is continuing to 
work regularly throughout the present school year, and has also con- 
ducted in-service workshops for all teachers. Betty Bjork of Hart- 
i well-Smith serves as Co-Chairperson of both these Committees, with 
; Mary Considine for Language Arts and Kathy Steensma for Mathematics, 
both from the Hanscom campus. 

The integration of special needs students into the regular 
, classroom continues to proceed smoothly under the impetus of Chapter 

766, the State's comprehensive special education law. In an inde- 
i pendent, state-wide evaluation of all school systems, the Coalition 
for Special Education and Massachusetts Advocacy Center recently 
awarded the Lincoln Public Schools the highest possible ranking for 
its implementation of special education programs under Chapter 766. 
Though pleased with this independent expression of confidence in our 
program, nonetheless we recognize that many problems remain before 
we can provide adequate services to all students. Classroom teach- 
ers, in particular, do not receive sufficient support to meet the 
challenge posed by an increasingly wide range of students in their 
classroom. 

1975 also saw creation of a second class at Hartwell -Smith under 
sponsorship of the Concord Area Special Education collaborative (CASE) 
This new class for special needs students with serious handicaps 
serves two Lincoln children, two Hanscom children and one from May- 
nard. It is funded cooperatively by the sixteen school districts 
participating in CASE, and is open to any handicapped child in the 
CASE region. Through its participation in CASE, Lincoln has greatly 
expanded the program alternatives available to our special needs 
students at minimal cost to the Town. In human terms, children in 
these classes have made wonderful progress. It is gratifying to see 
the dramatic difference which a good educational program can make in 
the life of a special needs child. 

While the relative success of our special education efforts is 
rewarding, it does not disguise a growing problem. With serious 
fiscal crises at the state and federal level, local communities are 
required to pay more for all types of services including public edu- 
cation. At the same time, state and federal influence over local 
policy is growing stronger, as illustrated by Chapter 766. As a 
result, local communities are required to increase their local bud- 
gets for services over which they have a smaller degree of control. 
This trend, and our continuing concern for long-range planning, 
prompted us in October to renew our suggestion for more coordinated 
planning among all Town boards. In addition to coordinated plan- 
ning, we also urged that these plans be carefully analyzed in terms 



114 



of the Town's likely financial position in five or ten years. Such 
analysis -- of the likely tax base and tax rate, the range of house- 
hold incomes, and so forth -- is essential so that all residents can 
evaluate long-range plans in terms of the Town's ability to pay for 
municipal services in future years. We hope that this coordinated 
planning and financial analysis turns out to be a major Town activity 
in 1976. 

During the past year, the Town focused considerable attention 
on the Metco program through consideration of several proposals. 
These proposals ranged from phasing out our participation in Metco 
to expanding our involvement so that black students from Boston con- 
stitute 30% of our school population. This period of discussion 
over five months -- at every level from School Committee to the teach- 
ing staff to the Town -- was marked by an exceptionally high quality 
of research and public debate. After careful consideration at 
Town Meeting in March, voters endorsed a School Committee proposal 
to expand our participation so that four black children could be en- 
rolled in every elementary classroom through third grade. This pro- 
posal had the effect of increasing black students to approximately 
16% of our total population. 

In October, the Town also received an analysis of projected en- 
rollment trends for the next ten years. To no one's surprise, our 
enrollment is forecast to decline steadily if the present trends con- 
tinue. While these trends will change, nonetheless there seems lit- 
tle question that we will face several more years of decreasing num- 
bers of students, with the corresponding problem of trying to main- 
tain a range of educational programs for students in our schools. 

1975 was marked by several other events. Lynn Donaldson was 
re-elected to the School Committee, continuing a long-standing pro- 
fessional and personal involvement with the Schools. Priscilla 
Damon was elected to a new term; having helped us as a volunteer foi 
several years, we welcome her in this new capacity. She replaces 
Jack French, who has stepped down after seven years of dedicated 
leadership. He will be missed by Committee members, parents, ad 
ministrators, and the staff. The School Committee was joined in 
September by one representative and two alternates elected by Hans 
com parents to serve in a non-voting capacity. These three -- 
Carmen Endlich, Jerry Christen, and Kim Smith -- have provided tre 
mendous support and ably serve as spokespersons for the Hanscom com 
munity. Under Bob Frank's sensitive leadership, this School Com 
mittee is an effective policy-making body on behalf of the Town. 

Mr. Jake Jagel was elected to the Presidency of the Lincoln 
Teachers Association. The past year also witnessed the successful 

115 



negotiation of the first collective bargaining contract between the 
School Committee and the Salary Committee of the LTA. The contract, 
covering working conditions as well as wages, will be in effect for 
two years — a blessed relief to those people who were involved in 
negotiating the contract for more hours than they probably care to 
remember. The new agreement serves the interests of both Town and 
LTA, and is characteristic of the professionalism and devotion to 
service which Lincoln teachers have shown throughout the years. 

Finally, several staff members retired or moved on to new em- 
ployment during this year, including Jane Stewart, who has retired 
after many years of energetic and excellent teaching of our youngest 
students. 

All things considered, the Town continues to maintain a superb 
public school system. This accomplishment -- truly remarkable in 
this era -- is due to the willingness of many people to work hard 
on behalf of the public schools, and the willingness of all residents 
to provide the financial support to the schools. While difficulties 
lie ahead, nonetheless I remain optimistic that we can improve the 
quality of public education in Lincoln. 



116 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1975 



Karen M. Agnew 
David Howard Armstrong 
Janet Lynn Armstrong 
Nancy M. Austin 
Richard A. Barros, Jr. 
Julia Louise Basile 
Jennifer Drew Beal 
Lisa Lehner Bibring 
Carol T. Blanchard 
Emily Hale Bobbitt 
Michelle Marie Boyer 
Lee Ann Brennan 
Rosalind C. Buchan 
Wendy Anne Burton 
Diane Louise Calkins 
Donna Lucille Calkins 
David Campobasso 
Duke Chiotelis 
Pamela Curtis Clark 
Tammis Ellen Coffin 
Nathaniel Cohen 
Robert C. Copeland, Jr. 
Laura S. DeFord 
Michael Joseph Derderian 
Laurel Diane Dickey 
Willard I. Dickie 
Gary Francis Dixon 
Paul Francis Domenichella 
Timothy James Dorian 
Thomas Ansin Ehrenfeld 
William Dustin Elder 
Pamela Greenway Elias 
William Raymond Elliott 
Timothy T. Faddoul 
Sarah Louise Ferguson 
Brenda Lee Fields 
David Ford, III 
Mark L. Foster 
Tracey Eileen Frazier 
Michael G. Fusillo 
John J. Gajewski 
Carolyn McKerrow Glass 



Elizabeth Jean Marie Greaves 

Amanda Currier Gross 

Peter R. Grover 

Rena Marie Gurski 

Hannah Ross Harris 

Linda K. Haytayan 

Bennet L. Heart 

Wendy Hoben 

Jonathan Daniel Hoch 

Richard Manson Holland 

John Samuel Hunter 

Doina Iliescu 

Ronda Frances Jackson 

Andrew Jagel 

Hannah Matilda Keevil 

Jody Knoop 

Georgia Koumantzelis 

Ellen Lankhorst 

Dana Louis Leonard 

Margaret Ruth Linnell 

Thomas Dunham Conant Little 

Thomas J. Malloy 

Eliza Smith Mason 

Dana D. Messina 

Erik Paul Mintz 

Sally Ann Mix 

John Neil Morrissey 

Melissa J. Morse 

Sean Woodman Mullaney 

Joan Cecilia Mclninch 

Darren Lorenzo McNair 

Susan Reid Neiley 

Karen Sue Nelms 

Andreas Nicolaides 

Jonathan L. Niles 

Anna C. Oldfield 

Arthur H. Patterson 

John Caleb Payne 

Susan Peterson 

Robert W. Phinney, Jr. 

Peter K. Piona 

Carol Lynn Pod sen 



117 



Nadine Lynn Rando 
6uy Austin Rasco 
Kelly Anne Redmond 
Russell B. D. Rose 
Frederic Thorp Ross 
Betsy Jill Rudnick 
Elizabeth Marie Russes 
Stephanie Sarah Salmon 
Philip Saunders 
Brian Cyril Scheff 
Dana Lynn Sheer 
Alexandra Jean Smith 
John Beebe Smith 
Philip Rodman Snelling 
Peter Spock 
Susan Elizabeth Sugar 
Lisa Mary Terrell 
Michael Stafford Tingey 
Jennifer Jean Tucker 
Eliza Dillingham Ward 
Alice Collier Waugh 
Diana Weggeman 
Gregory Scot Welch 
Rhonda Anne Williams 
Katherine Hobbs Withey 
Cynthia Wood 



118 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



School 



ENROLLMENT 
as of October 1, 1975 



Grade 



Boys 



Girls 



Total 



Total Lincoln 



Total per 
School 



HARTWELL- 
















SMITH 


Kdg. 


38*( 7)** 


36 


( 7) 


74 


(14) 






Sp. CI. 


3 


3 




6 








1 


39 ( 6) 


29 


( 7) 


68 


(13) 






2 


30 ( 6) 


42 


( 7) 


72 


(13) 






3 


52 ( 7) 


51 


( 7) 


103 


(14) 






4 


33 ( 6) 


37 


( 5) 


70 


(11) 






5 


45 ( 2) 


42 


( 7) 


87 


( 9) 








240 (34) 


240 


(40) 


480 


(74) 


480** 


BROOKS 


6 


49 ( 4) 


48 


( 5) 


97 


( 9) 






7 


46 ( 9) 


66 


(14) 


112 


(23) 






8 


41 (10) 


57 


( 7) 


98 


(17) 








136 (23) 


171 


(26) 


307 


(49) 


307 



787 



( ) Metco 



HANSCOM 
PRIMARY 



HANSCOM 
MIDDLE 



Kdg. 


33 


39 






72 


1 


37 


52 






89 


2 


30 


40 






70 


3 


45 


38 






83 




145 


169 






314 


4 


43 


43 






86 


5 


44 


44 






88 


6 


47 


42 






89 


7 


54 


36 






90 


8 


40 


38 






78 




228 


203 






43T 








Total 


Han scorn 






GRAND TOTAL 


FOR 


ALL 


SCHOOLS 



314 



431 
745 

1,532 



** 10 Kindergarten students expected to enroll in January for 
total of 490 in K-5. 



119 



LINCOLN PUBLIC SCHOOLS 



Administrative Staff 



Daniel S. Cheever, Jr. 
Virginia Soderling 
John J. Carroll 

Philip J. Reddy 
William M. Thompson 
William S. Warren, Jr 

Meredith Jones 
Ronald A. Hadge 

Donald R. Waldera 





Appointed 


Superintendent of Schools 


1973 


Administrative Assistant 


1970 


Supervisor of Buildings 




§ Grounds 


1960 


Director of Pupil Services 


1966 


Metco Coordinator 


1971 


Principal, Hartwell -Smith 




School 


1970 


Principal, Brooks School 


1970 


Principal, Hanscom Middle 




School 


1970 


Principal, Hanscom Primary 




School 


1972 


School Nurses 





Maria Pugatch 
Gladys Crumb, R, 



Lincoln Schools 
Hanscom Schools 



Hours: 



Office of the Superintendent 
8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. 
Monday - Friday 



"NO SCHOOL" SIGNALS 

Local signals will be given on our fire alarm system 
6:30 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 

7:00 a.m. 3-3-3, repeated at 

7:10 a.m. 3-3-3 

Radio announcements will be read between the period of 6:30 a.m. and 
7:30 a.m. Please refrain from tying up local phone lines to school 
officials, fire station and bus operators. 



(WCOP, 



1150K: 



WBZ...1031K; 



WHDH, 



850K) 



Announcements regarding "NO SCHOOL" are made by the Lincoln Superin- 
tendent of Schools for the Lincoln Elementary Schools (Grades K-8) 
only. Announcements for the Regional High School are made by the 
Regional Superintendent of Schools and will be designated "Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional High School". 

120 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



REGIONAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Joan W. Wofford, Chairman 
Richard H. Davison, Vice Chairman 
Cameron H. Eiseman 
David M. Ford 
William T. Maloney 
Henry M. Morgan 

David L. Levington, Superintendent 



This, the nineteenth annual report to the towns of the Lincoln- 
Sudbury Regional School District, records some significant departures: 
departures both from the Committee's previous mode of operations and 
of an individual who has played a major role in the development of 
the school from its inception. It also reports on the state of the 
school and notes issues confronting the school's future. The nine- 
teen year history of Lincoln-Sudbury Regional High School has re- 
corded a relatively continuous increase in the size of the high 
school population. Annual reports from earlier years repeatedly 
stress the Committee's need to wrestle with the management of a rap- 
idly growing institution. This year, we begin for the first time, 
to see a decline in student enrollment, a trend which we expect to 
continue into the future. This turning point in enrollment trends 
prompted the Committee to undertake a long-range educational and 
financial planning project, supported with funds from the National 
Institute of Education. The Committee has also undertaken an exam- 
ination of critical issues currently confronting the high school. 
These twin efforts of planning and assessment have demanded of Com- 
mittee members a commitment of time and energy that has occasionally 
staggered us all, but they have produced a number of valuable re- 
sults: 

the involvement initially of more than 200 citizens in a 
close examination of pressing and controversial issues: 

graduation requirements 

standards and expectations, both academic and behavioral 
structure of the school day: flexible/modular scheduling 
structure of departmental programs and course selection 

procedure 
assessment /evaluation 
discipline, hall kids and vandalism 

121 






a series of reports (currently in process) which can provide 
the Committee with a thorough examination of a range of its 
current practices and which can serve as benchmarks against 
which to measure new directions 

the opportunity for individual School Committee members to 
explore in depth and over time an aspect of the school for 
which normally we each may have less time 

the generation (through the NIE effort) of highly detailed 
data regarding our own school, its costs, students and its 
comparison with other schools 

the efforts over nearly a year of a 30 person Working Com- 
mittee to prepare alternative means of cutting school costs 

the mailing to all citizens in both towns of a brochure 
describing the three alternatives chosen by the Working 
Committee for examination by the towns 

the attendance by approximately 1,000 high school students 
at a presentation of the three alternatives 

the involvement of approximately 800 citizens of both towns 
in the consideration of three alternative directions in 
which the school might move in the next five years 

the completion of 600 detailed questionnaires regarding 
citizen views of the financial and educational future of 
the school 



The citizen task force reports and a final report on the NIE ef- 
fort will be made available to the towns during the Spring of 1976. 
Hopefully, they will help the Committee chart the directions of the 
school with a firmer knowledge both of citizens' views and of the in- 
tricacies of the institution for whose care we are charged. 

The care of that institution, however, will never be as easy or 
sure in the absence of Lily Spooner. Retired in December, 1975, Lily 
takes with her 21 years of service to Lincoln-Sudbury, starting in her 
capacity as Secretary to the original Committee (even before there was 
a school) and proceeding through the three titles she laid down at her 
retirement: Business Manager, Assistant Treasurer, and Secretary to 
the School Committee. 



122 



The fidelity, integrity, total competence and indulgent humor 
with which Lily guided untutored new Committee members into something 
approaching understanding of the budget has been experienced by all 
who have learned from her. Her steel is well known to anyone with 
the temerity to question her numbers. The loss we all feel at her 
departure is enormous. 

Typical of this grand lady's character is her determination that 
any effort to honor her service should come in the form of a scholar- 
ship fund for which we "will all have to work and work hard". As a 
result of Lily's initiative, and to her credit, there now exists the 
Lincoln- Sudbury Scholarship Fund, which seeks to raise $10,000 for 
each of five years through the contributions of the entire school 
community. A committee composed of ex-School Committee members 
Howard Emmons, Ellen Cannon, and Virginia Kirschner and present 
School Committee member, William Maloney, is already at work develop- 
ing the plan for this effort. 

The Committee has not only lost, but gained this year. Two 
new members of the Committee were elected in March to fill the seats 
vacated by Martha Clough and Roger Flather. They are Cameron Eise- 
man and David Ford, both of Sudbury. We miss Martha and Roger but 
welcome our two new members. 

With respect to other aspects of the state of the school, there 
are the following events and changes to report: 

- LSRHS received the Ernie Dal ton Award, signifying that 
its Athletic Program (and performance) ranked it "Number 
One" in Massachusetts among schools our size. 

- The School Committee approved the Intensive Studies Pro- 
gram, an innovation which was developed internally by 
staff and administrators and inaugurated in the fall to 
provide a more structured educational option for those 
students for whom it is appropriate. 

- In light of falling enrollments, the School Committee and 
staff began to confront the issue of staff reductions. 

- The system for evaluating staff was redesigned by a special 
committee which worked for more than a year and which in- 
itiated the new process during the past year. 

- Bob Millett left the Assistant Principalship which he has 
held for the past ten years to return to the classroom. 



123 



We speak not only for the school, but for the many hun- 
dreds of students whose lives have benefited from his 
wise and compassionate leadership, in expressing our 
thanks to Bob for his outstanding service. 

Bradford Sargent assumed many of Bob's old duties in the 
new role of Acting Coordinator of Hall Directors. 

- Anne Mahaney was appointed Business Manager as a replace- 
ment for Lily Spooner. 

- Martha Pappas was appointed Acting Administrative Assist- 
ant to the Superintendent. 

- Frank Heys was appointed Secretary to the School Committee, 
As for the future, three issues stand out for attention: 

- How to help approximately 2,000 students experience a less 
complex and potentially overwhelming institution while pre- 
serving the diversity of approaches and range of options 
which LSRHS now offers 

- How to cope with the continuing demands by the Common- 
wealth for services in the area of Special Education 
(Chapter 766) while not impairing the quality of services 
offered the majority of the student body 

How to manage the process of contraction (as opposed to 
our previous growth) at a time when our staff is increas- 
ingly mature and inflation continuously a problem 

It is with respect to the last issue that the School Committee 
undertook the long-range planning effort (NIE) referred to earlier. 
Our attempts to respond to the other two issues include reconsidera- 
tion of the organizational structure of the high school and continu- 
ing attempts to respond sensitively to the special needs of our 
students within a framework of concern for our entire student popu- 
lation. 



124 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 



ANNUAL REGIONAL DISTRICT ELECTION 



The Regional District Election was held in conjunction with the 
elections in Lincoln and Sudbury on March 31, 1975, and certifica- 
tions of the results were received from George Wells, Town Clerk of 
Lincoln, and Betsey M. Powers, Town Clerk of Sudbury, as follows: 



For three years 
Susan L. Berry 
Cameron H. Eiseman 
David M. Ford 
Reginald L. Maynard 
Blanks/Scattering 



Lincoln 


Sudbury 


Total 


730 


1,034 


1,764 


383 


1,841 


2,224 


411 


2,068 


2,479 


686 


1,082 


1,768 


288 


335 


623 



Frank Heys, Jr. 
District Secretary 



125 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 



GRADUATES - CLASS OF 1975 



Abbott, David B. 
Adamson, Scott 
Adolph, Janis Lynn 
Ahlberg, Christine Martha 
*Ainley, Elizabeth A. 
Anthony, David C. 
Aufieri, Leonard A. 
Azar, Sandra M. 
Azar, Don M. 

Baker, Ellen-Marie 
Barker, Douglas R. 
Barnet, Pamela Jane 
*Barron, Fredericka Jane 
Basile, Chris 
Bayer, Charles Lee 
Beaudette, Carolyn Jane 
Bell, Karen J. 
Bellows, Leslie C. 
Bender, William R. 
Bennett, Mark V. 
Berckman, Elaine A. 
Bergen, Cindy M. 
Bierig, Brian W. 
Bishop, Susan 
Blackey, Mark E. 
Blanchette, Richard J. 
Bleakney, Katherine Ann 
Bomba, Debra M. 
Boots, Robin Adele 
Bosshard, Deborah M. 
Boucher, Michele L. 
Boyd, Joseph F. 
Bozeman, Beverly S. 
Branche, Lynne C. 
Braun, Alan R. 
Briden, David J. 
Brockington, Susan G. 
Brown, Katharine Terese 
Brown, Mark 
Brown, Sharman C. 
Bump, Jadene L. 



Burgarella, Paul T. 

Burk, Prescott Richardson 

Burke, Margaret E. 

Burt, Wayne F. 

Burton, William deKrafft, Jr 

Burton, Bonnie Elise 

Butcher, Scott W. 

Cain, Dorothy Mae 

Calder, Jeffrey Graham 

Calkins, Patricia A. 

Cali, Lawrence James, Jr. 

Campbell, Tracy Lynn 

Cane, Beth 

Cannon, Gregory J. 

Carley, Malcolm 

Carlson, Kathleen G. 

Carney, David 

Carter, Kenneth R. 

Casner, Christine 

Champeny, Susan 

Chase, Ted 

Chiotelis, Johanna M. 
*Cheatham, Leslie C. 

Chorney, Howard S. 

Cloud, Janet A. 

Clemens, Robert W. 

Cleveland, Claudia E. 

Cohen, Betsy Ruth 

Collins, Brian J. 

Combs, Joan Lucille 

Connolly, Diane C. 

Connors, Barbara Anne 

Cook, Kathleen M. 

Cop el and, Kathy 

Corr, Shawn P. 
*Cosgrove, Robert T. 

Coutts, Deborah Lee 

Cowan, Eric W. 

Crandall, William Stephen 

Crawford, John Douglas 

Crocker, Ruth M. 



126 



Cruikshank, Barbara Leigh 
Cubelli, Jane E. 
Curt in, Brenda Ann 
Cutter, Christopher 

Dandeneau, Jill S. 

Dansro, Renee A. 

D'Antonio, David C. 

Davidson, Michael P. 

Davin, William P. 

Davis, Douglas F. 

Davis, Kelly 

Davis, Robert P. 
*Devlin, Lucy A. 

Dexter, Susan 

Dickey, Rosanne Eileen 

Dickie, Marcella E. 

Diehl, Emily Kay 

DePoala, Diane 

Dixon, Russell J. 

Doherty, Ann T. 

Donahue, Cecile M. 
*Doyon, Dennis F. 

Downing, Michael 

Driscoll, Kevin W. 

Dreher, Lori A. 

Druschel, Linda C. 

Dudley, Jeanne E. 

Duggan, Richard E. 

Durning, Timothy A. 

Dyment, Edward J. 

Edmands, Candi 
Elliott, Timothy 
El sen, Lynne E. 
Evans, Susan L. 

Faddoul, Gregory Peter 
Fagerlund, Christine Alane 
Fales, Lynn A. 
Feldman, Amy L. 
Feldman, Daniel Jay 
Felleman, John P. 
Fennel 1, David F. 
Fernald, Kristin B. 
Fickett, Joel Alden 
Finan, Peter D. 



Fish, Carolyn 

Fisher, Gary R. 

Flaherty, Brian 

Flansburgh, Earl S. 
*Flather, Julie Davis 

Flathers, Mary E. 

Floyd, Rebecca E. 
*Forbes, Gwendolyn 

Foster, Johannah 

Francis, Debra J. 

Fredella, Jennifer A. 

French, Hilary 

Frost, Rainer Lindon 

Fryer, Jeffrey Keefe 

Fuller, Nancy L. 

Fullerton, Nancy J. 

Gale, Nancy E. 
Gallerani, Richard Mark 
Gallo, William P. 
Galloway, Donna 
Gardiner, Thomas S. 
Giannetti, Louis M., Jr 
Gillig, Roy W. 
Giner, Jose 
*Gleason, John McHale 
Glencross, Carl C. 
Goodman, Ilona Sue 
Gorman, Theresa Marie 
Gotschall, Thomas R. 
Graham, Larry L. 
Grahn, Deborah M. 
Greelis, Cynthia J. 
Gregory, Christine 
Gregory, Layne 
Gregson, Deirdre E. 
Greenleaf, Thomas E. 
Griffin, Thomas M. 

Hairston, Cheryl A. 
Hall, Cynthia E. 
Halligan, Lisa J. 
Hankey, Diane 
Hanson, Paul R. 
Harvey, David R., Jr. 
Harvey, R. Dennis 
Hauser, Peter George 



127 



Hawes, Richard R. 
Heinecke, Eric Anson 
Hennessy, Muriel E. 
Henry, Carolyn 
Hewitt, Elizabeth Lincoln 
Hickman, Joseph C. 
Higdon, Kim E. 
Hildreth, Mary V. 
Hill, James M. , III 
Hoar, Bruce Wane 
Hogu, Paul 

Hollander, Michael C. 
Hollis, Joanne M. 
Hotchkiss, Donna Lee 
Howard, Julie 
Howe, Christine 
Huffman, Robert Adra 
Hughes, Pamela M. 
Huie, Bruce J. 
Huneck, Susan L. 
Huse, David A. 

Ingard, Marianne 
Irby, Mark 

Jackson, Gordon Fiske 
*Jacob, Stefanie 
Jennings, Sarah A. 
Johnson, Bethany Baxter 
Johnson, Donna Leslie 
Johnson, Jeffrey M. 
Johnson, Judith E. 
Johnson, Martha E. 
Jones, Catherine 
Jones, Karen L. 
Jones, Peter 

Kano, David Bruce 
Kastler, Pamela L. 
Kelley, Pamela J. 
Kellogg, Edmund D. 
Kennedy, Douglas R. 
*Kerrebrock, Nancy 
Kessel , Audrey 
Keyes, Kenneth Walter 
King, Peter J. 
Kirby, Janet Mary 



Kirk, Kristin E. 
Knapp, Cindy Lee 
Koester, David 
Kojabashian, Lisa A. 
Kooy, David Peter 
Kramer, Peter J. 

Lafler, Steven J. 

Landry, Daniel G. 
*Lang, Steven Eliot 

Larsen, Craig R. 
*Leape, Jonathan I. 

LeCount, Diane Insull 

LeMoine, Jacqueline 

Lenington, Kathryn Anne 

Leppla, David K. 
*Levi, Laura Jane 

Li, Wendy I. 

Lind, Barbara A. 

Little, Lisa R. 
*Lockery, Shawn R. 

Longland, Virginia M. 

Loomis, John D. 

Lynch, Brian E. 

MacDonald, Dianne F. 
MacKinnon, John Scott, Jr 
MacLachlan, Laurie 
Mader, Paula 
Magnier, Nancy A. 
Mahoney, Susan 
Mailly, Peter 
Maiuri, Bruce A. 
Malerbi, Mary 
Mall, Julie A. 
Malone, Mark 
Mangini, Christopher M. 
Mann, Douglas 
Mar, Timothy C. 
Marchessault, Stephen F. 
Maroni, Mark L. 
Marrone, Dale M. 
Marsh, Andrew C. 
Martel, Marianne P. 
Martel, Michael J. 
Martin, Joanne Adair 
Martinelli, Grace L. 
Mason, Eric B. 



128 



Mason, Julie Elisabeth 
Matsudaira, Makoto 
Maynard, Karen Denting 
Maynard, William S. 
McElvery, Richard M., Jr. 
McGarry, Jane 
McGee, Becky J. 
McGovern, Anne 
*McGovern, Patrice 
McGraw, Heather Jean 
McGraw, Thomas James 
McKnight, Deborah J. 
McMeniman, Diane R. 
McNally, Kathleen A. 
McNamara, Richard B. 
McQuiston, Timothy 
Mellish, Richard 
Meyer, Sharon J. 
Miles, Gina 

Mills, Frederic B., Ill 
Milroy, Douglas Lee 
Mitchell, Robert Bradford 
Monahan, Mary E. 
Moore, Cheryl A. 
Moore, Dean 
Morrison, William 
Morrissey, Kathleen M. 
Moulton, Patrick 
Mount, Bruce D. 
Mulholland, Dana Marie 
Munsey, Douglas H. 
Murphy, Benson B. 
Murphy, Joseph J. 
Murphy, Pam 
Murphy, Sally Melinda 
Mussoni, Robert M. 
Myers, Raymond L. 

Neal, David 
Neelon, Peter C. 
Nelson, Kenneth C. 
Nelson, Perry 
Neumeier, Nancy Ellen 
Nicholls, Douglas 
Nilo, Robert E. 
Norling, Bruce D. 
Nunez, John T. 



O'Brien, Cheryl A. 

O'Brien, Robert, Jr. 

O'Connor, Karen Jean 

O'Malley, James Eric 

Orabona, Andrea C. 

O'Shea, Erin 

Ostroff, Theodore 

0' Sullivan, Timothy V. 

Otis, John G. 

Outten, Benjamin Knight 

Pacini, John E. 
Paratore, Charles V. 
Patterson, Edward S. 
Pearlstein, Myrna Beth 
Peirce, Andrew B. 
Perko, Ellen S. 
Pihl, Dean 
Pinto, Mary T. 
Pittman, Robert R. 
Place, Sarah Anne 
Plum, Michael A. 
Pollens, Michael Sol 
Poor, Richard A. 
Porter, Donald E. 
Poulos, Nicholas C. 
Powell, Cheryl A. 
Pratt, Melissa Brooks 

*Quick, Pamela Loraine 

Raeke, Lauren P. 
Rarus, Michael 
Reed, David Neil 
Reed, Kelsie 
Reeves, Susan E. 
Renwick, Mark E. 
Resnick, Andrew M. 
Rhodes, Robin M. 
Ricciardi, Michael 
Risch, Lillian A. 
Robinson, Darlene F. 
Rock, Paula J. 
Rodriguez, Ruth M. 
Rogero, Robert Peter 
Rose, Anne C. 
Rose, Elaine L. 






129 



Rosenheim, Michael 

Ross, Donald A. 
*Ross, F. Douglas 

Ross, Janet A. 

Roth, David 
*Rothenbuecher, George L, 

Rowlings, Daniel B. 

Rozaki, Myriam 

Rudolph, Cathy L. 

Rugo, Hope Stewart 

Russell, Charmaine A. 

Russell, Lawrence J. 

Russell, Leigh Ellen 

Russell, Lisa H. 

Salmon, Joan 

Samuels, Peter J. 

Sargeant, Keith M. 

Sargent, Jane H. 

Sauta, Gina M. 

Saxe, Deborah F. 

Scheerer, Stephen R. 

Schlichter, Barbara A. 

Scholbe, Brett 

Scholten, Debra Anne 

Seaman, Sue A. 
*Sears, Elaine D. 

Seeckts, Linda 

Senders, Warren 

Shansky, Alan H. 

Sharrow, Jan E. 

Shaw, Karen M. 

Shay, Lorraine A. 

Sheldon, Hilary R. 

Shirley, David B. 
*Sifferlen, Mary Monica 

Signa, Frank Paul 

Simon, Virginie D. 

Skarnes, Richard 
*Skavicus, Anita I. 
*Smart, Michael G. 

Smith, Jacqueline A. 

Smith, Lawrence F. 

Smith, Melissa J. 

Smith, Nathaniel 

Smith, Ruth Sturtevant 

Sottile, Steven M. 

Soule, Bruce Donald 



Stauffer, Karl B. 
Stearns, Barbara A. 
Stearns, E. Marion 
Steffens, Cynthia L. 
Steudel, Karen L. 
Stone, Jennifer 
Stone, Robert E., Ill 
Stowe, Carol June 
Striker, Louisa May 
Sullivan, Brian 
Summers, Timothy 
Sykes, John 
Sykes, Timothy David 

Terwiske, Mary 
Thurmond, Leslie Ann 
Tichnor, Stephen 
Tighe, Brian A. 
Tingey, C. Regan 
Tober, Edwin D. 
Tobey, Richard E. 
Tobey, Julie Ann 
Topham, William John 
Trailer, Jill 
Tucker, Jess W. 
Turcotte, Jonathan D. 
Turner, Richard P. 
Turner, Robert M. 

Urgotis, Joanne Marcella 

Vanaria, Karen A. 
Vannerson, Stuart Harris 
Velie, Margaret M. 

Wachtler, Robert L. 
Wahl, Jeffrey Bundy 
Waldman, David 
Walker, Heidi 
Walker, Michael A., Jr. 
Wallis, Gregory Tad 
Walsh, Brian 
''Ward, Benjamin A. 
Weisblatt, Paul L. 
Wentworth, Elizabeth Ann 
Wentworth, Nathan Robert 
Wesselborg, Christopher N, 
Wheeler, Daniel H. 



130 



Whelpley, Richard Frothingham, Jr, 

Whiting, Peter E. 

Wilkins, Katherine Marie 

Wilson, Dana E. 

Wilson, Pamela J. 

Winchell, Frederick C. 

Wollmar, Douglas Spencer 

Yalen, William J. 
Yore, George P. 

Zarrilli, Joseph 
Zaumseil, Robert W. , Jr. 
Zondiros, Diane S. 



* Cum Laude 



131 



1972 


1973 


1974 


1975 


429 


387 


373 


340 


1475 


1516 


1513 


1487 


41 


42 


64 


78 


9 


14 


14 


14 



DISTRIBUTION OF PUPILS ATTENDING REGIONAL HIGH SCHOOL 
October 1, 1975 



Lincoln 
Sudbury 

METCO (Tuition) 
Other tuition 

Total 1954 1959 1964 1919 

Boys 981 990 970 926 

Girls 975 969 994 993 

Total 1954 1959 1964 1919 

9th Grade 
10th Grade 
11th Grade 
12th Grade 
Post Graduate 
Total 



Tuition Pupils Attending 

Other Schools 11 13 21 33 



526 


515 


476 


470 


517 


512 


501 


480 


429 


495 


497 


476 


478 


437 


489 


491 


4 




1 


2 



132 



LO 


C 


o> to 


O 


00 o 


fs 


CU 


o rfr 


o 


LO CT> 


C7> 


O 








i— 1 


P 

CU 




© 


M 


lp 


D- 








o 










10 










en 










03 


• 


to to 


o 


I s - x* 




o 


o> to 







IS 









to 


C 


h- 






r~- 


CU 


o 






O 


O 


•-H 








p 


q; 








cu 


1— 






<P 


a. 


co 






O 














o 




C 


W 
en 




_J 


o 


o 


«J 


• 


o 


C3 


•H 


t-t 


o 


o 




P 


u 


z 


3: 


co 


rt 






<_> 


LU 


o 






CO 


1— 


3 






_l 


ZD 


m 




+-) 


<c 


Q 




CN 


c 


z: 


<c 


X 


I s - 


CU 


o 


a; 


P 


O 


U 


1— 1 


O 


03 


1— I 


p 


cu 




-o 




CU 


LU 


q; 


C 


<P 


d. 


q: 


Z5 
O 


o 
o 


O 




>- 




CU 


in 




or 


LU 


CO 


en 




—> 


cm 


1 


rt 


• 


CO 


LU 


P 




o 


Q 


:n 


en 


U 


z 


3) 


3 


o 






CO 




a. 






z 










_ 1 
o 








p 


o 






f -1 


c 



• 


LO O) 


to 


\o to 


I s - 


° 


Tf CN 








z 


CN 









O O 0> LO CM LO 

CN-^ 



-«- O ft 



vo o t-- \o Lo i— i 



ex 



i— i in 4-> 

.-I CD CD 

O bo P 

O CD O 

.-I 0) 

W)r-t in 
C O 



•h o m 



P O 

in o in 

o x f-t 

3< o O 

*--. w o 

X X 

u <u o 

o p en 



p 
C P 
aj O 

P -H 

bO C 

3 



P t3 



O 

cu o 
c x 

•h o a ^ w 

en in cu oo (-i 
3 P 3 



N en 

•H i— I 

-l o 
nj O 
•H X 
O O 
cu in 

a 

CO 



Tf LO 




H 






H 


p, 1 


CN 


o 


X 


CNI CN 




o 






to 


O 


oo 


c 


p 






















CT> 




,— 1 






■>* 




LO 


o 


cp 
















CN 


o 


o 

en 

cu 
X 


vO ft 




^r 






I s - 


>* 


CN 


LO 


6 


r- 














2 


to 


cu 

e • 

in 

c cu 
o o 

•H 
T3 P 
(U O 


i— < •— < 




CTi 




LO 


1— 1 




I s - 


o 


en rt 


(N cr> 




r«» 




vO 


I s - 




CN 


o 


rt ^ 


• • 




• 




• 


• 




• 


• 


x a 


vO 




tt 




to 


LO 






o 


















to 


o 

1—1 


en bo 
cu c 
bO'H 
rt P 

P !h 

C O 


rH Tt 








\£5 


LO 




I s - 


00 


CU (X 


I s - 




CN 




H 


CN 




2 


to 


o cu 

^ c, 
cu 

CL, CU 

•3 

» >H 

cn 5 


LO O 




O 










LO 


o 


P. cu 


00 LO 




LO 










00 


o 


rt p 


• • 




• 










• 


• 


cu al 


LO 




r— 1 










I s - 


o 


X P 


CN 














CN 


o 


en 
en 

§p= 

•H -rl 
> * 


tO CN 




vO 












v£J 


cu 


o 














i-H 


CT> 


P E 


















to 


a. p 
o 

.^cp 
en C 
CU O 
P O 
cU 


-l vO 


oc 


o 










LO 


o 


3 O 


a> <-t 


LO 


00 










^J- 


o 


X! P 


• • 


• 


■ 












• 


rt 


LO ft 




,— i 










o» 


o 


P "3 


CM 














CN 


o 


bO CU 
bO 

c c 

O rt 

X 
-3 O 


00 -<3- 


CN 


t*. 










H 


to 


CU 


00 






1 

C 

H 

o 
u 

e 

•H 

o 
p 


i— 1 

C 

o 

•H 

CU 

as 


tn 

B 

o 

•H 
P 

cd 
o 




2 


Tj- 
to 


in 3 
aJ cu 
X cu 
X 
cu 
P en 

CTJ CO 

X 
en 

cu en 
bO-P 
a) en 
P a) 
C X 

CU 

o bO 

P C 

<U -H 

P.P 








150 X 








P 


"3 X 






c 


^ 










^ o 


p 






•H 


3 -a 








I s - CL, 


X rt 




, — i 


c 


X 


CU 






a3 


a» cu 


O P 


-a 


CU 


M 


13 


X 


h 




«J 


ft ct 


|-H -H 


CD 


> 


3 


3 


cd 


cu 




o 


* 


CL.--I 


> 


a) 


p 


CO 


i-H 


X 




H 




E 2* 


o 


P 


cu 







+j 









ojsshb: 



133 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Treasurer's Report 
July 1, 1974 - June 30, 1975 



Total cash balance, July 1, 1974 



72,784.78 



District Fund 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 

Receipts: 

Lincoln assessment 
Sudbury assessment 
State reimbursement - 

building construction 

transportation 
Investments 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield £ Group 

Life Insurance 
Disability insurance #2 
Tax sheltered annuities 
Building construction #5 
Miscellaneous income 
Adjustment 



Disbursements: 
Operating budget 
Debt service - interest 

- principal 
Investments 

Building construction #4 
Building construction #5 
Outlay 

Community service 
Blue Cross-Blue Shield § Group 

Life Insurance 
Disability insurance #2 
Tax sheltered annuities 
Adjustments 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



$ 719,253.63 
2,894,463.53 

332,498.37 

252,731.85 

6,125,000.00 

22,815.08 

888.62 

25,687.48 

150,000.00 

242,217.00 

.01 



3,582,381.59 

143,706.25 

475,000.00 

6,200,000.00 

107,256.13 

189,391.09 

50,983.35 

1,264.08 

21,931.19 

822.60 

24,754.48 

9.38 



(2,002.01) 



10,765,557.57 
10,763,555.56 



10,797,500.14 
(33,944.~58~) 



Federal Reimbursement P L 874 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



34,740.00 

9,018.00 

43,758.00 

.00 

43,758.00 



134 



Chapter 506 Metco 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 $ 6,505.40 

Receipts 122,318.00 

128,823.40 
Disbursements 121,788.48 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 7,034.92 

Project Space - Metco 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 .00 

Receipts 29,918.21 

29,918.21 
Disbursements 28,530.71 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 1,587.50 

Title II 1974 Library 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 2,625.00 

Receipts .00 

2,625.00 
Disbursements 2,610.01 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 14.99 

Title II Man Made World 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 5,000.00 

Receipts .00 

5,000.00 
Disbursements 5,000.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 .00 

Title III On the Air 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 .00 

Receipts 1,300.70 

Adjustment .01 

1,300.71 

Disbursements 1,300.71 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 :_00 

E. N. E. R. G. Y. 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 2,858.99 

Receipts 1,530.00 

4,388.99 
Disbursements 4,388.97 
Adjustment «02 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 .00 



135 



P L 90-318 Nursery School Grant 1973 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



1,650.67 
.00 



1,650.67 
1,630.33 



20.34 



P L 92-318 Nursery School - Work Study Project 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



.00 
8,000.00 



8,000.00 
8,000.00 



.00 



Nursery School - Tuition 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



10,689.12 
14,217.63 
24,906.75 



11,381.90 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 



Disbursements 



Towel Fund 



N.I.E.-G-74-0033 School Committee Grant 



1,381.99 
548.46 



1,930.45 
1,930.45 



00 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



.00 

40,711.00 

40,711.00 

38,664.75 

2,046.25 



Cafeteria Fund 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 
Receipts 

Disbursements 
Cash balance, June 30, 1975 



12,275.73 
166,4 65.99 
178,741.72 
160,941.02 

17,800.70 



136 



Athletic Fund 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 $ 1.19 

Receipts 5,534.17 

5,535.36 

Disbursements 4,301.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 1,234.36 

Adult Education 



Cash balance, July 1, 1974 1,211.72 

Receipts 18,096.65 

19,308.37 
Disbursements 17,040.90 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 2,267.47 

Bicentennial Grant 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 .00 

Receipts 990.00 

990.00 
Disbursements 990.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 .00 

Gallevani Fund 

Cash balance, July-1, 1974 .00 

Receipts 100.00 

100.00 
Disbursements 100.00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 .00 

Music Scholarship Fund 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 342.82 

Receipt-s 18.64 

361.46 
Disbursements .00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 361.46 

Howard Emmons Fund 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 171.41 

Receipts 9.31 

180.72 
Disbursements .00 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 180.72 



137 



Cannon- Kir shner Fund 

Cash balance, July 1, 1974 $ 332.75 

Receipts 16.68 

349.43 
Disbursements 349.43 

Cash balance, June 30, 1975 ._00 

Total cash balance, June 30, 1975 $ 53,544.03 



George B. Flint, Treasurer 






138 



LINCOLN-SUDBURY REGIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

BALANCE SHEET 
June 30, 1975 

Assets 

The First National Bank of Boston $ 50,675.00 

Newton-Waltham Bank $ Trust Co. 2,326.85 

Waltham Savings Bank 542.18 
Certificates of Deposit - First 

National Bank 475,000.00 

Loans Authorized 25,000.00 

Total Assets $ 553,544.03 



Liabilities § Reserves 

Building Construction #4 44,009.00 

Building Construction #5 4,416.91 

Commonwealth of Mass. - Transportation 33,818.16 

Federal Reimb. P L 874 43,758.00 

Metco 7,034.92 

Project Space 1,387.50 

Title II Library 14.99 

Nursery School - Grant 20.34 

- Tuition 11,381.90 

School Committee Grant 2,046.25 

Cafeteria 17,800.70 

Athletic 1,234.36 

Adult Education 2,267.47 

Music Scholarship 361.46 

Howard Emmons Fund 180.72 

Surplus Revenue 353,018.00 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life Ins. 2,961.67 

Disability Insurance #2 121.68 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 2,710.00 

Loans Authorized & Unissued 25,000.00 



Outstanding Debt 

2.4% School Bonds payable $50,000 Nov. 1, 1975 50,000.00 
3.7% School Bonds payable $50,000 May 1, 1976- 

1980 250,000.00 

3.1% School Bonds payable $100,000 Feb. 1, 

1976-1985 1,000,000.00 

4.0% School Bonds payable $25,000, Aug. 1, 

1975-1983, $ $20,000 Aug. 1, 1984-86 285,000.00 
4 1/4% School Bonds payable $220,000 Aug. 1, 

1975-1982 1,760,000.00 

6.5% School Bonds payable $15,000 Aug. 1, 

1975-1984 150,000.00 



139 



$ 553,544.05 



$3,495,000.00 



WHERE TO GET INFORMATION ABOUT THE HIGH SCHOOL 



The School Committee, Administrators and Faculty all are com- 
mitted to providing the citizens of Sudbury and Lincoln with as much 
information as possible about the Regional High School. Major 
sources of information include: 

Area Newspapers : School news appears regularly in the Sudbury 
Town Crier , the Concord Journal - Lincoln Edition , South Middlesex 
News , and Town Talk . Other papers from time to time publish inform- 
ation about the Regional High School. 

Regional Newsletter : Distributed to every home by mail twenty 
times each year. 

Student Handbook : Distributed to every freshman in September, 
and when new editions are published every student receives a copy; 
available to all at the School Office. 

Program of Studies : Distributed free to each student when 
issued; additional copies available to all at the School Office 
($1.00). 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE MEETINGS : Held the second and fourth Tuesday 
of each month, and open to the public. Meetings are held in the 
Regional High School Library at 8:00 p.m. except every fifth meeting 
which is held at the Brooks School in Lincoln at 8:00 p.m. 

STUDENT NEWSPAPER : The Promethean is published by the students 
during the school year and sold at the Regional High School. 

SCHOOL OFFICES : Open five days a week all year, from 8:00 a.m. 
to 4:00 p.m. Telephone 443-9961 or 259-9527 for any inquiries. 



140 



NO SCHOOL SIGNAL 



In the event of severe weather (storms or sub-zero tempera- 
tures) or when the transportation system is disrupted, WBZ/WBZ-TV, 
WKOX, WCVB-TV, WEEI, WHDH, WVBF, WCOP, WGTR, WRKO, and -WSRO will 
broadcast the no-school announcements for the high school between 
6:30 a.m. and 8:00 a.m. The audible alarm (horn) at the Town 
Hall is for the elementary and junior high schools only. The 
Regional High School closings will be announced only by the above 
radio and/or TV stations. 

We believe these announcements are clear, and therefore urge 
parents to refrain from calling the homes of school personnel. 
Parents should not call the Fire Department or Police Department. 



141 



STUDENT EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 
Vickie Kerrebrock, Chairman 



In 1975, the Student Exchange Committee awarded partial schol- 
arships to four LSRHS student ambassadors, who spent the summer 
between their junior and senior years travelling abroad. Three 
students travelled under the auspices of the Experiment in Inter- 
national Living: Rosanne Friel who went to France, Jennie Stephens 
who went to Greece, and Robert Glaser who went to Luxembourg. Our 
fourth ambassador, Maggie Wood, participated in a work program in 
Haiti under the auspices of Operation Crossroads. 

Scholarships extended by the Cheadle Hulme School, England, and 
administered by the Student Exchange Committee, were awarded for 
1974-75 to students Josh Adelson and Jim Seaman, who returned this 
past summer after spending their entire junior year studying there. 
Two other LSRHS students received Cheadle Hulme scholarships for 
1975-76 and are currently at Cheadle Hulme School. Linda Calan- 
drella is in her junior year there, while Chris Fagerlund is there 
for a post-graduate year of study. 

Mr. Louis Williams received the Teacher Ambassador Scholarship 
which is jointly sponsored by the LSRHS School Committee, the LSRHS 
Teachers Association and the Student Exchange Committee. Mr. 
Williams travelled to Ghana, where he spent the summer gathering in- 
formation for a course in African Literature which he plans to teach, 

Four foreign exchange students completed their 1974-75 academic 
year at the high school this June and returned to their homelands. 
They are: Elsebeth Christiansen and Alex Rose, both from Denmark, 
Myriam Rozaki from Greece, and Makoto Matsudaira from Japan. 

Four other foreign exchange students sponsored by the S. E. C. 

have been studying this academic year, 1975-76, at the high school, 
while living with families in Lincoln or Sudbury. They are: Annina 

Iranto from Finland, Valencia Krakue from Liberia, and Fatou Sidibeh 
and Modou Senghore, both from the Gambia. 



142 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

STUDENT EXCHANGE COMMITTEE 
1974-1975 



Cash on hand, 9/11/74 



$4,629.12 



Income: 



Square dance 

Cook book 

Springthing 

International Dinner 

Appeal 

Talk - Betty Busiek 

Dessert concert 

Bank interest (savings) 






$ 63.05 

7.50 

4,367.35 

277.37 

656.01 

35.00 

165.69 

223.79 


$5,795, 


.76 


Expenses: 

Ambassador Program* 
Foreign Students* 
Arts Council disbursement 
Bank service charge 


:s 




$1,934.00 

1,027.38 

545.00 

13.50 


$3,519, 


.88 


Net Income 


$2,275. 


.88 


Committed Funds: 












Arts Council 
Select Chorus 






$1,000.00 
$1,000.00 






Cash on hand 9/8/75 








$6,897. 


.08 


Breakdown of Exp 


>enses 


; for 


Ambassadors and 






Fore 


;ign Students 




*AMBASSADOR PROGRAM 












1 Teacher Ambassador 

2 Ambassador Scholarships @ 
2 Ambassador Scholarships @ 


$300. 
$500. 


00 
,00 


$ 334.00 

600.00 

1,000.00 

$1,934.00 







143 



* FQREIGN STUDENTS 

Insurance $ 240.00 

School expenses 36.36 

Postage 104.17 

Washington trip 522.92 

Other trips 71.60 

Christmas 15.45 
Miscellaneous (courses and ads for 

M. Rozaka) 37.88 

$1,027.38 



144 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

Charles E. Courtright Acton 

Rico A. Merluzzo, Vice Chairman Arlington 

Henry L. Hall, Jr. Belmont 

John J. Shimkus Boxborough 

Kenneth L. Bilodeau Carlisle 

Lydia A. Smith Concord 

Richard F. Zeoli Lexington 

Ruth W. Wales, Secretary Lincoln 

George G. Cormier Stow 

Alfred C. Cron, Chairman Sudbury 

Frederick L. Heinrick Wayland 

Albert V. B. Kelsey Weston 

1975 was highlighted by the opening of the new facility for 
the Minuteman Regional Vocational Technical School in January and 
the appointment of a Superintendent-Director in December. 

Ronald J. Fitzgerald, the new Superintendent-Director, has re- 
cently served as Executive Officer and Director of Research for the 
Massachusetts Advisory Council on Education (MACE). His previous 
experience includes ten years as Superintendent of the Amherst-Pel- 
ham Regional School District. Dr. Fitzgerald's selection is the 
result of an eight month search which began when former Superinten- 
dent-Director Samuel H. Sains resigned. The process included con- 
sultation with the thirteen superintendents in the District on meth- 
ods and criteria for selecting a qualified, capable administrator, 
screening of over 100 applicants, interviews of seven finalists by 
constituent groups (superintendents, administrative staff, faculty, 
parents, students), and final in-depth interviews of the three top 
candidates by the full School Committee. 

Faculty and students moved into the new building in January; 
complete occupancy of the facility was marked by a Dedication and 
Open House on June 14 attended by citizens of the District, which 
includes the towns of Acton, Arlington, Belmont, Boxborough, Carlisle, 
Concord, Lexington, Lincoln, Stow, Sudbury, Wayland and Weston. 

The school and program are planned to provide students with 
marketable occupational skills and the foundation for further educa- 
tion when appropriate. Each year the program expands to the next 
level as the freshman class of 1974-75 moves through the four years 
toward graduation. School opened on September 2, 1975, with both 
9th and 10th grade students enrolled. 



145 



At the present time, 9th grade students spend half of each day 
in academic areas and the other half in occupational areas. The 
academic half includes Communication Arts, Human Relations, Math, 
Science and Physical Education; the occupational half allows students 
to experience eight different vocational areas on an exploratory 
basis for five weeks each. 

This year, 10th grade students follow a "week about" schedule. 
One week is spent in academic studies, full time; the next week is 
spent full time in one of four occupational areas. Each period 
lasts ten weeks. 

Next school year (1976-77), an 11th grade will be added and 
each student will concentrate on one major vocational program. 
With the inclusion of cooperative work opportunities in local busi- 
nesses and industries in 1977-78, the four-year program will be com- 
plete. 

During the coming months, in addition to the regular program, 
Minuteman will be offering three other programs: Time-Sharing, 
Occupational Competency, and Adult Education. 

Time-Sharing began in December; this program requires close 
cooperation of District schools in adjusting student schedules so 
that 8th, 9th and 10th grade students can spend half a day in ex- 
ploratory programs at Minuteman, half a day in their regular academ- 
ic programs in their home schools. 

The Occupational Competency Program, which is funded by a Fed- 
eral grant of $57,000, offers 9th through 12th grade students in the 
District a two-afternoon a week opportunity to explore eighteen 
career areas as a way of increasing their awareness of vocational 
possibilities. 

Adult Education, scheduled to open early in 1976, will provide 
evening courses which make use of many of Minuteman' s special facili- 
ties and equipment. 

Whenever practicable, Minuteman programs provide actual work 
experiences for students. Currently, Culinary Arts students are 
operating the Fife and Drum restaurant, a dining room located in the 
Mall of the school and open to the public from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. 
each week day. Distributive Education students staff the two stores, 
also located in the Mall and open to the public. During the sum- 
mer of 1975, thirteen students were paid to work in a public cafe- 
teria program serving 300 to 500 persons daily, including many Bi- 

146 



centennial visitors from other parts of the country and overseas. 
Intended as a break-even operation, the summer cafeteria actually 
netted $400. 

In April, 1975, Alfred C. Cron of Sudbury was elected chairman 
of the committee, succeeding Henry L. Hall, Jr. of Belmont, who had 
served six years as chairman of the School Committee and its pre- 
cedent Planning Committee. Rico A. Merluzzo of Arlington was 
elected Vice-Chairman, and Ruth W. Wales of Lincoln continues as 
Secretary. 

Other committee changes include the resignations of William F. 
Fitzgerald of Lexington and George B. Banfield of Boxborough. Mr. 
Fitzgerald was instrumental in securing several scholarships to be 
awarded to graduating seniors. He is replaced by Richard F. Zeoli 
of Lexington. John J. Shimkus is the new member from Boxborough. 

Also during the past year, a Parents Organization was formed 
and has been active in supporting the school in various ways. 

1975 was an eventful year for the Minuteman Regional Vocational 
Technical School, requiring considerable extra effort on the part of 
all those involved. The School Committee deeply appreciates the 
work of all who are endeavoring to develop the outstanding education- 
al facility envisioned when the District was formed. 



147 



O \0 
CN O 
CN LO 


\oior--ooooootooo 
<— it^h-ooLoot^Looooo 

OOHOOOOMO^J^OnO 


to O O LO o o 
a> o o r-i o o 
o lo cn cn o o 


lO i— 1 to 

.— 1 LO CN 

o> o <-> 


v£> O 
h- o 

r-< o 


tO LO 

r-1 tO 


l-l CJ> r-l rH 


"3" i— I \o to O CN 

VO rH VO r-1 r-l 
LO CN 

1— 1 


(N 00O 
O r-1 \C 

to to 


Tj- to 
00 \0 

to 



o o 


O O O 00 o 


o o o o o 


or, 


o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


O O O .-t o 


o o o o o 




o o 


o 


o o 


o o 


o o 


O hO«N 


1 \D LO O tO LO 


LO 


CN O 


1 o 


CN CN 1 


CN O 






1 « • 








•> 1 




\£> t^ 


tO CN i-H LO 


1 LO tO 


cc 


CN 


1 CN 


Tt 1 


to 


1-1 


CN rt 




LO 




1-1 


I— 1 


vD 



o 








oc 




t- 




co 








Q 






>- 


_J 


a: 


o 
o 


P 


nz 


?" 


o 


rs 


to 


CO 


-J 


I— 


<: 


LU 


<_> 


C3 


•— c 


O 



o 


o 


C 


o 


o 


O 


O 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


CN 


LO 


h« 


o 


o 


to 


LT, 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1 — 1 


o 


o 


c 


CN 


CM 


^r 


LO 


LO 


r*. 


** 


o 


O 


c 


o 


o 


LO 


N 


LO 


o 


o 




CN 


cn 


r> 


1— 1 


i— 1 


00 


LO 

CN 


LO 


to 

CN 


cs 


1 — 1 


00 


LO 

cn 


i—l 


rt 


,H 



c 


.-i o 


o 


LO O 


LO 


<tf o 






to 


Tt o 




tO l-l 




CN 





£ 


o 




> 


Q 




z 


—I 


<r 


<c 




z 


CD 


o 


z 






C3 


1— 


LU 


«-t 


a: 


a: 




LU 


2= 


D_ 


< 


o 



■o 




o 


I/] 


+-> 


a> 


CJ 


o 


ri 


•H 


J-l 


> 


+J 


rH 


c 


a; 


o 


CO 


u 





o 


o 


o 


O 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


LO 


a 


O 


O 


o 


00 


00 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


1— I 


,— 1 


o 


O 


C 


o 


CN 


CN 


o 


o 


oc 


o 


1 o 


LO 


c 


O 1 


to 


1 o 


CN 1 1 


CN 


LO 


O 


LO 


^r 


^r 


oo 


00 


CN 


to 


CN 


1 l-l 


LO 


CM 


O 1 


rr 


1 CN 


O 1 1 


CN 


c 


CJ) 


a> 






1-1 


■- 1 




00 


l—l 






CN 


vO 


o 

CN 




vO 
CN 


CN 


CN 


CN 


"* 



O vO 
O vO 
O O 



voior^oo ooto 

vO NMOO N l/) 00 

OLOtOCTiCN I00TJ-O 



LO tO LO LO O 


i cn o r^ 


o to to i-i a> 


*Hd 


i-i r- 





o o 

o o 

O I O I 

tO I O I 



O O LO 
O O CN 
O CT) i-H 











Z 












V) 












DO 

c 










i— i 












CD 












•H 


CD 








a 












•H 












2 


o 








-H 












•M 












O 


4-> r-1 








CJ 












C -H 












H 


4-> O 








CD 








r— 1 




O > 












!h 


•H +-> 








a. 








aJ 




•H CD -H 












£ 


IS 




c 




co 








o 




■M O 4-> 




CD 










O tfl 




W 








•H CD 




rt -H O 




VI o 










o rH 




•H r-1 




•»^j 








bO • o 




•P > < 




c c 




cu 




>, 


U -H 




(/> CTJ 


M 


00 o 






■ 


o > c 




U U 




O rt 




o 




rH 


Q 


rH 


•h ex 


C 


c o 


X 




u 


^H rH CCJ 




O CD -M 


i— i 


•H c 


i—i 


c 




03 


i-H 1 


o3 


&T3 


•H 


• H OQ 


u 






O • rt t3 


4= 


P.CO c 


03 


+-> CD 


03 


03 




rn 


o • 


•M 


X 


X 


a 


• 


• 


X H <-> C 


■!-> 


</) CD 


•M 


rt w 


4-> 


rH 




o 


o +-> 


O 


<U C 


O 


O +J 


i-< 


> 


a. 


o o cd 




C T3 T3 


O 


!h C 


O 


3 


■M 


ex 


X O.H 


Oh-H 


rt 


rt x 


X2 






X • E- +-> 


03 


rt O 3 


H 


CD -H 


H 


W 


c 


e 


O 3 




3 rH 


CO 


CD CD 


■H 






tn-d <-> 


O 


^ OP 




CX aS 




C 


CO 


CO 


00 CO 




CO Q. 


H 


H H 


J 


< 


CO 


D- W < I H tt. CO 




O S 






cc 


H 



148 





. . 


, 




o o 


o 




o o 


o 


1 


O O 1 


o 


1 


■ * 1 




1 


00 O 1 


00 




00 .-t 


CM 







o o 


00 




u 




o o 






<D 


1 


O O 1 


Oi 




X, 


1 


•> « 1 






•M 


1 


00 O 1 


to 




O 




00 .-1 







►— i 


T3 




oc 


w 




\- 


3 




CO 


c 




•— 1 






Q 


c 




-J 


o 




o 


o 




o 






3: 






o 






co 


>- 


"O 




cc 


0) 


—1 


<c 


+J 


<c 


s: 


O 


o 


s: 


rt 


t—t 


ID 


L, 


z 


co 


+- 


:c 




C 


o 


h- 


o 


LU 


LU 


o 


t— 


Q 




_l 


■=> 




«a: 


ca 




z: 






o 


LU 






O 




i— 


Z 




<c 


<c 




o 


■z. 




o 


LU 




> 


1— 




_J 






^ 


i 




o 








Q 




CJ3 


Z 




LU 


ct 




OH 


C3 




z 


Z 




i 


t— i 




LU 


«a: 




1— 


q: 




r> 


LU 




+— 1 


a. 
c 





0) 
0) 






to 




<H 


1 


1 1 1 






P. 


1 


1 1 1 
1 1 1 


vO 




PL 






CM 




£ 






LO 











LO 




to 






Tf 




<D 


1 


1 1 1 


to 




O 


1 


1 1 1 






•H 


1 


1 1 1 


■* 




> 






to 




M 






LD 




u 




CO 











to 






vO 




<D 


1 


1 1 1 


o 




•rH 


1 


1 1 1 


vO 




*H 


1 


1 1 1 






id 






to* 




* — i 






"* 




03 






CM 




CO 











> ^ 
u o 
o 

CO c 

o 



3 -H 
g 3 

6 cr 
o o 
u < 



149 



r-~ \£> CN 

(NMOl 

vo lo vo 



oo co to r~- 

rt C-- 0> LO 

i-H O .-l CM 



m to *o h n a io^o noh^^nw 

LOCNt-^vOOOl^vCr^t^ i— I Mfl ifi O 1/1 N 
W 00 r- 1 N Tf CN 00)^0 LO f-~ rH LO CN O O 



O vC 00 


Oi 


\£3 o 


00 rH to 


CN 


■rj- v£) 


tO \£> tO 


00 


00 



M Ol 00 Ol l/l 

'C ooa> h to 

t/l CM Ol tO (N 



tJ- ^t vO tO 00 
C i-H 00 c to 

O H <t tO^t 



N ^ to to 

Oi o en rH 



00 CM O 


LO 


Oi C^ N 


00 O TJ- 


1^ 


in to o 


CT» rH 


r-^ 


CN LO \C 



i— I 1/5 TJ- CN 



vOrJ-Tti— ltO>Ol/ll/)N\ONO 

oioiinHNNoooooiLTji/itoai 
NtooovONNtomi/iififfiac 

NHl/ll/llfiOlNvCNNHXIN 



1— 


in 


oo 


r^ 


1— 1 


<T> 


o 


•— 


_l 


■ 


o 


o 1 


o 


CO 


rn 




<_> 


LU 


oo 


z 




=> 


_i 


•"3 


<c 




c_> 


1 



z >- 

O —I 



o z 



. 


. 


5-1 


> 


*J 


s- 


c 


a> 





CO 


u 





f~~ vD to 

VO i-H ^t 

O t Tt 



Cfl 

+-> -* 
X o 
CO o 



LO CN 

cn to 
cn to 



CN 00 vO rj- r- 
00 00 CN <3\ 0\ 

O O rH rH 



CJ 


CN 


,_J 


to 


vO 


lo 


o 


cn 


o 


oc 


^r 


,__; 


o 


o 


c 


L0 


,_J 


^ 


vO 


LO 


r- c 


CM 


c 


a 


LO 


r- 


CN 


l-H 


LO 


o 


to 


o 


o 


r-j 


to 


c 


o 


o 


r- 


o 


to 


r^ 


CM 


r- o 


^t 


o 


o 


vO 


r^ 


r^ 


00 


*0 


LO 


o 


o 


oc 


KJ 


oc 


o 


LO 


a 


CM 


LO 


LO 


to 


CJ 


en o 


oc 


o 



CN T3- CN CN vD CN lO 



U • 

O rH 
&. C(J 
0,00 

3 



o **• 

O CN 
O CN 



O CO" 
H CO 

a. 



Own 


o 


vO 


LO O 


en 


OOOrf 


r-l O O 


Ol/lHH\Ol/)N 


00 o 


LO O Tfr 


o 




LO O 


to 


O O CM 


to o o 


o r^ o to r^ cn r-- 


H O 


cn v£> cn 


LO 


00 


VO LO 


o 


O 00 to 


00 O LO 


o cn lo LO to cn en 


vO O 



i-H LO O tO 


o 


CN VO 


o 




CM -rj- 


CNCNvOCMtOi— 10000 


CN \£> 0O 


00 00 


\D i-H CN 


CD 

u 


i-H i-H 






4-* 


HHHHHH^OIO 

cn cn 

■O h^X ft 


tO rH tO 




c - 




• tf> 






• c 


rt < rt O O • 






• • O W 


1 ft 


T3 4-> 


X 




r< <u 


+-> fn U. 1)£ U 


73 T3 

OJ w cu 




g 'H in ti v 


3 


UJ M 


+-> 




+-> E 


U f- O S CO -H 




W O 


< T3 






CU rH 


< -h cn c 


CJ r-l 




O Q -H ftO 


Ch 


CD 


cr, 


• 


. X rH M • 3 


C • • rt 


>^ 


CJ 1 J> -H -H 






S 


X 


I-t +-> 


• bO CX, rt (D£ g X 

E-o ciu J o gp 


cu cn o o 


H 


X M 


cn ^h >-* 


X 


u 


UJ cn 


• H X O-H 


<a • 


• 4-i OJ C Cm 


O o 


• H 3 i-H 




0) 


c 


OrnMcuortOrt 


O JZ <x u 


rH > 


X ftdcHO 


ctf X 


Q < 




H 


l-H 


uoquso-sus 


co a. co cu 


X 


O 3 3 U 


a> 
















co co co a. 


H 












u 


J < 


o o o o 


O 














o o 


o o o o 


o 














o o 


i— 1 CN i— I CM 


to 














LO \0 


i-H i-H CM CN 


CN 














CM CM 



150 






to 


■** 


vOCMi-ICMr-~0.-lCM 


NO 


00 


r-»o>oor^toovocN 


00 


o 


h s m i/ioi^ooi 








o 


LO 


K) O vO Irt N » 1/) 


■«* 


to 


i-H LO i-l O t N 00 



o 


Tt O i-t CM 


r-~ 


,— 1 


^f- 


o 


NHvO (N 


in 


00 


CM 


o 


to <-* vO O 


r— t 


o 


l»» 












,— t 


in oo Ln 


o» 


o 


<0 




0> (N 00 




NO 


O 
KJ 



o> 


o> cm 


** 


O 


00 t^ 


sO 


t-H 


i—i 


a> 



. 


. 


Jh 


> 


■p 


M 


c 


o 


o 


Cfl 


u 





o 


«* 


O CM 


O CT> 


CM 


00 


O 0> 


in to 


i— 1 


o 


un r~- 


cm r- 










to 


in 


o 


vo io 


CM 


to 


in 





LO 

+-> ^ 

X o 
<D O 
H OQ 



CM K)N 

a> i-i oo 

to OtO 





4-> 


V. 


fH . 


a 


O "-h 


£ 


PL, rt 


+-> 


cxw 


c 


3 




CO 



<U r-l 
O C3 

U CO 



to to 
to to 



o o o o 

o o o o 

< < < < 

o o o o 

o o o o 

MSN H 

tO CM CM CM 



o 


o 


c 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


LO 










r- 


o 


o 


vD 


to 


a> 


to 


LO 


r> 


I— 1 


o> 


vr 










-o 


*t 


oo 


CM 


CM 


•— 1 





















V 


. 






1 

5 












1 










o 


4-> O 






o 




T3 




i 




•H 










• »H 


o <n o 






J-H 




o 








bfl 




c3 






E E 


< c c 


o 




^ 




X 


in 


a> 


• 


o 




P! 






o rt 


u 




£ 




•H 


<u 





u 


1 — 1 




c 






o a) 


-M -H C 


c 






tu 


be 


c 




o 




•H 




X 


PhCO 


C +-> CD 


03 










u 


cd 


c_ 


X 


i—i 


4-1 




■p 


tn 


CD eci +J 


u 




• 


bo 5-i 


rt 


-a 


• 


u 


id 


C3 


> 


i—i 


c -o 


TJ f-i C 


3 


■M 


PL, C 


0) 


JZ 


•H 


CO 


X 


o 


O 


h 


Bj 


rt O 


3 CO -H 


CO 


c 


b 


•H 


X 


u 


3 




M 




o 




O 


^ o 


+-> pl, ca 


c 





5 




♦J 




u 




a. 




> 




X 


H U. 


wos 


(-H 


as 


H 




o 




c 




o 




o 




o 


o o 


o o o 


o 


o 


O 




o 


< 


o 




o 




o 




o 


o o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o 




o 


H 


r* 




oo 




c-, 




CM 


to ^j- 


m i-t cm 


CM 


to 


** 




LO 


£ 


CM 




CN 




CM 




to 


to to 


to ^ -3- 


LO 


LO 


LO 




LO 



151 



MINUTEMAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

ASSESSMENT FOR PERIOD 7/1/75 TO 6/30/76 BASED ON THE NUMBER OF 
STUDENTS FROM EACH TOWN ATTENDING MINUTEMAN ON 10/1/74, AS A 
PERCENTAGE OF THE TOTAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS 



TOWN 


% 


OPERATING 


+ CAPITAL = 


ASSESSMENT 


ACTON 


9.859 


200,926 


68,862 


269,788 


ARLINGTON 


22.300 


454,474 


155,758 


610,232 


BELMONT 


9.390 


191,368 


65,586 


256,954 


BOX BOROUGH 


2.582 


52,621 


18,034 


70,655 


CARLISLE 


1,878 


38,274 


13,117 


51,391 


CONCORD 


9.859 


200,926 


68,862 


269,788 


LEXINGTON 


18.310 


373,158 


127,889 


501,047 


LINCOLN 


2.817 


57,411 


19,676 


77,087 


STOW 


3.286 


66,969 


22,951 


89,920 


SUDBURY 


10.094 


205,716 


70,503 


276,219 


WAYLAND 


8.451 


172,231 


59,027 


231,258 


WESTON 


1.174 


23,926 


8,200 


32,126 



TOTALS 



100.00% 



2,038,000 



698,465 



2,736,465 



I. OPERATING BUDGET 



DISTRICT ASSESSMENT 
1975-76 



Total Operating Budget 

Reimbursement 

Surplus 

Net Operating Budget 



$2,498,000 

- 450,000 

- 10,000 

$2,038,000 



II. CAPITAL BUDGET 

Capital Payment 
Interest 

Total Capital Budget 

Anticipated Reimbursement 

Net Capital Budget 



$1,300,000 
501,600 

$1,801,600 

- 1,103,135 

$ 698,465 



TOTAL ASSESSMENT 



152 



$2,736,465 



o o 

x> X) 



o 




o 




:r 


m 


o 


r*. 


to 


CTv 










<: 


■ 


o 


1— 






2: 


OC 


a: 


LU 


C_5 


CQ 


LxJ 


O 


I— 


1- 




<_> 


—I 


O 


< 




z 


Li- 





CD 


(—1 




1— 


to 


cC 


<c 


<_> 




O 


\— 


> 


•z. 




LU 


-J 


2: 


<c 


_J 


z: 


-J 










a: 





2 


LlJ 


LU 


q: 







w 




>N 




O 


C7> 


CO 


O 




T3 




03 




5-i 


in 


CJ 






U 




•H 




u 



to cm 10 O 





X 


Oi 


co 




O 


CM 


^C 





CQ 






IH 

















-O 








03 


(/I 






fc 


t— 1 


to 


CN1 


O 


■H 


1-1 


CM 









X 










c 




&0 






c 









3 


O 









•p 


•M 


O 




T3 


+-> 




GO 


c 


U 


10 


J-i 


DC 


c 


c 





O 


•H 


O 


c 





•H 


£ 


X> 


1 — 1 


O 


•H 


«J 






X 


u 


C 


X 





H 








o3 


O 


O 


< 


< 


CQ 


CQ 


u 


u 


J 



r^ ^ 00 

CM H tO 





•H 




bO 


** 




r-^ 


\£) 


1— t 










trt 




>, 




O 


to 


rd 






?H 


to 


•H 


» ' 


u 






•M 




c 




3 




O 




O 



153 



VITAL STATISTICS 



30 births, 55 marriages and 42 deaths have been recorded during the 
year 1975, as follows: 



BIRTHS 



Date 


of 




Birt 


h 

7 


Name of Child 


Jan. 


Rebecca DeNormandie Cannon 


Jan. 


8 


Anna Marie Rizzo 


Jan. 


10 


Brette Beatrice Kameny 


Jan. 


17 


Sarah Catherine Walker 


Jan. 


29 


Caragh Catherine Doyle 


Feb. 


8 


Jennifer Anne Zielinski 


Feb. 


27 


James Converse Todd 


Mar. 


3 


Kevin Barry Gottehrer 


Mar. 


19 


Charles Lowell Barzun 


Mar. 


24 


Jeannette Stephanie Millard 


Apr. 


2 


Ellery Whitman Kimball 


Apr. 


4 


Tessa Madison Higgins 


Apr. 


30 


Jared Michael Schmidek 


May 


31 


James Frederick Harrison 


June 


10 


Christoph Belanger 


July 


7 


Jennifer Ruth Kim 


July 


9 


Thomas Leonard Darling 


Aug. 


18 


Gordon Remkes Allen 


Aug. 


29 


Cindy Ann Buonopane 


Sept. 


2 


Shane Thomas O'Loughlin 


Sept. 


19 


Catherine Elizabeth Downey 


Oct. 


8 


Jennifer Bolten Landry 


Oct. 


14 


Leukos Hart Goodwin 


Oct. 


31 


Jeffrey Mark Westurn 


Nov. 


14 


Patrizia Fiscale 


Nov. 


20 


Erik Thomas Dreisbach 


Nov. 


20 


Jonathan Matthew Brand 


Dec. 


11 


Melissa Ann Schatzberg 


Dec. 


31 


Sarah E. Clagett 


Dec. 


31 


Emma M. Clagett 



Names of Parents 



Richard E 
Conrad H. 
Barry H. 
Roger M. 
David K. 
John R. $ 



Robert L. $ Betty R. Cannon 
William J. £ Jane L. Rizzo 
Stuart M. & Wendy W. Kameny 
John F. § Joan E. Walker 
Charles E. § Cathy J. Doyle 

. § Ellen L. Zielinski 

$ Harriet M. Todd 
& Patricia C. Gottehrer 
§ Serita W. Barzun 
§ Susan P. Millard 

Joan C. Kimball 
William M. § Johanna C. Higgins 
Henry H. § Mary L. Schmidek 
Henry F. § Elizabeth C. Harrison 
Michael P. § Gisa A. Belanger 
Samuel H. § Barbara M. Kim 
Oscar L. § Barbara A. Darling 
Richard A. 5 Petronella R. Allen 
Paul J. § Mary M. Buonopane 
John J. § Rosemary O'Loughlin 
Edward F., Jr. § Elizabeth Downey 
Christopher K. § Gisela B. Landry 
Mark L. § Monica R. Goodwin 
Kenneth F. $ Deborah A. Westurn 
Joseph § Rosanna P. Fiscale 
Timothy A. § Patricia A. Dreisbach 
Edward M. § Marsha L. Brand 

Nancy R. Schatzberg 

Clagett $ Charlotte A. 
Hollister 
Donald C. Clagett & Charlotte A. 
Hollister 



Alan F. a 
Donald C. 



154 



MARRIAGES 



Date of 
Marriage 

1974 
Dec. 7 



1975 
Jan. 4 



Jan. 26 

Feb. 5 

Feb. 15 

Feb. 21 

Mar. 15 

Mar. 15 

Mar. 18 

Mar. 20 

Apr. 6 

Apr. 26 

Apr. 26 

May 3 

May 17 



Names 



Residence 



Warren E. Graf, Jr. 
Jane C. Zelinek 



Alexander Jenkins, III 
Judith Fong (Switzer) 

Bennett Blumenberg 
Gayle L. Kaufman 

Mark Goodwin 
Monica Burroughs 

Mark W. Minde 
Debra A. Cameron 

Arthur J. Koehler 
Deborah A. Welch 

Charles R. Swenson 
Eleanor B. Emmons 

Richard K. Morgan 
Kristina G. Mante 

John H. O'Brien, III 
Kum Cha Kim 

David R. Monahan 
Shirley A. Hanson 

Edward W. Henningsen, Jr, 
Charlene L. Worsham 

John H. Parke 

Shirley Goodwin Beaton 

Keith Allen Rose 
Diane Marian Venier 

Richard J . Cugini 
Elizabeth A. Cook 

Jeffrey Harold Bodmer 
Sandra Jean Turner 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Franconia, N.H. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Woburn, Mass. 
Reading, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Acton, Mass. 

Portland, Oregon 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Belmont, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Klong Jin, Korea 

Acton, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Centerport, N.Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Columbus, Ohio 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Natick, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 



155 



Date of 
Marriage 

May 17 

May 17 

May 24 

May 25 

May 31 

June 1 

June 7 

June 14 

June 14 

June 19 

June 21 

June 21 

June 28 

June 28 

June 29 

July 12 

July 13 



Names 



Residence 



Michael R. England 
Julie Haden Stiles 

George Fichter 
Ruth Ann Linstrom 

David G. Wyman 
Sandra G. Spooner 

William Herron McCormick 
Lydia Donaldson 

Christopher E. Mann 
Leslie Morrison Birch 

Nathan S. Birnbaum 
Batya Hannah Yavne 

Joseph J. Salabarria 
Nancy E. Bergen 

Christopher S. Pitt 
Dorothy B. Mead 

Mark Ramras 
Elizabeth Allison 

Irving H. Chase 
Rebecca Bradford Bailey 

Sean Carmoddy 

Leie Margolies Lindmann 

George V. McKenna, Jr. 
Claudia Ann Basile 

Jeffrey M. Sharp e 
Marguerite R. Gaudette 

John R. Delfs 
Elaine Woo 



Dennis Nardone 
Karen Hughes 

Carl Lincoln 
Erica R. Bastress 

James A. Peterson 
Susan D. Street 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Marblehead, Mass. 

E. Atlantic Beach, N.Y 
Lincoln, Mass. 

South Portland, Me. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Middleburg, Va. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Boston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Belmont, Mass. 

Cambridge , Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cranston, R.I. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lee, Mass. 

Redondo Beach, Calif. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lynn, Mass. 
Concord, Mass. 

Scottsdale, Ariz. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Harwich Port, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



156 



Date of 
Marriage 

Aug. 2 

Aug. 3 

Aug. 10 

Aug. 10 

Aug . 1 6 

Aug. 17 

Aug. 17 

Aug. 17 

Aug. 22 

Aug. 23 

Aug . 24 

Aug . 24 

Sept . 6 

Sept. 6 

Sept. 13 

Sept. 20 

Sept. 27 



Names 



Residence 



Michael A. Wo If son 
Carolyn Sycle 

David F. Zorensky 
Diane B. Cohn 

Christopher M. Ireland, Jr. 
Deborah Ann Maniace 

Gerald W. Wilfert 
Kathleen DeMarco 

Robert H. Boughrum 
Carol Ann Maragret 

Carey A. Stone, III 
Beth A. Weckstein 

Richard Taylor 
Roberta (Kahn) Kaufman 

Yeprad J. Yarjan 

Heather J. (Parlee) Chizmas 

Richard E. Nessen 

Agnes L. (McCarthy) Watson 

Lawrence P. Dugan 
Paula J. Evangelista 



Marie G. Zuroff 
Lynn D. Hamberg 

Gary P. Pemberton 
Hannah Gregory 

Frederick Edmond McBreen 
Diane Barbara Primiano 

Basil C. Chigas 
Dianne M. Wasley 

Paul Steven Stone 
Karen Ellen Rasmus sen 

David W. Eddy 
Judith A. Rowe 

Ronald David Carsten 
Brenda Marie Marshall 



Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Jericho, N.Y. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Wilmington, Mass. 

Roselle Park, N.J, 
Weymouth, Mass. 

Houston, Texas 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Cambridge, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Reading, Mass. 
Stoneham, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Sudbury, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Acton, Mass. 
Acton, Mass. 

Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Arlington, Mass. 
Arlington, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 

Lowell, Mass. 
Waltham, Mass. 



157 



Date of 
Marriage 

Oct. 19 



Names 



Samuel Kafrissen 
Jeanne Barbara Berkman 



Residence 



Somerville, Mass 
Somerville. Mass 



Dec. 11 



Gary E. Beck 
Charlotte A. Price 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Dec. 14 



Richard N. Goodwin 
Doris H. Kearns 



Lincoln, Mass. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Dec. 20 



Augustus Lowell Putnam 
Barbara Blake Schmitz 



New York, N.Y. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



Dec. 27 



William Parker Oliver 
Winifred I -Bin Li 



Seattle, Wash. 
Berkeley, Calif. 



Dec. 29 



David Matthew Rosen 
Elizabeth R. Kindleberger 



Hagerstown, Md. 
Lincoln, Mass. 



DEATHS 



Date 


of 
:h 

8 


Name 




Age 




Deal 


Years 
75 


Months 


Days 


Jan. 


Walter Barthel 


-- 


Jan. 


13 


Albin V. Lind 


90 


3 


4 


Jan. 


17 


Wendell J. Waible 


74 


11 


21 


Feb. 


7 


Arthur Hubert Tetreault 


80 


11 


3 


Feb. 


8 


Eugene Lydiard 


63 


-- 


-- 


Feb. 


22 


Gladys deYongh (Field) Herman 


88 


8 


11 


Mar. 


3 


Berton V. Phinney, Jr. 


54 


9 


21 


Mar. 


12 


Donald P. Donaldson 


68 


7 


6 


Mar. 


15 


Helen Enman Ireland 


53 


7 


18 


Mar. 


16 


Vere R. Mix 


85 


11 


23 


Apr. 


3 


Sister Ann Joseph Thomas 









(Eveline Ada Thomas) 



94 



158 



Date 


of 


Death 


Apr. 


10 


Apr. 


13 


Apr. 


15 


Apr. 


17 


May 


4 


May 


13 


May 


23 


June 


7 


June 


14 


June 


22 


July 


8 


July 


20 


July 


28 


Aug. 


22 


Sept. 


10 


Sept. 


16 


Sept. 


29 


Oct. 


2 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


11 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


28 


Oct. 


30 


Nov. 


11 



Name 

Guilbert Winchell 

Hermon Hosmer Scott 

Reed Harwood 

Alice (Eldridge) Hunt 

L. Gladys (Sherman) Davis 

Stanley Ruszczyk 

Linda (Hedeman) Stockhoff 

Gladys (Hamilton) Griggs 

Elizabeth (Shaine) Senders 

Gaetano D'Amico 

Rebecca (Duval) Weber 

Georgette Tyrance 

Albert D. Johnson 

Anthony C. Bonaceto 

Milliage E. Morris 

Frances Cecelia Walton 

George Wells 

Alice G. (Thomas) Goodrich 

Richard K. Conant 

Elizabeth M. Rooney 

Guilbert D. Winchell 

Alice Burr age 

Marilyn Jean (Semla) Leonard 

Edmund P. Nawoichik 

Rita (Coburn) Heald 

Robert J. Westcott 

159 



Age 



Years 


Months 


Days 


90 


6 





66 





15 


67 


7 


14 


84 


3 


11 


82 


9 


17 


70 


7 


23 


89 


7 


24 


79 


8 


17 


86 


-- 


-- 


79 


-- 


-- 


96 


4 


21 


25 





16 


85 


4 


8 


70 


6 


10 


75 


7 


21 


85 


2 


14 


68 


1 


5 


86 


4 


17 


90 


8 


8 


70 


— 


-- 


25 





2 


91 


2 





43 





10 


57 


-- 


9 


76 


2 


8 


24 


6 


19 



Date 


of 


Death 


Nov. 


12 


Dec. 


6 


Dec. 


8 


Dec. 


17 


Dec. 


23 



Name 

Edward Whitney Flint 

S. Ralph Jacobs 

Andrew Alexander Robey 

Dorothy Alden Anderson 

Martha Schaeffler (Sister Janet) 



Age 



Years 


Months 


Days 


73 


3 


9 


66 


5 


9 


77 


9 


22 


57 


2 


21 


90 


8 






160 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Abbott, John A. $ Diana B. 
Abbott, Margaret G. $ Walter D. 
Abco Realty Trust 
Ackley, Wallace E. § Ethel G. 
Adams, John & Patricia § Adams, 

Peter $ Sharon K. P. 
Adams, John Quincy 
Adams, John Quincy £ Lucy D. 
Adams, Margaret E. 
Adams, Ramelle C. 
Adams, Thomas B. 

Adamson, William M. § Barbara M. 
Adler, Harold $ Ivy Ruth 
Adler, Ivy Ruth 
Algeo, Leo J. & Elaine T. 
Algonquin Gas Transmission Co. 
Ali-Oglu, Egon 

Allen, Richard A. $ Petronella R. M. 
Allen, Robert L. & Carol E. 
Allison, John R. $ Marion S. 
Allison, William S. $ Caroline P. 
Althansen, Alex F. $ Emily D. L. 
American Tel. $ Tel. Co. 
Ammen, David L. § Judith B. 
Andersen, Grace A. 
Anderson, Carl L. § Dorothy A. 
Anderson, Lawrence B. § Rosina DuP. 
Anderson, Mildred D. & Ronald F. 
Andrew, Elaine 

Andrews, Francis S. & Dorothy W. 
Angel 1, Craig W. & Carolyn G. 
Ann Marie Beauty Chateau 
Aprille, Thomas J. § Amelia J. 
Armstrong, C. Robert 
Armstrong, John L. 
Art, Robert J. § Suzanne 
Atchley, Dana W., Jr. 
Atchley, Dana W. , Jr. § Barbara S. P. 
Austin, Richard C. & Marcia W. 
Avery, Abigail D. 



Baggs, Arthur, Jr. § Marion S. 
Bailey, Richard B. 
Bailey, Rebecca B. 
Bair, Medill § Sophia 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 34,400 


$ 2,184.40 




32,400 


2,057.40 




20,900 


1,327.15 




100 


6.35 




68,100 


4,324.35 


750 




47.62 




155,400 


9,867.90 




29,600 


1,879.60 




79,500 


5,048.25 


150 




9.52 




34,300 


2,178.05 




67,500 


4,286.25 




300 


19.05 




26,400 


1,676.40 


73,300 




4,654.55 




40,900 


2,597.15 




16,200 


1,028.70 




33,600 


2,133.60 




34,300 


2,178.05 




43,300 


2,749.55 




5,400 


342.90 


76,000 


7,500 


5,302.25 




53,400 


3,390.90 




121,200 


7,696.20 




31,100 


1,974.85 




49,800 


3,162.30 




21,500 


1,365.25 


50 




3.17 




66,400 


4,216.40 




56,300 


3,575.05 


1,200 




76.20 




13,300 


844.55 




48,700 


3,092.45 




82,800 


5,257.80 




23,600 


1,498.60 


100 




6.35 




43,800 


2,781.30 




56,100 


3,562.35 




35,400 


2,247.90 




30,000 


1,905.00 




700 


44.45 


150 


58,200 


3,705.22 




20,400 


1,295.40 



161 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Baird, Gordon P. $ Sarah F. 

Baldwin, Herbert L. $ Beatrice A. 

Baldwin, Robert H. § Susan 

Baldwin, Roger P. S Mary L. S. 

Ballou, Mildred A. 

Balogh, Karoly § Judith 

Banks, Ann S. M. 

Banks, Talcott M 

Barbarow, Ruth 

Barber, John W. , Jr. § Mary E. 

Barber a, Anthony A. § Eleanor E. 

Bardsley, Theodore J. $ Doris A. 

Bare, Bruce M. § Helen S. 

Barkas, Christopher W. § Mary Ann 

Barker, William R. § Barbara S. 

Barnaby, John M. $ Charlotte B. 

Barnes, Benjamin A. & Ann B. 

Barnet, James R. § Jane A. 

Barr, Edgar E. § Olive H. 

Barry, Jon T. £ Barbara M. 

Bartlett, James R. $ Regine A. 

Bassett, Kenneth F. £ Caroline 

Beal, Bruce A. § Enid L. 

Beal, Thomas P., Jr. $ Barbara B. 

Beaton, Shirley G. 

Beenhouwer, Owen § Lillemor 

Belanger, Michael P. § Gisa E. 

Belanger, Walter E. § Mary F. 

Bell, Donald G., Jr. 

Bell, C. Gordon $ Gwendolyn K. 

Bell, Roger A. 

Belle, Gene § Irene 

Bellizia, Francis E. 5 Mary H. 

Benedek, George 

Bennett, Doris E. 

Bent ley, Barbara Hyde 

Bentley, Robert P. 

Bentley, Robert P. § Joyce S. 

Berenson, Sheldon J. § Carol H. 

Bergen, Kenneth W. £ Emily F. 

Berger, Ralph § Carol H. 



Berman, Donald S. 
Bernard, Clark L. 
Bertolami, Leo 
Bibring, George L, 
Bienfang, Don C. ( 



i Edith M. 
i Susana R. 

§ Marcia G. 
Denise R. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 53,800 


$ 3,416.30 




38,300 


2,432.05 




79,000 


5,016.50 




37,600 


2,387.60 




12,300 


781.05 




45,100 


2,863.85 




33,400 


2,120.90 




179,400 


11,391.90 




9,200 


584.20 




21,500 


1,365.25 




33,800 


2,146.30 




15,900 


1,009.65 




38,100 


2,419.35 




28,500 


1,809.75 




19,200 


1,219.20 




41,200 


2,616.20 




40,900 


2,597.15 




88,000 


5,588.00 




34,100 


2,165.35 




53,800 


3,416.30 




35,000 


2,222.50 




19,700 


1,250.95 




76,700 


4,870.45 




71,700 


4,552.95 




22,300 


1,416.05 




2,900 


184.15 




15,300 


971.55 




28,700 


1,822.45 


4,700 




298.45 




33,800 


2,146.30 




22,500 


1,428.75 




27,000 


1,714.50 




27,500 


1,746.25 


300 




19.05 




21,200 


1,346.20 




11,200 


711.20 




7,000 


444.50 




45,300 


2,876.55 




24,100 


1,530.35 




72,400 


4,597.40 




39,600 


2,514.60 




21,300 


1,352.55 




18,900 


1,200.15 




22,600 


1,435.10 




26,600 


1,689.10 




24,800 


1,574.80 



162 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 





Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 




Value of 


Value of 


Real and 




Personal 


Real 


Personal 




Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


Bikales, Norman § Ann B. 


$ 


$ 57,100 


$3,625.85 


Billings, Bruce H. £ Sarah W. 




3,700 


234.95 


Birkett, James D. 5 Sarah P. 




18,400 


1,168.40 


Birmingham, James G. § Carolyn 




52,000 


3,302.00 


Bisbee, Marie E. 




19,500 


1,238.25 


Bjork, Albion P. £ Elizabeth 




39,900 


2,533.65 


Black, Everett A. 8, Anne E. 




101,800 


6,464.30 


Blanchard, Charles E. § Eilene 




18,100 


1,149.35 


Blood, David W. $ Iva D. 




21,500 


1,365.25 


Bobbitt, Lake H. $ Sarah G. 




26,400 


1,676.40 


Boccadoro, Joseph $ Ida 




1,100 


69.85 


Bockoven, John S. 


100 




6.35 


Bockoven, John S. & Dorothy R. 




22,700 


1,441.45 


Bodkin, John F. & Marilyn Kay 




29,600 


1,879.60 


Boersner, Wolfram A. £ Doris M. 




36,100 


2,292.35 


Bogner, Walter F. 




35,400 


2,247.90 


Bolt, Richard H. $ Katherine L. 




56,600 


3,594.10 


Bond, Roger B. $ Elizabeth C. 




28,100 


1,784.35 


Bonia, Walter J. 




27,100 


1,720.85 


Booth, Alice Burrage 




2,700 


171.45 


Booth, Robert H. 




63,400 


4,025.90 


Boquist, Wallace P. 




69,400 


4,406.90 


Boston Edison Company 


2,040,000 


3,200 


129,743.20 


Boston Gas Company 


490,000 




31,115.00 


Boston £ Maine Railroad 




2,200 


139.70 


Bower, Joseph L. $ Nancy M. 




51,000 


3,238.50 


Bowles, Clifford 




24,700 


1,568.45 


Bowman, Edward F. § Doreen W. 




22,800 


1,447.80 


Bowman, William A. § Zenta E. 




28,600 


1,816.10 


Boyce, Alice M. 




28,300 


1,797.05 


Boyce, James B. $ Manley B., II 




12,900 


819.15 


Boyce, Mary M. 




28,600 


1,816.10 


Boyer, Edward 




98,700 


6,267.45 


Boyer, Edward $ Donnelly, Roberta 




23,700 


1,504.95 


Boyer, John H. 




48,100 


3,054.35 


Boyer, Louis L. $ Elaine T. 




20,500 


1,301.75 


Boyer, Markley H. S Julie M. 




102,500 


6,508.75 


Bracken, Donald J. § Callahan, 








John W. 




23,300 


1,479.55 


Bradford, Robert L. $ Muriel H. 




19,200 


1,219.20 


Bradlee, Henry G., Ill, $ Sandra N. 




48,800 


3,098.80 


Bradley, Clifford $ Jeannette E. 




10,600 


673.10 


Brain, J. Walter $ Patricia L. 




17,000 


1,079.50 


Brannen, Robert C. $ Barbara A. 




23,700 


1,504.95 


Braude, Stephen E. $ Bettie J. 




78,200 


4,965.70 


Braun, Morton B. $ Esther K. 




35,400 


2,247.90 



163 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



§ Jeane H., Trs 

$ Lee G. 

G. 

G. $ Ruth M. 



Brennan, William L. § Eleanor A. 

Breslin, Margaret 

Brewster, Ellen Beebe 

Briggs, Susan L. 

Bromberg, Nathan S. § Selma 

Bronson, Franklin C. £ Catherine M 

Brooks, Paul 

Browne, Secor D. $ Mary D. 

Brown, Elizabeth G. 

Brown, John B. $ Ann P. 

Brown, Robert P. 

Brown, Robert W. 

Brownell, Robert 

Brownell, Robert 

Bruce, James A. $ Maureen F. 

Bucci, Frank P. § Arlene M. 

Buchan, William R. 

Buchan, William R. S Barbara C. 

Bucher, Edward A. $ Gail J. Phillips 

Buckler, Sheldon A. £ Marilyn L. 

Buerger, Martin J. § Lila 

Buonopane, Paul J. § Mary 

Burckett, Douglas M. & Phillippa C. 

Burk, George W. £ Ruth M. 

Burke, Ruth Bemis 

Burke, Walter J., 

Burnham, Robert B 

Burns, Melvin P. 

Burroughs, June M. 

Burt, William F. & Donna G. 

Burton, Priscilla M. 

Butler, William B. $ Mary Jane 

Butts, Louise M. 



Calkins, Charles W., Jr. 

Calkins, Charles W., Jr. § Martha A. 

Callahan, Helen T. 

Campobasso, Anthony B. § Dorothy M. 

Campobasso, Joseph R. § Mary Anne 

Cannon, Ellen DeN. £ Bradford 

Cantella, Anthony J. £ Brianne B. 

Cantlin, John H. $ Antoinette T. 

Caplan, Robert H., Ill, § Norma 

Caras, Byron $ Anastasia 

Caras, Ophair § Florence L. 



Jr. $ Helen M. 
$ M. Elaine 
Elizabeth F. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 21,300 


$ 1,352.55 


150 




9.52 




200 


12.70 




6,100 


387.35 




5,700 


361.95 




27,100 


1,720.85 




54,600 


3,467.10 




32,800 


2,082.80 




55,400 


3,517.90 




22,900 


1,454.15 




22,400 


1,422.40 




10,700 


679.45 


150 




9.52 




58,600 


3,721.10 




11,400 


723.90 




46,800 


2,971.80 


150 




9.52 




21,700 


1,377.95 




27,400 


1,739.90 




39,800 


2,527.30 




42,400 


2,692.40 




21,800 


1,384.30 




35,500 


2,254.25 




19,900 


1,263.65 




54,400 


3,454.40 




38,900 


2,470.15 




34,500 


2,190.75 




19,300 


1,225.55 




23,800 


1,511.30 




37,300 


2,368.55 




42,200 


2,679.70 




25,200 


1,600.20 




56,700 


3,600.45 


4,000 




254.00 




36,500 


2,317.75 




4,500 


285.75 




16,700 


1,060.45 




17,900 


1,136.65 




172,300 


10,941.05 




5,900 


374.65 




66,100 


4,197.35 




53,300 


3,384.55 




39,700 


2,520.95 




21,000 


1,333.50 



164 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Carol B. 
I Leona G. 
i Bertha L. 

of James S. 



Carley, John A. § Joan Keir 

Carlson, Christopher T. § Jane F. 

Carman, John W. $ Eleanor T. 

Carroll, Irene J. 

Carroll, Marjory M. 

Carroll, Richard P. § Nancy A. 

The Carroll School 

Carstensen, Warren S Evelyn G. 

Carter, John H. 

Casilio, Frank G. 

Caskey, Walter H. $ Anna H. 

Cassidy, Henry J. £ Verna E. 

Cassidy, Robert E. $ Isabelle 

Cassidy, Verna E. 

Caswell, John R. § 

Champeny, John C. I 

Chapin, Louise B. I 

Chapin, Margaret E. 

Chapman, Emily § Est. 

Chase, Barbara S. 

Cheever, Daniel S., Jr. § Abigail A. 

Cherniack, Jerome R. § Elizabeth E. 

Chiotelis, Charles L. $ Iasme J. 

Chipman, Robert H. $ Mary F. 

Chisholm, Edward C. & Margaret F. 

Chou, Harry H. S. $ Lily 

Chu, Chauncey C. $ Margaret C. Y. 

Chu, Ge Yao $ Wei Ying 

Church, Robert T. $ Priscilla S. 

Ciampi, Mary P. 

Cibel, Stanley A. $ Thelma W. 

Ciraso, Amelia 

Clagett, Donald C. § Charlotte 

Hollister 
Clare, Mary E. 

Clark, Clifford A. & Patricia D. 
Clark, Catharine T. & Est. of William 
Coan, Thomas $ Catherine M. 
Coane, Amolia 

Coastal § Suburban Realty Trust 
Coburn, Arthur L., Ill, & Ann B. 
Coburn, Edward S. 
Coburn, Edward S. $ Minnie E. 
Coffin, Stewart T. § Jane M. L. 
Cohen, Paul A. § Jane M. 
Cole, Edwin M. $ Lucy F. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


1 $ 40,700 


$ 2,584.45 


30,600 


1,943.10 


38,200 


2,425.70 


18,500 


1,174.75 


18,300 


1,162.05 


36,400 


2,311.40 


42,800 


2,717.80 


58,900 


3,740.15 


76,900 


4,883.15 


17,700 


1,123.95 


54,600 


3,467.10 


700 


44.45 


19,500 


1,238.25 


14,600 


927.10 


36,600 


2,324.10 


54,600 


3,467.10 


55,300 


3,511.55 


18,100 


1,149.35 


16,200 


1,028.70 


52,100 


3,308.35 


29,200 


1,854.20 


24,500 


1,555.75 


66,200 


4,203.70 


20,000 


1,270.00 


21,300 


1,352.55 


38,700 


2,457.45 


36,700 


2,330.45 


56,600 


3,594.10 


43,200 


2,743.20 


24,900 


1,581.15 


24,200 


1,536.70 


23,700 


1,504.95 


25,100 


1,593.85 


21,700 


1,377.95 


47,200 


2,997.20 


37,500 


2,381.25 


15,000 


952.50 


12,700 


806.45 


4,000 


254.00 


40,100 


2,546.35 


500 


31.75 


30,800 


1,955.80 


24,800 


1,574.80 


55,500 


3,524.25 


40,300 


2,559.05 



165 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Cole, Hugh $ Nancy V. 

Coleman, Mary Murray B. 

Collins, Edward C, II, § Susan P. 

Collins, Laurence A. $ Janet S. 

Comer ford, John F. $ Mary G. 

Comjean, Bruce P. § Marlies F. 

Comjean, Marc G. $ Judith K. 

Comstock, Charles B. § Joan M. 

Conant, Richard K. 

Cone, Thomas E., Jr. $ Barbara C. 

Conley, David P. 

Connell, James J. § Elizabeth J., Trs. 

Connolly, David 

Connolly, J. Irving § Evelyn 

Conroy, Grace W. 

Constant ine, Katherine P. 

Cook, David K. § Carmel C. 

Cook, Harry § Kathleen G. 

Cook, Jacqueline H. 

Cook, Paul W., Jr. $ Marion M. 

Coolidge, Henry P. $ Alice C. 

Coons, Richard D. $ Nancy J. 

Cooper, Amiel G. $ Lorna 

Cooper, E. Crawley $ M. Jane 

Cope, Alice DeN. 

Cope, Oliver $ Alice DeN. 

Cope, Thomas Pym § Elizabeth 

Copeland, Robert C. 

Corcoran, Robert P, 

Cormack, Allan M. 

Corrigan, Leo W. 

Corrigan, Mary K. 

Corrigan, Mary 

Cotoia, Anthony J. 

Cotoia, Lucy Mary Anne 

Cotoni, Joseph 

Courtney, Joseph D. § Elaine H. 

Cousins, Ashley B. 

Cousins, Jeanne B. $ Est. of Laurence 

Cowles, Addison $ Alexandra C. 

Cramer, Stuart C. § Leona 

Crandall, Stephen H. $ Patricia E. 

Crawford, John D. § Joanna W. 

Cressy, Mrs. Joseph 

Crook, Constance S. 

Crooks, Naomi Ann 



W. 

& Ruth R. 
§ Elizabeth D. 



$ Lucy M. A. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


» $ 30,400 


$ 1,930.40 


37,300 


2,368.55 


38,200 


2,425.70 


32,800 


2,082.80 


51,300 


3,257.55 


41,800 


2,654.30 


35,900 


2,279.65 


26,800 


1,701.80 


52,700 


3,346.45 


42,800 


2,717.80 


17,100 


1,085.85 


14,000 


889.00 


600 


38.10 


31,200 


1,981.20 


17,700 


1,123.95 


24,300 


1,543.05 


17,700 


1,123.95 


23,600 


1,498.60 


20,300 


1,289.05 


47,400 


3,009.90 


52,800 


3,352.80 


56,700 


3,600.45 


44,200 


2,806.70 


43,200 


2,743.20 


10,100 


641.35 


12,700 


806.45 


30,900 


1,962.15 


58,000 


3,683.00 


40,700 


2,584.45 


3,800 


241.30 


12,400 


787.40 


10,800 


685.80 


34,000 


2,159.00 


40,500 


2,571.75 


28,700 


1,822.45 


23,900 


1,517.65 


19,400 


1,231.90 


11,500 


730.25 


28,100 


1,784.35 


20,900 


1,327.15 


100 


6.35 


45,100 


2,863.85 


35,800 


2,273.30 


150 


9.52 


18,100 


1,149.35 


28,800 


1,828.80 



166 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Culver, Perry J. § Kate S. 
Cummings, William R. § Palma M. 
Cunningham, J. Lewis § Ruth P. 
Cunningham, Robert A. § Margaret 
Cunningham, Robert M. § Claire 
Cutter, Robert A. 



Dabney, Helen W. 

Dadmun, Harrie H. § Helen 

Dahl, Thyra 

D'Alleva, Carmine 

Dalli, Francis J. § Mary E. 

Dallos, Andras § Zsuzsanna 

Dalrymple, Chester £ Jean 

Dalrymple, Sidney C. £ Dorothy C. 

Damico, Louise 

D'Amico, Ralph P. § Elvira 

Damon, J. Gilbert § Priscilla A. 

Dane, Benjamin 

Dane, Benjamin § Alexandra C. 

Dane, Roger $ Lydia H. 

Daniels, Bruce G. $ Janet B. 

Danosky, Edward A. $ Mary C. 

Darling, Eugene M., Jr. 

Darling, 0. Leonard $ Barbara M. 

D'Arrigo Brothers Co. of Mass. 

d'Autremont, Chester C. 

d'Autremont, Chester C. $ Ruth W. 

Davidson, Robert W. § Cynthia A. 

Davis, Ethel B. 

Davis, Prescott L. 

Davis, Ronald C. § Barbara C. 

Davis, Sherman P. 

Davis, Sherman P. § Phyllis M. 

Davison, Alice P. 

Davy, Edgar W. $ Louise W. 

Dawes, Donald L. $ Ruth K. 

Dean, Emma W. 

Dean, William M. $ Lorraine C. 

DeBaryshe, Paul $ Louise 

DeCilio, Frank W. § Josephine R. 

Dee, Helena A. 

DeFord, William, Jr. 5 Kathryn W. 

DeJesus, John $ Geneva Ann 

D'Elia, John A. £ Maria Carmela 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 71,800 


$ 4,559.30 




26,200 


1,663.70 




21,200 


1,346.20 




36,900 


2,343.15 




23,600 


1,498.60 




47,700 


3,028.95 




38,700 


2,457.45 




44,300 


2,813.05 




21,100 


1,339.85 


1,300 




82.55 




64,700 


4,108.45 




19,500 


1,238.25 




53,900 


3,422.65 




44,900 


2,851.15 




27,200 


1,727.20 




100 


6.35 




25,200 


1,600.20 


300 




19.05 




70,500 


4,476.75 




104,300 


6,623.05 




56,100 


3,562.35 




28,700 


1,822.45 




30,500 


1,936.75 




35,400 


2,247.90 




11,500 


730.25 


100 




6.35 




74,400 


4,724.40 




12,500 


793.75 




19,600 


1,244.60 




82,700 


5,251.45 




21,600 


1,371.60 


100 




6.35 




18,000 


1,143.00 




50,100 


3,181.35 




28,200 


1,790.70 




28,600 


1,816.10 




15,300 


971.55 




21,000 


1,333.50 




27,600 


1,752.60 




23,300 


1,479.55 




18,700 


1,187.45 




26,900 


1,708.15 




27,500 


1,746.25 




5,400 


342.90 



167 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



DeLone, 

Delori, 

Delori, 

Demone, 

Denehy, 

Denehy, 

Denholm, 

Denison, 



Louis G. § Anne M. 
Francois C. § Rosamond P. 

§ Putnam, James A. 



Rosamond P 

Harold W. § Elsie R. 

Edward J. 

Edward J. § Bernadetta J. 
A. Stuart § Jane Leslie 
Mary Smith 
DeNormandie, James 
DeNormandie, James § Martha 
Derbyshire, Helen L. 
desCognets, Archer B. £ Gwendolyn G 
Desmond, Kenneth 

Desmond, Kenneth A. § Catherine A. 
DeVito, Mario A. $ Edith C. 
Dewey, Edward S. § Laurie T. 
Dewey, Laurie T. 
Dewey, Edward § Zella 
Dexter, Barbara C. 
Diab, Thomas A. 
Dickey, Dana H. £ Emy P. 
Dickie, Richard I. $ Julia G. 
DiGiovanni, Guy P. & Teresa E. 
Dillman, Douglas S. § Virginia S. 
Diminico, Louis § Antonetta 
Dixon, Milburn J., Trustee 
Dixon, Russell J. § Theresa J. 
Doherty, Elizabeth H. 
Doherty, Marjorie 
Doherty' s Garage, Inc. 
Doherty, William R. $ Phyllis M. 
Domenichella, Domenic 
Domenichella, Frank A., Jr. 
Domenichella, Frank A. $ Turano, 

Florence T. 
Donald, David H. $ Aida D. 
Donaldson, Astrid L. 
Donaldson, Charlotte L. 
Donaldson, David M. § Lynn B. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. 
Donaldson, Gordon A. £ Elizabeth A. 
Donaldson, Malcolm L. 
Donaldson, Robert D., Jr., Adm. 
Donkle, J. E. 

Donnell, Samuel H. § Marion L. 
Donovan, Donna M. 



300 



250 



150 



1,000 



400 



150 



$ 33,400 

32,600 

800 

26,800 

45,900 
43,400 
62,700 
80,500 
125,100 
100 
52,200 

23,300 
27,400 
59,300 

31,500 
62,300 
106,400 
19,300 
21,900 
29,700 
30,800 
48,600 

2,100 
26,100 
44,900 
16,400 
55,400 
22,100 

2,600 



19,600 
33,800 
83,100 

6,000 
24,500 
53,000 
41,700 
68,400 

9,400 

39,500 
26,400 



2,120.90 
2,070.10 

50.80 
1,701.80 

19.05 
2,914.65 
2,755.90 
3,981.45 
5,111.75 
7,943.85 
6.35 
3,314.70 

15.87 
1,479.55 
1,739.90 
3,765.55 
9.52 
2,000.25 
3,956.05 
6,756.40 
1,225.55 
1,390.65 
1,885.95 
1,955.80 
3,086.10 
133.35 
1,657.35 
2,851.15 
1,041.40 
3,581.40 
1,403.35 
165.10 

25.40 

1,244.60 
2,146.30 
5,276.85 

381.00 
1,555.75 
3,365.50 
2,647.95 
4,343.40 

596.90 

9.52 

2,508.25 

1,676.40 



168 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Donovan, Leo A. § Elinor C. 

Dooley, Thomas J., Jr. $ Helen 

Dorian, Newart d, Paul J. 

Dougherty, Allen R. & Helen M. 

Doughty, Joseph M. 

Dowling, John E. § Susan K. 

Downey, Edward F., Jr. § Elizabeth F, 

Downing, Grace L. 

Doyle, Charles E. 

Doyle, Richard F. 

Drago, Nicholas V, 

Drake, Lillian W. 

Drake Park Realty, 



$ Cathy J. 
£ Norma June 

§ Sara M. 
§ Garmory, Bertha V. 

Inc. 



Dreisbach, Timothy A. § Patricia F. 
Drew, Frederic T. $ Shirley D. 



Droska, 


Harriet 




Duane, 


Neil F. § 


Floretta E. 


DuBois, 


Anson M. 


§ Olive S. 


Duborgj 


George F 




Duffy, 


James E., 


Ill, S Barbara 


Dunne, 


Katherine 


D. G. 


Durnanj 


John P. § Leona E. 


Durr, Bruno G. $ 


Brigitte R. 


Dustin 


Daniel E 


. § Rachel S. 



w. 



Easterday, Charles L. $ Helen B. 

Eaton, Richard J. 

Eckhardt, Homer D. 

Edmonds, Dean S., Jr. $ Louise 

Ehrenfeld, John R. § Myrna G. 

Elder, George D. 

Elias, Eugene H. 

Elkus, Howard F. 

Elliott, Ethel M 

Elliott, William 

Ellis, Alexander 

Ellis, Eloise G. 

Elwood, David M. $ Carol Jean 

Emerson, Claire G. 

Emery, Mary B. 

Emery, Richard B. § Alice W. 

Emmons, A. Bradlee $ Judith Reed 

England, Albert E. & Priscilla S. 

Eppling, Frederic J. § Sarah J. 

Ericson, Herbert E. § Erlyne R. 



§ Diana H. 
$ Gail G. 
§ Lorna 

G. § Peggy P. 
, Jr. § Nancy B. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal ■ Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 63,500 


$ 4,032.25 


36,200 


2,298.70 


16,900 


1,073.15 


14,800 


939.80 


18,500 


1,174.75 


37,300 


2,368.55 


19,100 


1,212.85 


16,600 


1,054.10 


20,700 


1,314.45 


56,500 


3,587.75 


44,900 


2,851.15 


17,800 


1,130.30 


27,800 


1,765.30 


17,700 


1,123.95 


12,900 


819.15 


150 


9.52 


19,200 


1,219.20 


18,800 


1,193.80 


38,200 


2,425.70 


46,300 


2,940.05 


50,500 


3,206.75 


23,600 


1,498.60 


37,100 


2,355.85 


25,900 


1,644.65 


48,900 


3,105»15 


25,200 


1,600.20 


28,100 


1,784.35 


74,200 


4,711.70 


41,500 


2,635.25 


30,500 


1,936.75 


21,400 


1,358.90 


43,100 


2,736.85 


28,400 


1,803.40 


62,300 


3,956.05 


65,300 


4,146.55 


53,800 


3,416.30 


23,600 


1,498.60 


20,600 


1,308.10 


29,600 


1,879.60 


27,100 


1,720.85 


50,500 


3,206.75 


54,200 


3,441.70 


22,600 


1,435.10 


31,100 


1,974.85 



169 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Eshleman, Dean B. $ 

Evangelista, Florenzo T. § Dorothy L. 
Evans, Lewis M. § Mary Lou 
Evans, Lucius W. § Cynthia F. 
Everett, Robert R. 



$ 13,600 $ 863.60 

17,800 1,130.30 

25,400 1,612.90 

71,300 4,527.55 

29,600 1,879.60 



Faddoul, George P. § Natalie A. 
Fairbanks, Alan R. § Diane A. 
Faran, James J. $ Ellen G. 
Farley, Isabel K. $ State Street Bank 

& Trust Co., Trustees 
Fargo, Foster M., Jr. £ Susan C. 
Famy, Michael H. f, Ethel H. 
Farrar Village Conservation Trust, 

Trustees of 
Farrar Pond Village, Trustees of 
Farrell, Philip J. & Ruth E. 
Faunce, Mary Gill § Anthony 
Feeley, Gayle 
Feinberg, Bernice 
Feldman, Roger D. $ Deborah W. 
Felegian, Peter § Marion 0. 
Fenijn, Chris J. £ Yvonne 
Ferguson, Charles E. § Phyllis G. 
Fernald, George H., Jr. § Eleanor T. 
Ferri, Edward J. £ Eleanor J. 
Ferro, Armand F. § Jacqueline M. 
Finnerty, James J. & Anna C. 
Finnerty, Richard E. § Wendy M. 
Fiorelli, Ernest R. $ Rose M. 
Fisher, John W. 

Fitts, Gertrude W. § Est. of C. K. 
Fitzgerald, Derek J. £ Eleanor M. 
Fitzgerald, John H. $ Thelma C. 
Flannery, Constance H. 
Flannery, Donald J. 
Flannery, Donald J. £ Harriet E. 
Flansburgh, Earl R. $ Louise H. 
Fleck, James D. § Margaret E. 
Fleming, Clifford D. $ E. Frances 
Fleming, William H. $ Patricia H. 
Flint, Edward W., Executor 
Flint, Edward Whitney 
Flint, Edward F. £ Henry R. 
Flint, George B. § Lucie S. 
Flint, Peter § Janet B. 



450 



100 



26,000 


1,651.00 


100 


6.35 


39,800 


2,527.30 


28,400 


1,803.40 


22,900 


1,454.15 


16,800 


1,066.80 


20,000 


1,270.00 


653,000 


41,465.50 


28,600 


1,816.10 


49,700 


3,155.95 




28.57 


3,900 


247.65 


33,700 


2,139.95 


30,900 


1,962.15 


29,400 


1,866.90 


25,100 


1,593.85 


67,600 


4,292.60 


2,700 


171.45 


20,700 


1,314.45 


21,300 


1,352.55 


42,200 


2,679.70 


30,600 


1,943.10 


36,100 


2,292.35 


61,100 


3,879.85 


24,300 


i;543.05 


27,600 


1,752.60 


31,100 


1,974.85 




6.35 


12,200 


774.70 


41,500 


2,635.25 


8,900 


565.15 


24,700 


1,568.45 


49,100 


3,117.85 


5,300 


336.55 


6,500 


412.75 


57,800 


3,670.30 


19,500 


1,238.25 


22,200 


1,409.70 



170 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Flint, Robert M. $ Linda C. 

Flint, Warren F. 

Floyd, Olive B. 

Foley, Harold W. 

Foley, John F., Jr. $ Bassett, 

Caroline C. 
Ford, David, II, § Mary Gillingham 
Foster, J. Edward § Sara M. 
Frank, Robert C. $ Velma S. 
Franklin, J. Thomas $ Susan B. 
Fraser, Donald C. & Joanne 

M. 5 Donna A. 

T. 

$ Florence W. 
$ Deborah C. 

J, 



150 



Fraser, Robert 
Fratto, Joseph 
Freed, Charles 
French, John B 
Friel, Patrick 
Frost, Wesley T. $ 
Frullo, Frank 
Fullerton, Albert 
Fusillo, Michael G 



$ Charlotte A. 
October C. 

L., Jr. § Mary S. 
. $ Concetta G. 



400 



$ 100 
69,700 
27,100 
40,700 

20,600 
51,500 
30,500 
57,600 
44,200 
24,600 
24,100 
16,300 
33,600 
59,000 
54,500 
24,000 

37,300 
55,000 



$ 6.35 
4,435.47 
1,720.85 
2,584.45 

1,308.10 
3,270.25 
1,936.75 
3,657.60 
2,806.70 
1,562.10 
1,530.35 
1,035.05 
2,133.60 
3,746.50 
3,460.75 
1,524.00 
25.40 
2,368.55 
3,492.50 



Gagne, Lawrence E. § Dorothy Q. 
Gallitano, Alphonse L. $ Eleanor M. 
Gallitano, Leo § Alphonse L. , Trs. 
Gallitano, Alphonse L. S Eleanor M. 

Przbylski, John L. § Jean M. 
Gargill, Robert M. § Marion Lynn 
Garrison, David L. £ Alice E. 
Garrison, John B. § Barbara F. 
Garside, Alice H. 
Garth, John C. § Nancy M. 
Gary, Maida E. 

Gatchell, G. Gordon, Jr. 5 Esther A. 
Gavitt, A. David § Dorothy C. 
Gentile, Joseph F. $ Kathleen E. 
Gerson, Nathaniel C. § Sareen R. 
Gheith, Mohamed A. § Dorothy A. 
Giese, Paul E. £ Lucretia H. 
Gilbert, Francis 
Gilbert, John W. 
Gilfoy, Donald A, 
Gillis, John G. $ Maria F. 
Giurleo, James M. § Mary C. 
Glass, John 
Glass, John B. § Florence M. 



§ Josephine 
£ Helen B. 



300 



36,600 
38,000 
43,700 

6,600 
38,200 
58,600 
41,900 
27,600 
24,100 
25,900 
21,600 
400 
23,500 
34,600 
20,200 
21,000 
14,400 
14,000 
35,200 
45,500 

1,200 

31,000 



2,324.10 
2,413.00 
2,774.95 

419.10 

2,425.70 

3,721.10 

2,660.65 

1,752.60 

1,530.35 

1,644.65 

1,371.60 

25.40 

1,492.25 

2,197.10 

1,282.70 

1,333.50 

914.40 

889.00 

2,235.20 

2,889.25 

76.20 

19.05 

1,968.50 



171 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



$ Krouk-Gordon, 

$ Jean G. 
$ Martha L. 



Gleason, Nancy W. J. 
Goddard, Richard B. 
Goddard, Richard B. $ Karen E 
Goldlust, Jerry A. 
Gordon, Lester I 

Dafna 
Gounaris, Thomas X, 
Grabill, Elliott V. 
Graddis, Richard D. 
Grady, John K. & Elizabeth S 
Graf, Malcolm 
Graham, Mathilda R. , III 
Grande, Orlando S. k Rose P. 
Gras, Ranulf W. § Annette E. 
Grason, Rufus L. $ Edna B. 
Gray, Dorothy G., Extrx. 
Gray, Eugene 
Greaves, Allan W. 
Green, Jonathan W. 
Green, Laurence H. 
Green, Robert T. § 
Greenberger, Joel S. £ Martha S. 
Gregg, Earl F. § Doris H. (Est. of) 
Gregory, Mary 
Griffith, Patricia J. 
Griggs, Thomas I., Jr. § Annette M. 
Grim, William M., Jr. S Barbara M. 
Grinnell, William L. $ Virginia B. 
Grobleski, Margaret 
Gropius, Use $ Est. of Walter 
Gross, Thomas A. 0. $ Judith C. F. 
Grover, C. Stuart $ Gunilda G. 
Guarino, Guy E. § Frances I. 
Gulati, Ravi § Janet 
Gunaris, Theodore £ Rheta D. 
Gurski, Richard J. $ Harriett A. 
Gustafson, Craig S. & Louise M. 
Gustafson, J. Kenneth £ Janet L. 
Guthke, Karl S. $ Dagmar C. 
Guy, Donald C. § M. Cynthia 
Gyftopoulos, Elias P. § Artemis E. 



Haartz, John C, Jr. £ Beatrice R. 

Hadcock, Peter 

Hadcock, Peter W. $ Mary G. 



Theresa D. 
§ Louise L. 
§ Margot Perkins 
Catherine M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 46,800 


$ 2,971.80 




1,000 


63.50 




17,100 


1,085.85 




16,200 


1,028.70 




3,000 


190.50 




23,700 


1,504.95 




52,600 


3,340.10 




800 


50.80 




18,400 


1,168.40 




14,300 


908.05 




31,800 


2,019.30 




51,400 


3,263.90 




32,900 


2,089.15 




34,000 


2,159.00 




33,600 


2,133.60 




18,100 


1,149.35 




26,200 


1,663.70 




20,400 


1,295.40 




25,500 


1,619.25 




63,200 


4,013.20 




30,000 


1,905.00 




34,900 


2,216.15 


500 




31.75 




54,600 


3,467.10 




40,200 


2,552.70 




22,100 


1,403.35 




34,300 


2,178.05 


150 




9.52 




51,300 


3,257.55 




35,700 


2,266.95 




30,300 


1,924.05 




51,600 


3,276.60 




24,600 


1,562.10 




16,500 


1,047.75 




46,100 


2,927.35 




35,000 


2,222.50 




22,400 


1,422.40 




29,600 


1,879.60 




40,600 


2,578.10 




69,000 


4,381.50 




42,000 


2,667.00 


150 




9.52 




27,700 


1,758.95 



172 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Had ley, Henry H. $ Janna P. 

Haessler, Herbert A. $ Diane F. 

Hagenian, Joseph C. § Irene R. 

Haggerty, John S. 

Hagmann, Otto $ Katherine E. 

Hagopian, Charles S Stella 

Hamilton, Harry A. $ Bessie E. 

Hamilton, William L. § Lisa P. 

Hamlin, Mrs. Paul 

Hammond, John S. $ Nancy C. 

Hancock, John C. 

Hankey, Francis W. 

Hansen, C. Russel, 

Hanson, Adler M. § 

Hapgood, Norman, Jr 



$ Edna J. 
Jr. £ Pamela W. 
Madeline A. 
$ Ruth K. 



Hardy, Harriet L. £ Stewart, Jane H. 
Harney, Gregory G. § Anne W. 
Haroian, Henry § Jessie S. 
Haroutunian, Harry J. $ Anita G. 
Harrington, Clifford F., Jr. § 

Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harrington, Nancy 
Harrington, Winthrop W. , Jr. 
Harris, Melvyn H. 
Harris, Melvyn H. § Nancy M. 
Harris, Roger W. $ Evelyn A. 
Harrison, Henry F. duP. § Elizabeth 
Harvard Trust Co., Executors, u/w 

Walter Barthel 
Harvey, Harriet R. 
Harwood, Reed 

Hatsopoulos, George N. £ Daphne 
Haughey, Sylvia M., Extrx. 
Hawes, Donald 0. $ Lillian B. 
Hawkinson, Lowell B. § Suzanne 
Haworth, George G. § Thelma E. 
Haytayan, Harry M. § Katherine J. 
H. B. Knowles, Inc. 
Healy, Edward M. § Helen T. 
Healey, Harry R., Jr. S Jeanne C. 
Heart, Frank E. $ Jane S. 
Heartt, Charlotte B. 
Heck, Mary Higbee 
Heijn, Cornelius, Jr. § Marion 
Helburn, Peter § Margaret 
Hemry, Leslie P. § Mary Jane 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 35,100 


$ 2,228.85 




50,200 


3,187.70 




19,100 


1,212.85 




30,000 


1,905.00 




31,600 


2,006.60 




24,300 


1,543.05 




16,900 


1,073.15 




16,800 


1,066.80 


150 




9.52 




50,400 


3,200.40 




8,000 


508.00 




43,600 


2,768.60 




15,100 


958.85 




29,300 


1,860.55 


150 


21,300 


1,362.07 




26,400 


1,676.40 




56,800 


3,606.80 




27,100 


1,720.85 




13,600 


863.60 




12,300 


781.05 




2,200 


139.70 


5,300 


74,200 


5,048.25 


100 




6.35 




48,000 


3,048.00 




16,400 


1,041.40 




66,700 


4,235.45 




26,300 


1,670.05 




15,800 


1,003.30 




60,800 


3,860.80 




177,300 


11,258.55 




42,800 


2,717.80 




32,500 


2,063.75 




27,200 


1,727.20 




29,900 


1,898.65 




22,600 


1,435.10 


9,400 


60,900 


4,464.05 




27,600 


1,752.60 




23,800 


1,511.30 




32,200 


2,044.70 




36,000 


2,286.00 




100,900 


6,407.15 




25,500 


1,619.25 




44,300 


2,813.05 




5,300 


336.55 



173 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Henderson, Barclay G. A. 

Henderson, Caroline G. 

Henderson, Robert S. 

Henderson, Robert S. S Caroline 

Hendrickson, Robert A. § Ruth Ann 

Henebry, Carolyn L. 

Herlin, Melvin A. § Eugenia T. 

Herman, Peter P. § Mary G. 

Herman, William F. 

Herschbach, Dudley R. § Georgene B. 

Herthel, Stephen W. § Evelyn S. 

Hester, Leon B. § Mary B. 

Hewitt, Elizabeth C. S George C. 

Hibben, George C. 

Hibben, George C. $ Julia K. 

Higgins, William M., Ill 

Hill, Craig C. § Heather D. 

Hill, H. Jay § Joan R. 

Hill, Jacques A. F. § Helen S. 

Hinds, Edward H. $ Edith M. 

Hoar, George W. $ Dorothy S. § Hoar, 

Norman W. § Shirley E. 
Hoben, Allan § Susan J. 
Hoch, Carole K. 
Hoch, Reimar H. H. 
Holbrow, Frederick § Florence G. 
Holland, Frederick C. $ Martha A. 
Holland, Peter A. § Marjorie L. 
Holland, Taffy K. 

Hollingsworth, Lowell M. & Florence 
Hollister, Walter M. $ J. Sally 
Home National Bank of Brockton, Tr. 
Hoover, Henry B. § Lucretia J. 
Horn, Michael C. $ Helen C. 
Home, Benjamin § Jean Y. 
Horwitz, Murray § Patricia F. 
Hosey, John E. § Margaret L. 
Houghton, Lillian £ Est. of John J. 
Housman, Frank M. $ Ruth B. 
Howard, Elizabeth F. 
Howard, Joseph W. 
Howard, Joseph W. § Sally E. 
Hubbard, Eliot, Jr. 
Hughes, Robert John £ Vera Elizabeth 
Hunsaker, Jerome C, Jr. 
Hunt, Merrill T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 10,900 


$ 692.15 


150 




9.52 




1,300 


82.55 




33,100 


2,101.85 




20,400 


1,295.40 




59,000 


3,746.50 




37,000 


2,349.50 




20,200 


1,282.70 




58,700 


3,727.45 




42,200 


2,679.70 




60,100 


3,816.35 




41,700 


2,647.95 




26,700 


1,695.45 


50 




3.17 




43,800 


2,781.30 




18,200 


1,155.70 




56,100 


3,562.35 




56,800 


3,606.80 




49,500 


3,143.25 




80,900 


5,137.15 




30,700 


1,949.45 




28,100 


1,784.35 




18,100 


1,149.35 




15,000 


952.50 




17,400 


1,104.90 




49,600 


3,149.60 




22,400 


1,422.40 




27,600 


1,752.60 




45,400 


2,882.90 




28,000 


1,778.00 




27,900 


1,771.65 




35,400 


2,247.90 




43,600 


2 ,768.60 




55,800 


3,543.30 




39,000 


2,476.50 




17,100 


1,085.85 




14,600 


927.10 




58,700 


3,727.45 




5,700 


361.95 


150 




9.52 




40,000 


2,540.00 




46,500 


2,952.75 




41,500 


2,635.25 




90,500 


5,746.75 




19,500 


1,238.25 



174 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Hunter, J. Samuel § Susan C. 

Huntley, Lottie D. 

Huntley, Medford E. § Blanche L. 

Hurd, Joseph F., Trustee 

Hurd, Nancy Dabney 

Hurff, Joseph L. $ Elizabeth C. 

Hutchinson, James A., Jr. 

Hyde, Benjamin D. $ Mildred B. 



Ide, Kenton J. $ Christel 

Iliescu, Nicolae & Esther 

Ingard, K. Uno £ Doris C. 

Ireland, Christopher § Helen T. 

Irwin, Mary M. 

Ives, David 0. $ Cecilia van Hollen 



Jackson, Gardner, Jr. § Sal lie 
Jackson, Huson $ Polly F. 
Jacob, Fred $ Eva 
Jacobs, S. Ralph § Frances L. 
Jagger, James M. § Miriam H. 
James, Hamilton R. § Waleska E. 
Janes, G. Sargent § Ann B. 
Jeffrey, Joseph H. £ Louise A. 
Jenal, Robert L. & Irene D. 
Jenney, Charles J. £ Katrina C. 
Jennings, Charles E. § Ann V. 
Jensen, Holgar J. § Grace A. 
Jerodel Realty Trust 
Jevon, Robert W. § Virginia B. 
Jewett, Julie Davis 
John, DeWitt § Morley M. 
Johnson, Albert D. 
Johnson, Ernest L. 
Johnson, Ernest L. § Grace M. 
Johnson, H. W. £ M. Jeannine 
Johnson, Kenneth A. § Gladys 
Johnson, Sandra Ann 



Kahn, Martin H. $ Susan B. 
Kamborian, Jacob S., Jr. $ Nancy M. 
Kameny, Stuart M. § Wendy W. 
Kano, Cyrus H. § Dorothy 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 44,400 


$ 2,819.40 


15,300 


971.55 


16,700 


1,060.45 


50,900 


3,232.15 


29,600 


1,879.60 


31,800 


2,019.30 


22,900 


1,454.15 


36,900 


2,343.15 


22,600 


1,435.10 


33,200 


2,108.20 


37,900 


2,406.65 


26,600 


1,689.10 


40,800 


2,590.80 


33,100 


2,101.85 


25,200 


1,600.20 


54,600 


3,467.10 


32,100 


2,038.35 


75,400 


4,787.90 


38,300 


2,432.05 


66,600 


4,229.10 


37,400 


2,374.90 


23,900 


1,517.65 


50,800 


3,225.80 


28,600 


1,816.10 


33,600 


2,133.60 


17,600 


1,117.60 


61,400 


3,898.90 


33,800 


2,146.30 


41,000 


2,603.50 


35,000 


2,222.50 


11,400 


723.90 


35,400 


2,247.90 


42,300 


2,686.05 


53,000 


3,365.50 


32,200 


2,044.70 


65,200 


4,140.20 


45,700 


2,901.95 


94,300 


5,988.05 


36,000 


2,286.00 


27,800 


1,765.30 



175 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Kaplan, Leonard J. § Pearl B. 
Kasperian, Karl D. § Carol 0. 
Kassner, Michael A. § Patricia A. 
Kaufman, Marcia W. 
Kaye, Harold & Alice S. 
Keay, Donald P. § Mary Ann L. 
Keevil, Charles S., Jr. 
Keevil, Charles S., Jr. £ Hannah M. 
Keily, Delbar P. § Gertrude E. 
Kelleher, Robert J. $ Katherine J. 
Kelleher, Thomas E. 
Kellner, Joan 

Celina Robbins 



Kellogg, 
Kellogg, 
Kennedy, 
Kennedy, 



Deryn 
Albert 
John T. 



Kennedy Land Corporation 

Kerrebrock, Jack L. 5 Bernice M. 

Kessel, Joseph B. § Lesley J. 

Ketchum, Anne C. 

Ketteringham, John M. § Susan M. 

Keuper, Charles S. 

Keuper, Charles S. £ Elinore W. 

Keyes, Janet T. 

Kim, Samuel H. § Barbara M. 

Kindleberger, Charles P. $ Sarah M, 

King, Eleanor T. 

King, William A. £ Elizabeth P. 

King, William Tappan £ Jeanne M. 

Kirby, Gerard L. 

Kirkpatrick, Margaret M. 

Kistiakowsky, Irma E. 

Kitses, Steven J. $ Mary H. 

Kj el lander, Mary C. 

Kling, John W. d, Louise H. 

Klobuchar, John A. § N. Maribeth 

Knoop, Christopher 

Knoop, Christopher B. 5 Jan M. 

Knowlton, Esther Grace 

Koehler, Edward F. $ Margaret M. 

Kolligian, Zoe 

Kolodny, Myer Z. £ M. Lillian 

Koopman, Bernard 0. § Jane B. 

Korhonen, Edwin J. § Miriam 

Kornfeld, George R. £ Hulen S. 

Koumantzelis, Arthur G. $ Vaia T. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 23,400 


$ 1,485.90 




70,600 


4,483.10 




18,400 


1,168.40 




35,600 


2,260.60 




25,400 


1,612.90 




36,300 


2,305.05 


2,950 




187.32 




37,200 


2,362.20 




17,600 


1,117.60 




40,400 


2,565.40 




16,100 


1,022.35 




14,300 


908.05 




101,100 


6,419.85 


200 




12.70 




3,800 


241.30 


300 




19.05 




65,400 


4,152.90 




42,600 


2,705.10 




30,400 


1,930.40 




31,400 


1,993.90 




22,900 


1,454.15 


275 




17.46 




74,300 


4,718.05 




24,700 


1,568.45 




39,400 


2,501.90 




33,400 


2,120.90 




32,600 


2,070.10 




19,200 


1,219.20 




72,700 


4,616.45 




22,000 


1,397.00 




34,900 


2,216.15 




46,600 


2,959.10 




37,400 


2,374.90 




30,600 


1,943.10 




24,400 


1,549.40 




29,200 


1,854.20 


150 




9.52 




17,000 


1,079.50 




18,000 


1,143.00 




31,300 


1,987.55 




86,800 


5,511.80 




31,400 


1,993.90 




26,700 


1,695.45 




22,500 


1,428.75 




22,800 


1,447.80 




57,200 


3,632.20 



176 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Kramer, Ruth L. 

Kruse, Jurgen M. $ Alice S. 

Kubik, Charles S. 

Kuhns, Roger J. § Roberta B. 

Kurzina, Peter S. § Stephanie 0. 

Kusleika, Steven § Louise C. 

Kwasniak, Walter F. 



Lackner-Graybiel, James R. § Ann M. 

Lahey, Heirs of James 

Lahnstein, Richard K. 

Lakari, David 

Lambie, Ann H. 

Landry, Christopher K. § G. Barrie 

Lane, J. Frank § Kathleen F. 

Lang, Richard E. § Betty Lee 

Langdon, Haven W. 

Langton, William G. § Jane G. 

Lankhorst, Bernice C. § Greeley, 

James M. 
Lankhorst, Beverly P. 
Larson, John B. $ Mafalda M. 
Larson, Robert C. $ Betty F. 
Laurence, Kenneth § Lynda Wilson 
Laverty, Charles & Lillian L. 
Lavine, Jerome M. § Mary C. 
Lavrakas, Apostle § Fofo 
Lawson, Harold E. 
Lawson, Harold E. £ Wanda E. 
Lawson, John R. £ Rebecca S. 
Lay, Kenneth W. § Virginia A. 
Lazaridis, Lazarus J. § Suzanne 
Leape, Martha P. 
Leathern, Evelyn K. 
Leaver, Robert 0. § Barbara S. 
Lee, Paul H. § Frances Sue 
Lee, Richard S. 
Lee, Shih Ying § May C. 
Lee, Thomas H. § Barbara F. 
LeGates, John 
Leger, Mary E., Trustee 
Leggat, Thomas E. § Barbara B. 
Lemander, William C. $ Emily K. 
Lemire, Robert A. § Virginia M. 
Lenington, Robert L. § Carolyn J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 35,100 


$ 2,228.85 




22,800 


1,447.80 




33,100 


2,101.85 




49,200 


3,124.20 




25,100 


1,593.85 




23,600 


1,498.60 




28,800 


1,828.80 




28,200 


1,790.70 




5,400 


342.90 




14,800 


939.80 


300 




19.05 




32,700 


2,076.45 




40,400 


2,565.40 




56,300 


3,575.05 




44,900 


2,851.15 




22,500 


1,428.75 




43,400 


2,755.90 




26,700 


1,695.45 




26,200 


1,663.70 




23,800 


1,511.30 




29,500 


1,873.25 




22,300 


1,416.05 




46,200 


2,933.70 




29,800 


1,892.30 




10,700 


679.45 


1,350 




85.72 




34,800 


2,209.80 




36,300 


2,305.05 




41,800 


2,654.30 




36,100 


2,292.35 




37,500 


2,381.25 




4,200 


266.70 




37,800 


2,400.30 




2,800 


177.80 




27,200 


1,727.20 




44,200 


2,806.70 




26,700 


1,695.45 


150 




9.52 




20,600 


1,308.10 




50,300 


3,194.05 




41,700 


2,647.95 




36,500 


2,317.75 




26,200 


1,663.70 



177 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Lennon, El in § Est. of James V. 

Leshick, Joseph J. § Margaret F. 

Leslie, Paul M. § Elizabeth M. 

Levey, Harold A., Jr. § Ruth P. 

Levi, Nancy 

Levin, Betty 

Levin, Alvin § Betty 

Lewis, Marion S., Trustee 

Lewis Street Realty Trust 

Li, Yao T. $ Nancy T. 

Liddick, Harold S. & Virginia D. 

Liepins, Atis A. $ Diana 

Light, Galen D., Jr. § Lois McClure 

Lightbody, John W. , Sr. $ Muriel G. 

Lincoln Auto Service, Inc. 

Lincoln Beauty Salon 

Lincoln Homes Corporation 

Lincoln Old Town Hall Corporation 

Lincoln Plumbing $ Heating 

Lindsay, Franklin A. $ Margot C. 

Lingos, John C, Stamatia § George 

Linnell, Zenos M. § Geraldine H. 

Linnell, Zenos M. £ Kathleen G. 

Linnell, Zenos M. $ Kathleen G., 

Stanley, Francis E. $ Suzanne R. 

Caswell, John Ross § Carol B. 
Linstrom, Peter J. § Maybelle L. 
Lin-Way Realty Trust 
Lippman, Anne F. $ Richard J., Trs. 
Litte, Rudolph 

Little, John D. C. $ Elizabeth A. 
Lo, Steven Shih Ting $ Yi-Chao M. 
Lockwood, Dunbar, Jr. § Irene P. 
Loewenstein, Paul § Sophie 
Loud, John F. $ Mary L. 
Loud, Robert L. $ Gwyneth E. 
Loughlin, Leona K. 
Ludden, John M. § Susan F. 
Lunn, Paul W. $ Rose F. 
Lustwerk, Ferdinand § Ingeborg J. 
Lutnicki, Victor A. $ Harriet H. 
Lynde, Donald § Pamela Anne 
Lyon, Ruth 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 27,300 


$ 1,733.55 




41,000 


2,603.50 




15,700 


996.95 




25,700 


1,631.95 


300 




19.05 


500 




31.75 




43,500 


2,762.25 




49,500 


3,143.25 




66,700 


4,235.45 




49,600 


3,149.60 




24,500 


1,555.75 




37,500 


2,381.25 




27,400 


1,739.90 




33,100 


2,101.85 


1,000 




63.50 


1,550 




98.42 




84,500 


5,365.75 




11,700 


742.95 


750 




47.62 




80,800 


5,130.80 




35,400 


2,247.90 




29,300 


1,860.55 




50,900 


3,232.15 




500 


31.75 




23,300 


1,479.55 




31,900 


2,025.65 




24,300 


1,543.05 




34,600 


2,197.10 




31,900 


2,025.65 




21,200 


1,346.20 




55,700 


3,536.95 




33,500 


2,127.25 




49,400 


3,136.90 




16,100 


1,022.35 




16,900 


1,073.15 




35,000 


2,222.50 




21,200 


1,346.20 




29,300 


1,860.55 




52,400 


3,327.40 




17,000 


1,079.50 




16,900 


1,073.15 



178 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Malloy, 
Maloney 
Manion, 



§ Adeline A. 



§ Lucia T. 
§ Wendy Snyder 

$ Alice 

Anastasia 
§ Jeanne M. 
Eleanor D. 



& lone W. 



Jr. $ Carol E. 



MacDiarmid, John A. & Marion M. 

Maclnnis, Daniel A. § Hazel A. 

Mackenzie, Ethel L. 

MacKenzie, Murdoch J 

Maclaurin, Elfriede 

Maclaurin, Ellen 

MacLean, H. Arnold $ Corinne C 

MacLeod, Edward, Jr. § Mary M. 

MacLeod, Josephine F. 

MacMahon, D'Arcy G 

MacNeil, Ronald L. 

Madio, Frederick R 

Mahan, Russell P. 

Mahoney, Gerald J. 

Mahoney, John D. § 

Maier, Emanuel 5 Sylvia 

Malloy, David C. 

Malloy, Matthew J 

Malloy, Robert 

Malloy, Robert M. 

Malloy, Robert M. 

Terese A. 
Richard G., Trustee 

David R. S Noel L. 
Mannarino, Joseph § Florence A. 
Manning, Catherine L. 
Mansfield, James S. £ Sarah C. 
Manzelli, Donald M. § Janet G. 
Manzelli, John § Dorothy 
Manzer, Deward F. § Virginia 
Mar, James W. § Edith 
Marcks, Ronald H. £ Barbara W. 
Marden, John A., et als, Trs. 
Maroni, Jacques R. 
Marsh, Margaret B. 
Marsh, Paul E. S Margaret B. 
Martin, Robert T. £ Margaret M. 
Martini, William F. § Virginia J. 
Mason, Max, Jr. & Betty M. 
Mason, Richard K. $ Ann E. 
Mason, William C. $ Virginia 
Massachusetts Audubon Society, Inc 
Massachusetts Centers, Inc. 
Massachusetts Port Authority 
Mathieu, Alix 
Maxwell, Ralph E. $ Phyllis B. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 40,800 


$ 2,590.80 


17,200 


1,092.20 


36,300 


2,305.05 


24,000 


1,524.00 


47,600 


3,022.60 


34,000 


2,159.00 


27,200 


1,727.20 


10,000 


635.00 


16,000 


1,016.00 


61,300 


3,892.55 


16,000 


1,016.00 


21,500 


1,365.25 


55,400 


3,517.90 


23,800 


1,511.30 


39,600 


2,514.60 


41,700 


2,647.95 


13,300 


844.55 


2,700 


171.45 


500 


31.75 


69,300 


4,400.55 


22,000 


1,397.00 


17,200 


1,092.20 


64,700 


4,108.45 


30,400 


1,930.40 


15,700 


996.95 


16,700 


1,060.45 


34,000 


2,159.00 


55,100 


3,498.85 


20,100 


1,276.35 


38,700 


2,457.45 


28,200 


1,790.70 


39,600 


2,514.60 


1,400 


88.90 


44,700 


2,838.45 


150 


9.52 


46,300 


2,940.05 


29,800 


1,892.30 


29,500 


1,873.25 


27,600 


1,752.60 


21,800 


1,384.30 


38,700 


2,457.45 


80,000 


5,080.00 


388,800 


24,688.80 


83,900 


5,327.65 


37,700 


2,393.95 


39,900 


2,533.65 



179 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Personal 

Estate 



Aggregate 

Value of 

Real 

Estate 



Tax on 
Real and 
Personal 

Estate 



Mayfield, Glover B. $ Gale S. 

McClennen, Alan § Louise H. 

McConchie, James H. 

McCune, William J. $ Elizabeth 

McCurdy, Michael Charles § Deborah L. 

McDonald, Robert 

McEnness, Harold F. 

McGarry, Anne W. 

McGrath, Mary F. 

McHugh, John E. 

Mclninch, Bill $ Bonnie June 

Mclnnis, Donald G. 

Mclntyre, Adelbert $ Constance 

McKennan, Alice W. 

McKnight, David B. $ Ernest T., d/b/a 

McKnight's Nursery § Landscape 

Service 
McKnight, David B. § Eleanor J. 
McKnight, Katherine E. 
McLean, John L. 5 Ann A. 
McLellan, John W. $ Julia C. 
McLeod, James $ Ethel B. 
McMahon, Howard § Lucile N. 
McMorrow, Richard H. , Jr. § Maureen C. 
McNulty, Thomas F. § Mary S. 
McPherson, William W. $ Kathryn L. 
McWade, Paul E. $ Lucille C. 
Meade, Edmund J. $ Eleanor H. 
Mead, Varnum R. § Janice H. 
Mead, Varnum R. $ Thacher, Ralph, Trs. 
Mecsas, Michael E. 6, Mary J. 
Meeks, M. Littleton § Louise V. 
Meenan, Peter § Marion Morey 
Melanson, Leonard J. $ Mary 
Melchior, Siri 
Meriam, Ellin F. 
Meriam, Richard S. $ Alice G. 
Merrill, Vincent N. § Anne S. 
Merry, Glen W. $ Susan B. 
Messina, Elena C. 
Messina, Grazia § Est. of Jaspare 
Meyer, James W. d, Carol H. 
Michener, Martin C. § Susannah H. 
Mi lender, Sumner N. § Edith M. 
Millard, Donald A. 5 Jeannette D. 
Millard, Donald A., Jr. § Catherine C. 



150 



150 



$ 42,600 
57,900 
55,800 
49,200 
25,600 

5,700 
45,500 
43,200 

6,700 
34,700 
23,400 
28,600 
38,800 

4,700 
19,700 
18,300 
18,500 
14,300 

9,300 
99,500 
43,000 
65,600 
35,900 
44,700 
33,300 
24,700 
21,000 
36,300 
35,500 
43,200 
15,800 

25,900 
6,300 
25,000 
65,600 
57,900 
22,900 
34,600 
10,100 
47,900 
59,300 
73.300 



2,705.10 

3,676.65 

3,543.30 

3,124.20 

1,625.60 

9.52 

361.95 

889.25 

743.20 

425.45 

203.45 

485.90 

1,816.10 

2,463.80 



298.45 
1,250.95 
1,162.05 
1,174.75 

908.05 

590.55 
6,318.25 
2,730.50 
4,165.60 
2,279.65 
2,838.45 
2,114.55 
1,568.45 
1,333.50 
2,305.05 
2,254.25 
2,743.20 
1,003.30 
9.52 
1,644.65 

400.05 
1,587.50 
4,165.60 
3,676.65 
1,454.15 
2,197.10 

641.35 
3,041.65 
3,765.55 
4,654.55 



180 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



, § Marcheta A. 
, & Sophie B. 
Helen 
Isabel 



Florence 
§ Josephine C. 
Jr. $ NeGarre H. 



M. 



Millard, John D. § Jane L 

Millard, Susan § David K. 

Miller, Harold T 

Mintz, Norbett L 

Mix, Thomas R. $ 

Mixon, Scott I. § 

Mlavsky, Abraham I. § Sally 

Mohr, John J. § Jean F. 

Moller, Cynthia 

Montgomery, Maurice M., Jr. 

Moody, Charles P 

Moore, Murvale H 

Moore, Paul 

Moore, Robert L. § Dorothy H. 

Moor, Edgar J. § Joan R. 

Morency, Alfred J. $ Mary V. 

Morette, Walter J. $ Gertrude C. 

Morey, Kenneth & Ruth I. 

Morgan, Henry M. § Gwen G. 

Morris, Lloyd § Katherine 

Morris, Milliage E. 

Morris, Milliage E. $ Beatrice 

Morrissey, J. Neil $ Mary F. 

Morrissey, J. Neil 

Morse, Thomas R. 

Morse, William H. § Marguerite D. 

Morse, William H. $ Patricia A. 

Moss, Leonard G. § Frances S. 

Moss, Rodney E. $ Elizabeth T. 

Mount, Wayne D. £ Claire L. 

Mozzi, Robert L. $ Ruth M. 

Mrakovich, David V. § Gertrude A. 

Mrugala, Anthony J. 

Mrugala, Frances T. 

Mueller, Robert K. $ Jane K. 

Mukhitarian, Samuel § Stephanie 

Mullaney, Joseph E. & Rosemary W. 

Mulroy, Michael J. $ Judith 

Munroe, William C 

Murphy, Persis S. 

Murphy, Daniel J. 

Murphy, Edward W. 

Murphy, Mary B. 

Murphy, Mina Dorothea 

Murphy, William F. & Ruth M. 

Mutschler, Louis H. § Phyllis 



, Jr. 5 Mary W. 
$ Est. of Cyrus 
5 Louise C. 
$ Marjorie A. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 39,400 


$ 2,501.90 




42,800 


2,717.80 




48,100 


3,054.35 




42,800 


2,717.80 




33,900 


2,152.65 




29,900 


1,898.65 




60,600 


3,848.10 




100,000 


6,350.00 




17,200 


1,092.20 




16,500 


1,047.75 




27,800 


1,765.30 




31,800 


2,019.30 




100 


6.35 




26,500 


1,682.75 




47,600 


3,022.60 




54,500 


3,460.75 




33,700 


2,139.95 




16,800 


1,066.80 




43,000 


2,730.50 




21,200 


1,346.20 


50 




3.17 




10,300 


654.05 




21,500 


1,365.25 


770 




48.89 




38,100 


2,419.35 




20,400 


1,295.40 




31,900 


2,025.65 




25,800 


1,638.30 




17,300 


1,098.55 




30,600 


1,943.10 




35,700 


2,266.95 




34,500 


2,190.75 


450 


23,500 


1,520.82 




1,900 


120.65 




54,700 


3,473.45 




18,400 


1,168.40 




55,800 


3,543.30 




15,900 


1,009.65 




27,200 


1,727.20 




22,100 


1,403.35 




16,500 


1,047.75 




26,900 


1,708.15 




21,200 


1,346.20 




16,800 


1,066.80 




43,900 


2,787.65 




34,200 


2,171.70 



181 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Myers , 
Myles, 



John A., Jr. § Lucy B. 
Theresa Anne £ J. Richard 



Naiman, Mark L. § Adeline L. 

Najjar, Edward G. § Gail T. 

Nardone, Anthony B. § Nancy E. 

Natoli, Donald J. S Lois M. 

Nault, Wilson S. § Marjorie A. 

Nawoichik, Edmund P. 5 Elsie I. 

Neely, Scott 

Neely, Scott $ Joan H. 

Neiley, Alexander H. $ Diana B. 

Neily, Clark M. £ Diane D. 

Nelson, Albert E. § Marjorie E. 

Nelson, Jean R. 

Nessen, E. Richard 

Nesto, Bruno R. & Eugenia R. 

Neumann, Sylvia B. £ Est. of Ernest 

Newbold, Thomas 

Newcombe, Charles A. § Lawrence S. 

Newell, Lena M. 

New England Tel. $ Tel. Co. 

Newman, Philip § Elsa L. 

Newman, Robert B. $ Mary Shaw 

Newton, George C, Jr. 

Newton, Harland B. $ Ethel A. 

Nichols, Judith A., Trustee 

Nickerson, Elizabeth Perkins 

Nicolaides, Costas C. § Anthoulla 

Niles, Muriel L. 

Niles, Robert L. $ Virginia M. 

Nockles, William A. $ Diane F. 



O'Brien, Daniel F. 

O'Brien, Daniel F. $ Mary T. 

O'Brien, Gloria 

O'Brien, John H. 

O'Brien, John H. £ Barbara M. 

O'Brien, Joseph A. £ Virginia 

Ogden, David D. § Virginia L. 

Old County Realty Trust 

Oliver, James A. § Fern S. 

Olivieri, James £ Dorothy M. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 


$ 


$ 22,400 


$ 1,422.40 




35,600 


2,260.60 




21,600 


1,371.60 




45,800 


2,908.30 




52,100 


3,308.35 




27,500 


1,746.25 




46,000 


2,921.00 




46,900 


2,978.15 


150 




9.52 




78,500 


4,984.75 




30,100 


1,911.35 




22,700 


1,441.45 




27,500 


1,746.25 




38,400 


2,438.40 




50,700 


3,219.45 




32,900 


2,089.15 




42,900 


2,724.15 




46,300 


2,940.05 




33,900 


2,152.65 




18,500 


1,174.75 


1,262,500 




80,168.75 




29,900 


1,898.65 




150,000 


9,525.00 




33,800 


2,146.30 




28,900 


1,835.15 




17,900 


1,136.65 




55,800 


3,543.30 




55,700 


3,536.95 




25,400 


1,612.90 




27,600 


1,752.60 




17,600 


1,117.60 


300 




19.05 




25,700 


1,631.95 


150 




9.52 


100 


11,600 


742.95 




34,600 


2,197.10 




26,400 


1,676.40 




47,300 


3,003.55 




9,300 


590.55 




34,900 


2,216.15 




17,500 


1,111.25 



182 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Olivo, Jean E. 

0' Lough 1 in, John M. § Joanne R. 

Olsen, Kenneth H. § Elva-Liisa A. 

O'Neill, Edward J. & Teresa 

Onigman, Marc P. £ Maureen 

Order of Saint Anne 

O'Reilly, Joseph J. § Camilla M. 

O'Rourke, Paul K. £ Marilyn J. 

Osborne, Gordon 

Out ten, Henry P. $ Nancy K. 

Owen, Carleton W. 

Owen, Charles J. § Mary Lee 



Paddock, Louis E. $ Ann E. 

Page, Elizabeth J. 

Page, Elliott F. £ Emily R. 

Page, Lot B. § Patricia H. 

Page, Milton S. £ Roberta M. 

Page, Stanley W. § Elisabeth H. 

Paglierani, Laurence A. § Pamela 

Paige, Richard B. $ Elizabeth J. 

Paine, Jason C. 

Paine, Mary C. 

Paino, Dolores M. 

Paino, John F. 

Paino, John F. & Dolores M. 

Palmer, Attelio A. $ Kathryne 

Palmer, Eleanor M. 

Panetta, Frank $ James 

Panetta, Frank £ Theresa J. 

Panetta, James J. § Rosemary D. 

Panetta, Mary N. 

Panetta, Salvatore § Rita 

Pantazelos, Peter G. § Hytho H. 

Pappas, Mrs. Louis T. 

Paquette, Margaret 

Parish, Edward C, Jr. $ Joan DeF. 

Parke, Nathan G., IV, § Ann T. 

Parker, Jackson B. $ Jacqueline S. 

Parla, John J. 

Parsons, W. Chester $ Claire T. 

Pastoriza, James J. $ Ruth B. 

Pattinson, Mary I. 

Patton, Judith A. 

Paul, Louise C. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 1,800 


$ 114.30 




34,400 


2,184.40 




63,100 


4,006.85 




35,800 


2,273.30 




19,000 


1,206.50 




15,500 


984.25 




20,000 


1,270.00 




24,400 


1,549.40 


1,800 


64,300 


4,197.35 




28,300 


1,797.05 




8,700 


552.45 




23,100 


1,466.85 




25,600 


1,625.60 




29,500 


1,873.25 




28,800 


1,828.80 




41,300 


2,622.55 




23,200 


1,473.20 




19,900 


1,263.65 




19,200 


1,219.20 




33,000 


2,095.50 




300 


19.05 




21,800 


1,384.30 




33,300 


2,114.55 




1,600 


101.60 




10,400 


660.40 




21,200 


1,346.20 




28,300 


1,797.05 




3,100 


196.85 




30,000 


1,905.00 




18,900 


1,200.15 




25,900 


1,644.65 




15,700 


996.95 




54,800 


3,479.80 


1,500 




95.25 




2,900 


184.15 




34,000 


2,159.00 




41,100 


2,609.85 




26,300 


1,670.05 




42,600 


2,705.10 




37,300 


2,368.55 




54,300 


3,448.05 




31,100 


1,974.85 




20,200 


1,282.70 




22,700 


1,441.45 



183 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Payne, Roger S. § Katherine B. 

Payne, William T. $ Mary H. 

Pearmain, W. Robert § Claire P. 

Peavy, Leopold, Jr. § Elizabeth J. 

Peck, Mildred E. 

Peirce, Isabel T. 

Peloquin, Roy J. 

Perera, Guido R., Jr. § Joan Hulme 

Perry, A. Wade $ Rachel 

Perry, Richard $ Nancy G. 

Pertzoff, Olga § Est. of Constantin 

Pertzoff, Olga 

Peterson, Frank W. § Mary E. 

Peterson, Mary E. 

Peterson, Wallace F. 

Pettit, Robert L. $ Julie P. 

Phillips, Charlotte T. 

Phinney, Jean R. 

Pianka, Walter E. 5 Ann C. 

Pickett, Robert C. $ Annette M. 

Pickman, Anthony § Alice L. 

Pierce, Charles Eliot £ Dora Redway 

Pike, John A. $ Mary S. 

Pinkerton, William M. § Lucile W. 

Pino, Frank J. £ Muriel E. 

Pippen, George W., Jr. § Judith 

Plant, Paul R. § Madeline Leonard 

Piatt, Anthony C. $ Martha P. 

Plouffe, Francis A. $ Gerene S. 

Plukas, John M. § Kathleen G. 

Podsen, Robert E. $ Doris A. 

Polumbaum, Theodore S. § Nyna 

Porter, James F. § Marjorie F. 

Postel, Sholem § Marie L. 

Poulos, Charles L. 

Poulos, Charles L. § Sophie 

Powers, Francis L., Jr. § Helen E. 

Pratt, Nancy A. 

Preston, Jean W. 

Priest, Anne P. 

Primak, John § Lena 

Puffer, Richard F., Jr. $ Margaret G, 

Pugh, Alexander L., Ill, $ Julia S. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 29,600 


$ 1,879.60 




43,200 


2,743.20 




58,900 


3,740.15 




71,600 


4,546.60 




17,800 


1,130.30 




23,500 


1,492.25 




18,700 


1,187.45 




59,000 


3,746.50 




52,500 


3,333.75 




49,400 


3,136.90 




140,000 


8,890.00 




50,000 


3,175.00 




27,500 


1,746.25 




5,700 


361.95 


250 




15.87 




25,100 


1,593.85 




64,300 


4,083.05 




57,900 


3,676.65 




38,800 


2,463.80 




49,200 


3,124.20 




86,000 


5,461.00 




30,800 


1,955.80 




64,300 


4,083.05 




30,900 


1,962.15 




20,100 


1,276.35 




17,200 


1,092.20 




31,700 


2,012.95 




30,500 


1,936.75 




25,100 


1,593.85 




38,600 


2,451.10 




53,300 


3,384.55 




36,300 


2,305.05 




31,100 


1,974.85 




21,400 


1,358.90 




30,500 


1,936.75 




30,800 


1,955.80 




15,400 


977.90 




2,500 


158.75 




103,500 


6,572.25 




38,400 


2,438.40 




37,900 


2,406.65 




43,700 


2,774.95 




28,800 


1,828.80 



Quarton, Gardner § Frances 



11,400 



723.90 



184 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Radasch, Donald § Margaret R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. 

Ragan, Ralph R. $ Ruth M. 

Raja, Roy M. $ Ellen A. 

Raker, Anne M. 

Raker, Morris $ Anne M. 

Rand, Est. of Lucy Kimball 

Rand, William M. § Priscilla W. 

Rando, Thomas 

Ranney, Donald D. $ Patricia A. 

Rapperport, Eugene J. § Lucy H. 

Rappoli, Arthur E. $ Dorothy H. 

Rasco, Austin £ Diane L. 

Rawson, Edward B. § Nancy B. 

Reece, Richard C. $ Susan W. 

Reed, Abijah $ Susan P. 

Reid, Cynthia J. 

Reservoir Nursing Home, Inc. 

Resnick, Charles H. § Marie J. 

Rhedom Realty Corporation 

Ricci, Louis, Fred § Charles 

Rice, James F., Jr. $ Barbara A. 

Richardson, Frederick C. 

Riley, Allston § Marion H. 

Risch, Martin D. 

Ritchie, James R. 

Ritsher, John A. $ Cynthia W. 

Rizzo, William J., Jr. $ Jane L. 

Robbins, Roland W. § Geraldine 

Robbins, Bonita N. 

Roberts, Paul 0., Jr. § Martha Jean 

Roberts, Richard I. $ Shirley M. 

Robey, A. Alexander £ Harriet S. 

Robinson, Dora A. 

Roehr, George L. § Marcia A. 

Rogers, Alfred P. $ Louise E. 

Rogers, Alfred P. & George E., Trs. 

Rogers, David E. $ Susan B. 

Rogers, Harriet J. 

Rogers, Mabelle, Winifred § Evelyn 

Roger son, Henry S. § Grace S. 

Rolfe, Edward § Stephanie 

Rollins, J. Leslie 

Rollins, James L., Jr. § Norma 

Rood, Jane 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 23,700 


$ 1,504.95 


2,900 


184.15 


28,500 


1,809.75 


29,100 


1,847.85 


25 


1.58 


47,900 


3,041.65 


63,000 


4,000.50 


37,000 


2,349.50 


55,600 


3,530.60 


27,700 


1,758.95 


28,500 


1,809.75 


29,700 


1,885.95 


30,200 


1,917.70 


34,400 


2,184.40 


38,400 


2,438.40 


30,100 


1,911.35 


28,600 


1,816.10 


100 


6.35 


46,900 


2,978.15 


42,800 


2,717.80 


16,200 


1,028.70 


19,900 


1,263.65 


29,700 


1,885.95 


5,200 


330.20 


24,900 


1,581.15 


5,500 


349.25 


64,900 


4,121.15 


16,200 


1,028.70 


18,200 


1,155.70 


150 


9.52 


56,500 


3,587.75 


47,600 


3,022.60 


57,100 


3,625.85 


16,000 


1,016.00 


78,600 


4,991.10 


41,000 


2,603.50 


16,000 


1,016.00 


3,800 


241.30 


29,600 


1,879.60 


38,500 


2,444.75 


21,500 


1,365.25 


35,800 


2,273.30 


4,300 


273.05 


31,400 


1,993.90 


20,600 


1,308.10 



185 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Rooney, Edward D. $ Elizabeth M. 

Rooney, Stuart A. $ Anne E. 

Rosane, Richard C. § Marjorie B. 

Rose, James S, Glenys W. 

Rosen, Joseph § Pearl S. 

Rosen, Paul £ Annette 

Rosenblum, John W. $ Carolyn J. 

Rosenwald, Harold § Betty Booth 

Ross, Paul F. $ Rita M. 

Ross, William C. § Marian L. 

Rossiter, Selina G. 

Rossoni, John P. $ Paola M. 

Rossoni, Paola M. 

Row, Ronald V. 

Row, Ronald V. § Jane E. 

Rowe, Lawrence L. $ Mildred M. 

Rowe, Standi sh S. 

Roy, Nancy C. 

Roy, Shirley I. 

Rubissow, George John 

Rudnick, Mitchell K. $ Rosalie A. 

Rugo, Henry J. § Faith W. 

Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln 

Russell, James D. & Marguerite M. 

Russell, Marie Hamilton 

Russell, Warren J. § Gail S. 

Russell, William B. $ Anne H. 

Russes, Richard P. $ Mary D. 

Ruyle, Sheila B. 



Ryan, 


Alice E. 




Ryan, 


Frank A. 




Ryan, 


Helen E. 




Ryan, 


Helen § Est. of James 


J. 


Ryan, 


William H. £ Mary B., 


Trs. 


Ryan, 


William F. $ Helen M. 




Ryer, 


Russell E. § Margaret 


C. 



Sabbag, Arthur $ Evelyn J. 
Salmon, Walter J. $ Marjorie B. 
Sandy Pond Trust 
Sartor i, Louis R. 
Sartori, Louis R. $ Ruth M. 
Satterfield, Charles N. & Anne P. 
Savage, Orrin T. 5 Helen A. 
Sawtell, Clement C. 5 Adelaide I. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 17,500 


$ 1,111.25 


28,000 


1,778.00 


33,700 


2,139.95 


26,300 


1,670.05 


45,900 


2,914.65 


21,900 


1,390.65 


21,400 


1,358.90 


55,500 


3,524.25 


50,000 


3,175.00 


33,100 


2,101.85 


31,900 


2,025.65 


51,200 


3,251.20 


21,500 


1,365.25 


50 


3.17 


35,300 


2,241.55 


5,600 


355.60 


54,700 


3,473.45 


16,500 


1,047.75 


14,300 


908.05 


28,100 


1,784.35 


45,200 


2,870.20 


48,000 


3,048.00 


26,300 


1,670.05 


23,800 


1,511.30 


41,300 


2,622.55 


20,700 


1,314.45 


67,300 


4,273.55 


19,300 


1,225.55 


20,900 


1,327.15 


24,700 


1,568.45 


13,900 


882.65 


14,100 


895.35 


21,300 


1,352.55 


84,600 


5,372.10 


38,500 


2,444.75 


28,000 


1,778.00 


18,100 


1,149.35 


40,300 


2,559.05 


85,000 


5,397.50 


600 


38.10 


38,400 


2,438.40 


41,800 


2,654.30 


'27,900 


1,771.65 


35,100 


2,228.85 



186 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Sayre, Woodrow W. § Edith W. 

Schaal, Albert A. § Zelpha M. 

Schatzberg, Alan F. § Nancy S. 

Schechter, Joel B., Trustee 

Scheff, Benson H. § Betty Jane 

Scheuer, Harry 

Schildbach, Muriel 

Schliemann, Peter C. $ Diane Page 

Schmidek, Henry H. & Mary L. 

Scholz, Mary A. 

Schumacher, John 

Schwann, William $ Aire-Maija 

Schwartz, Judah L. $ Ellen A. 

Scott, Bruce R. 

Scott, Bruce R. § Anne H. 

Scott, Eleanor B. 

Seaver, John D. 

Seaver, John D. § Millicent 

Sedgwick, Harold Bend 

Seeckts, E. William 

Seeckts, Ehlert W. 

Seeckts, E. William $ Eleanor R. 

Seeckts, E. William $ Eleanor R. ( 

Stout, Caroline W. 
Seeley, George W. Susan A. 
Selfridge, Oliver G. 
Selland, James Olav § Maija 
Semerjian, Evan Y. § Barbara N. 
Senders, John W. & Virginia L. 
Seville, Alfred R. & Joan E. 
Sexton, Maurice J. £ Martha S. 
Shambaugh, Joan D. 
Shamsai, Javid 
Shansky, David 5 Nettie 
Shapiro, David $ Esther 
Shapiro, L. Dennis § Susan R. 
Sharpe, John G. § Jeanne B. 
Shea, William J. § Margaret T. 
Sheer, Richard B. £ Sara Jane 
Sheldon, Mary W. 
Shepard, Gardner D. & Mary Macy 
Shepherd, Henr^ L. , III § Diana R. 
Shevenell, John P., Jr. & Lucy F. 
Shuman, Mark D. § Lena M. 
Silverstein, Fred P. $ Mary J. 
Simms, Margaret J. 
Simonds, Anthony J. 



400 



150 



100 



5,100 
400 
33,800 
76,700 
37,900 
32,900 
27,300 
28,900 
36,100 
50,000 
100 
40,100 
32,800 

60,900 
24,400 

41,800 
35,900 

28,300 
50,900 

800 
22,000 
28,300 
16,900 
40,400 
43,200 
30,900 
18,800 
26,300 
5,300 
4,300 
40,700 
50,200 
51,200 
21,100 
87,500 
23,600 
45,500 
16,500 
33,300 
38,200 
16,700 
18,300 
18,800 



323. 

25. 
2,146. 
4,870. 
2,406. 
2,089. 
1,733. 
1,835. 
2,292. 
3,175 
6. 
2,546. 
2,082. 

25. 
3,867. 
1,549. 
9. 
2,654. 
2,279. 
6. 
1,797. 
3,232. 

50. 
1,397. 
1,797. 
1,073. 
2,565. 
2,743. 
1,962. 
1,193. 
1,670. 

336. 

273. 
2,584. 
3,187. 
3,251. 
1,339. 
5,556. 
1,498. 
2,889. 
1,047. 
2,114. 
2,425. 
1,060. 
1,162. 
1,193. 



85 
40 
30 
45 
.65 
.15 
.55 
.15 
.35 
.00 
.35 
.35 
.80 
.40 
.15 
.40 
.52 
.30 
.65 
.35 
.05 
.15 

80 

00 
05 
15 
40 
20 
15 
80 
05 
55 
05 
45 
70 
20 
85 
25 
60 
25 
75 
55 
70 
45 
05 
80 



187 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 



Lillian M. 
Barbara B. 
& Hope J. 
2nd, £ Elizabeth M. 



Simonds, Lena J. 

Simourian, John § 

Sisson, John H. § 

Skinner, Louis T. 

Slayter, Henry S. . 

Slavin, Gerald D. 

Smith, Alan B. $ Marjorie B. 

Smith, Arthur D. $ Jean C. 

Smith, Carl D. £ Florence C. 

Smith, Converse B. § Nellie L. 

Smith, Eleanor W. 

Smith, Harold Dean § Elizabeth H. 

Smith, John E., Trustee 

Smith, Peter S. $ Linda J. 

Smith, Sumner 

Smith, Steven 

Smith, Theodore Reynolds § Vicki 

Smith, William J. $ Barbara J. 

Smulowicz, Bronislaw § Sawera 

Smyth, Robert R. $ Adella C. 

Snelling, Charles A. 

Snelling, Howard £ Elizabeth J. 

Snelling, Jessica 

Snelling, John R. 



Snelling, John R. § 
Snelling, Norman J. 



Jacquelyn H. 
£ Carolyn R. 



Snider, Greta W. 

Society for the Preservation of 

New England Antiquities 
Solar, Barry $ Judith M. 
Solomon, Arthur P. $ Marilyn N. 
Spencer, Henry W. § Marguerite G. 
Spindler, James W. § Mary B. 
Spock, Michael $ Judith W. 
Spooner, Frederick C. & Sarah W. 
Spooner, Lily T. 

Spreadbury, Peter E. § Roberta I. 
Squibb, Mildred G. 
Squire, James R. § Barbara L. 
Stam, Allan C, Jr. £ Kathleen 
Standish, Myles, Jr. $ Hester T. 
Stankard, Charles E., Jr. $ Jean C. 
Stanley, Francis E. § Suzanne R. 
Stanzler, Alan L. $ Margaret 
Stason, William B. $ Susan B. 
Stathos, Charles A. § Margaret M. 



150 



$ 1,900 
42,500 
48,400 

113,000 
25,400 
18,900 
44,500 
30,500 
22,500 
48,500 
61,800 
26,800 
16,900 
100 

100,800 

18,800 
21,600 
32,000 
32,300 
17,200 
20,600 
43,100 
24,900 
33,400 
25,500 
7,100 

19,200 
49,100 
29,900 
53,000 
38,100 
29,100 
17,000 
20,400 
44,000 
9,900 
53,500 
53,700 
29,600 
40,000 
43,900 
30,400 
53,400 
55,500 



120.65 
2,698.75 
3,073.40 
7,175.50 
1,612.90 
1,200.15 
2,825.75 
1,936.75 
1,428.75 
3,079.75 
3,924.30 
1,701.80 
1,073.15 
6.35 
6,400.80 
9.52 
1,193.80 
1,371.60 
2,032.00 
2,051.05 
1,092.20 
1,308.10 
2,736.85 
1,581.15 
2,120.90 
1,619.25 

450.85 

1,219.20 
3,117.85 
1,898.65 
3,365.50 
2,419.35 
1,847.85 
1,079.50 
1,295.40 
2,794.00 
628.65 
3,397.25 
3,409.95 
1,879.60 
2,540.00 
2,787.65 
1,930.40 
3,390.90 
3,524.25 



188 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Stebbins, Herbert A., Jr. § Patricia R. 

Steczynski, John M. £ Jennepher T. M. 

Steele's Auto Body Repair, Inc. 

Steinhilper, Frank A. $ Anne C. 

Stevens, Edmund, Jr. § Shari R. 

Stevenson, Howard H. § Sarah W. 

Stevenson, John P. £ Patricia A. 

Stewart, Francis J., Jr. § Ruth L. 

Stratford Realty Co., Inc. 

Street, Earle B. $ Janet H. 

Striker, William W. $ Marjorie B. 

Sturgis, Alanson H., Jr. § Anne H. 

Sugar, Peter C. $ Elizabeth R. 

Sullivan, Gladys G. 

Sussman, Joseph § Henri-Ann 

Sutherland, Robert L. $ Ann F. 

Sutton, Emmett A. $ Barbara L. 

Swan , Edmund 

Swan, Edmund & Eleanor G. 

Swanson Pontiac, Inc. 

Swartz, Eli $ Jeanette U. 

Sweeney, Carl F. 

Sweeney, Carl F., Jr. 5 Alice P. 

Swift, Phyllis C. 

Swift, William N. $ Phyllis C. 

Sykes, David F. § Margaret P. 

Sylvia, Lawrence M. 



Tarky, Vincent T. 

Tarky, William J., Jr. 

Taschioglou, Kemon P. § Rhoda K 

Tat lock, Richard $ Jane F. 

Taunton-Rigby, Roger £ Alison 

Taylor, Edward S. 

Taylor, Frederick B. & Lex H. 

Taylor, W. Royce § Dorothy V. 

Teabo, Prince C. $ Elizabeth T. 

Tead, Eleanor K. 

Telling, Irving § Jane Cushman 

Tenneco, Inc. 

Terrell, John H. f T Mary H. 

Tetreault, Anne Gertrude 

Tetreault, Claire F. 

Tew, John B. 

Thiessen, Arthur E. $ Laura 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 21,600 


$ 1,371.60 




19,900 


1,263.65 


200 


38,000 


2,425.70 




51,400 


3,263.90 




44,500 


2,825.75 




82,800 


5,257.80 




36,900 


2,343.15 




29,600 


1,879.60 




16,100 


1,022.35 




41,800 


2,654.30 




20,100 


1,276.35 




22,700 


1,441.45 




23,400 


1,485.90 




17,000 


1,079.50 




47,500 


3,016.25 




30,900 


1,962.15 




28,800 


1,828.80 


250 




15.87 




25,100 


1,593.85 


1,500 




95.25 




17,500 


1,111.25 


150 




9.52 




40,500 


2,571.75 


250 




15.87 




35,900 


2,279.65 




29,500 


1,873.25 




27,300 


1,733.55 




80,400 


5,105.40 




6,000 


381.00 




36,100 


2,292.35 




36,000 


2,286.00 




19,900 


1,263.65 




47,100 


2,990.85 




33,800 


2,146.30 




35,700 


2,266.95 




17,100 


1,085.85 




28,000 


1,778.00 




36,300 


2,305.05 


235,000 


1,000 


14,986.00 




19,200 


1,219.20 




16,300 


1,035.05 




33,700 


2,139.95 




66,400 


4,216.40 




54,700 


3,473.45 



189 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Thomas, George W., Jr. £ Jane C. 

Thomas, Peter A. $ Muriel M. 

Thompson, Donald J. 

Thompson, G. Brooks, Jr. £ Arlene 

Thompson, Lawrence E. £ Dorothy A. 

Thomson, Anne Pearmain 

Three S Realty Trust 

Tinder, Glenn § Gloria 

Tingey, William H. , Jr. § Ruth V. 

Tingley, Frederick M. $ Dilla G. 

Titus, William A. 

Todd, C. Lee, Jr., Eveleth R., David 

5 John 
Todd, Conrad H. 
Todd, Harriet B. 
Toksoz, M. Nafi £ Helena 
Toler, Louise C. 
Tong, Pin § Siang Wen Chao 
Torode, Herbert L. § Lorraine S. 
Torri, Edward F. § Myra M. 
Torti, Maurice L., Jr. & Nancy H. 
Touborg, Jens N. F. & Margaret B. 
Toy, Albert 
Tracey, Elizabeth M. 
Tracey, Robert J. 
Tracey, Robert J. § Caroline J. 
Tracey' s Service Station, Inc. 
Travers, Paul § Bernice 
Trevelyan, Eoin W. U. Ann 
Troisi, Ferdinand L. § Mary G. 
Tunnel 1, Raymond W. $ Suzanne D. 
Turner, Charles F. § Winifred A. 
Turner, James R. d, Mildred B. 
Turner, Vernon D. § Merrylees K. 
Tyler, Ethel A. 
Tyler, Heirs of Watson 
Tyler, Ralph S. § Cheryl Lee 



Ullrich, Robert C. $ Sonia 
Umbrello, Carmel V. 
Umbrello, Francis § Virginia 
U. S. Dynamics Realty Trust 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 17,400 


$ 1,104.90 




27,800 


1,765.30 




48,900 


3,105.15 




25,500 


1,619.25 




47,100 


2,990.85 




19,200 


1,219.20 




87,700 


5,568.95 




38,900 


2,470.15 




38,500 


2,444.75 




24,000 


1,524.00 




13,200 


838.20 




20,300 


1,289.05 




24,600 


1,562.10 


150 




9.52 




6,400 


406.40 




20,600 


1,308.10 




23,500 


1,492.25 




18,200 


1,155.70 




29,400 


1,866.90 




31,900 


2,025.65 




126,400 


8,026.40 


450 




28.57 




27,200 


1,727.20 




32,200 


2,044.70 




54,900 


3,486.15 


850 




53.97 




37,900 


2,406.65 




32,700 


2,076.45 




13,700 


869.95 




36,400 


2,311.40 




15,400 


977.90 




25,900 


1,644.65 




31,200 


1,981.20 




10,400 


660.40 




11,100 


704.85 




21,500 


1,365.25 




21,100 


1,339.85 




20,200 


1,282.70 




25,300 


1,606.55 




3,200 


203.20 



190 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Valley Pond Realty Trust 

vanBuren, Harold S., Jr. $ Beatrice H. 

Barrett 
vanLeer, Hans L. 
vanLeer, Hans L. $ Mary K. 
vanLeer, R. Karl 
vanLeer, R. Karl § Rachel D. 
vanLeer, R. Karl, Trustee 
Van Wart, Walter L. § Stephenia 
Venier, Ettore P. § Mary E. 
Vercollone, Edmund S. § Julia 
Vitale, Joseph A. 
Vockel, Virginia 



Wadsworth, Charles Y. 5 Virginia D. 

Waible, Wendell J. $ Florence E. 

Wales, Betty R. 

Wales, R. Langdon § Ruth W. 

Wales, Roger S. $ Patricia R. 

Walker, John F. $ Joan McK. 

Walker, Sidney A. 

Walkey, Frederick P. § Ruth 

Wallwork, Edwin N. $ Janice C. 

Walter, Charlton M. $ Rosly M. 

Walton, Frank E. § Julie 

Wang, An § Lorraine C. 

Warburg, Jonathan F. § Andrea W. 

Ward, Howard H. § Eleanor D. 



Ward, Jane L. 
Ward, Walter B. 
Ward, Walter B. 
Warner, Charles 
Warner 
Warner 



§ Sophie E. 
Jr. § Marie L. 

D. K. $ Patricia R. 
Estate of Henrietta S. 
John Burton § Barbara K. 



Watts Realty Corporation 
Waugh, John S. 
Weathers, Audrey S. 
Webster, David § Winifred W. 
Weckstein, Richard $ Muriel 
Weibel, Eugene A. 5 Wilma 
Weiss, Alfred D. $ Anne K. 
Welch, Vernon F. § Leatrice June 
Weller, Maria F. 
Wells, George & Katherine W. 
Wenger, Jeffrey J. § Alice H. 



Aggregate Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of Value of 


Real and 


Personal Real 


Personal 


Estate Estate 


Estate 


$ 3,300 


$ 209.55 


4,000 


254.00 


2,300 


146.05 


52,200 


3,314.70 


250 


15.87 


25,100 


1,593.85 


43,900 


2,787.65 


20,000 


1,270.00 


61,900 


3,930.65 


23,300 


1,479.55 


28,000 


1,778.00 


17,800 


1,130.30 


54,800 


3,479.80 


27,900 


1,771.65 


35,300 


2,241.55 


37,800 


2,400.30 


24,100 


1,530.35 


42,000 


2,667.00 


41,700 


2,647.95 


38,300 


2,432.05 


27,700 


1,758.95 


48,300 


3,067.05 


17,400 


1,104.90 


90,600 


5,753.10 


6,000 


381.00 


67,700 


4,298.95 


21,300 


1,352.55 


18,700 


1,187.45 


16,600 


1,054.10 


66,400 


4,216.40 


48,300 


3,067.05 


35,100 


2,228.85 


3,900 


247.65 


41,800 


2,654.30 


72,500 


4,603.75 


54,100 


3,435.35 


41,300 


2,622.55 


6,400 


406.40 


50,800 


3,225.80 


17,500 


1,111.25 


40,400 


2,565.40 


45,600 


2,895.60 


4,200 


266.70 



191 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Wengren, Margaret L. 
Westcott, Vernon C. § Mary Alice 
Whalen, William B. $ Mary E. 
What ley, Robert Boyd $ Kay A. 
Wheeler, Jeanie Noyes 
White, John R. S Gina R. 
White, Katharine S. $ John W. 
White, Robert E. $ Marion J. 
Whitman, Lawrence W. £ Joanne S. 
Whitman, Ross $ Virginia R. 
Wilbor, John S. § Dorothy B. 
Wiley, G. Arnold § Helen P. 
Wilfert, Fred J. 5 Eleanor M. 
Willemin, Julian V. § Jane A. 
Williams, Edwin L., Jr. $ Ruth D. 
Williams, Gregory P. § Janis L. 
Williams, William G. $ Jane C. 
Williamson, Elizabeth R. 
Willmann, Werner S. § Margaret M. 
Wilson, Donald H. & Cheryl L. 
Wilson, Eleanor L. 
Wilson, Mary Ann 
Wilson, Robert A. $ Judith A. 
Winchell, Gordon D. 
Winchell, Gordon D. $ Enid M. 
Winchell, Gordon D. § Love, 

Dorothy W. , Trustees 
Winchell, Gordon D. & Keevil, 

Charles S., Jr. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. 
Winchell, Guilbert S. $ Amy Jane 
Winship, Lee 

Winship, Lee C. & Joyce L. 
Winship, Thomas 

Winship, Thomas $ Elizabeth C. 
Winthrop, John 5 Barzun, Roger, Trs. 
Witherby, Thomas H. £, Marianne J. A. 
Withey, Edward L. $ Barbara H. 
Wofford, John G. 
Wofford, John G. $ Joan W. 
Wollmar, Dick J. $ Mary Lou 
Woo, Way Dong $ Emily T. 
Wood, George A., Jr. $ Nancy S. 
Wood, Hilve V. $ Est. of 0. Chester 
Wood, Ralph V., Jr. S Virginia S. 
Wood, Robert C. § Margaret B. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 70,200 


$ 4,457.70 




22,400 


1,422.40 




16,200 


1,028.70 




20,400 


1,295.40 




5,400 


342.90 




48,100 


3,054.35 




59,000 


3,746.50 




28,500 


1,809.75 




42,000 


2,667.00 




65,700 


4,171.95 




31,500 


2,000.25 




14,000 


889.00 




21,600 


1,371.60 




22,100 


1,403.35 




32,500 


2,063.75 




3,800 


241.30 




23,100 


1,466.85 




15,500 


984.25 




28,700 


1,822.45 




2,900 


184.15 




28,900 


1,835.15 




19,000 


1,206.50 




9,500 


603.25 


4,250 


3,100 


466.72 




61,500 


3,905.25 




17,300 


1,098.55 




46,600 


2,959.10 


450 




28.57 




21,600 


1,371.60 


275 




17.46 




29,600 


1,879.60 


300 




19.05 




61,500 


3,905.25 




53,000 


3,365.50 




60,000 


3,810.00 




26,300 


1,670.05 


100 




6.35 




33,300 


2,114.55 




25,900 


1,644.65 




53,200 


3,378.20 




25,900 


1,644.65 




19,000 


1,206.50 




5,400 


342.90 




45,700 


2,901.95 



192 



VALUATION LIST, JULY 1, 1975 



Wood, Robert M. $ June W. 
Woodington, W. Gordon § Mary L. 
Work, Frederic C. T. 5 Marilyn N. L. 
Worsham, Jack L. § Charlotte A. 
Worthington, Thomas K. $ Elizabeth C, 
Wright, Malor 

Wright, Malor $ Ruth Vaughn 
Wright, Shirley B. 
Wu, Pei-Rin § Susan 



Yagjian, Jacob § Inez 
Yavne, Raphael 0. § Sarah 
Yeuell, Kay M. § Suzanne R. 
Yore, George P. $ Kathleen 
Yos, Jerrold M. & Ann B. 
Young, David B. $ Cora S. 
Young, Est. of Edward L. 
Young, Lee A. § Jane C. 
Young, Lucy J. 



Zevin, Robert B. £ Anne H. 
Zimmerman, Herbert E. § Pearl S, 
Zogwyn, Peter H. , Jr. 
Zuelke, Laurence W. $ Nancy J. 



Aggregate 


Aggregate 


Tax on 


Value of 


Value of 


Real and 


Personal 


Real 


Personal 


Estate 


Estate 


Estate 




$ 37,700 


$ 2,393.95 




29,800 


1,892.30 




45,100 


2,863.85 




40,300 


2,559.05 




25,700 


1,631.95 


335 




21.27 




29,000 


1,841.50 




21,500 


1,365.25 




32,100 


2,038.35 




2,000 


127.00 




22,900 


1,454.15 




38,300 


2,432.05 




15,000 


952.50 




25,900 


1,644.65 




17,500 


1,111.25 




21,300 


1,352.55 




35,200 


2,235.20 




34,800 


2,209.80 




39,800 


2,527.30 




200 


12.70 


150 




9.52 




19,500 


1,238.25 



193 



COMMISSIONERS OF TRUST FUNDS 

Archer desCognets 
William B. Russell 
Richard F. Schroeder 



DeCORDOVA SCHOOL EQUIPMENT FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1975 $ 72.77 

Interest income in 1975 1,206.11 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 7.32 

Bonds sold, proceeds 1,000.00 

$ 2,286.20 

Deduct 

Safe deposit box rent $ 3.00 

Paid to Town of Lincoln, 1975 net income 1,203.11 
1000 American Tel. § Tel. 8 5/8% 2/1/07 978.75 

2,184.86 

Cash balance at December 31, 1975 $ 101.34 

Cash and Securities at December 31, 1975 

First National Bank of Boston $ 101.34 

Cambridge Savings Bank 397.99 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 1,553.76 

-3,000 Int'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 3,010.55 

-2,000 U. S. Treasury 3 1/2% 11/15/80 1,950.47 

-3,000 Southern Bell Tel. 4% 10/1/83 3,017.18 

-1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 1,000.00 

-2,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 1,912.50 

-1,000 Pacific Tel. § Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 2/15/88 1,005.90 

-2,000 Gen'l Telephone Co. of Calif. 4 1/8% 3/1/88 2,009.20 

-1,000 Pacific Gas § Electric Co. 5% 6/1/89 1,001.42 

-1,000 Southern Calif. Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/10/90 1,002.69 

-4,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 3,960.00 

-2,000 Southern New England Tel. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 2,003.98 

-1,000 American Tel. $ Tel. 8 5/8% 2/1/07 978.75 

$24,905.73 



194 



BEMIS LECTURE FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1975 

Interest income received in 1975 - from savings banks 

Gift of Lincoln Historical Society 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 



$ 1,252.69 

1,515.27 

200.00 

9.40 

$ 2,977.36 



Payments per order of Trustees 
Charles D. Childs 
Benjamin Cox 
Bernard Bailyn 
William Morris Hunt 
Other lecture assistance 
Printing $ postage 

Safe deposit box rent 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 



Cash balance at December 31, 1975 



$ 300.00 
500.00 
350.00 
350.00 
128.06 
304.22 
1,932.28 
3.00 
191.85 



2,127.13 
$ 850.23 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1975 



4/1/85 
5/1/86 
1/8% 10/1/86 



First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

Provident Institution for Savings 

-3,000 American Tel. $ Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 

-3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 

-1,000 Virginia Electric £ Power Co. 4 

-2,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 1/2% 1/1/87 

-3,000 Western Mass. Electric Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/87 

-1,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 6.40% 12/11/87 

-1,000 Idaho Power Co. 4 3/4% 11/15/87 

-1,000 Alabama Power Co. 3 7/8% 1/1/88 

-3,000 Pacific Tel. § Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 

-1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

-3,000 New England Power Co. 4 5/8% 11/1/91 

-3,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 

-3,000 Atchison Topeka § Santa Fe RR gen'l mortgage 4% 1995 



Accumulated income 
General Principal 



$ 850.23 
625.42 
3,701.03 
3,012.37 
2,913.75 
1,013.95 
2,000.00 
3,000.00 
956.25 
1,006.36 
1,000.00 
3,056.58 
1,002.69 
3,027.37 
2,970.00 
3,000.00 

$ 33,136.00 

977.08 
32,158.92 

$33,136.00 



195 



ABBIE J. STEARNS FUND FOR THE SILENT POOR 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1975 
Interest income in 1975 
Gift for current expenses 

Withdrawn from savings 

Less bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Grants to or on behalf of certain people 

Cash balance at December 31, 1975 



$101.43 
34.99 



61.43 
450.00 



11.07 



136.42 
400.00 
547.49 



511.43 
36.06 



First National Bank of Boston 

Boston Five Cents Savings Bank 

-1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 



$ 36.06 

887.56 

1,000.00 

$1,923.62 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



698.57 
1,225.05 

$ 1,923.62 



GRAMMAR SCHOOL FUND 
Cash Account 



Interest income received in 1975 
Paid to Town of Lincoln 



65.29 
65.29 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1975 



Middlesex Institution for Savings 
Cambridge Savings Bank 



$ 722.00 
495.52 

$1,217.52 



196 



JOHN H. PIERCE LEGACY 



Cash Account 



Cash balance January 1, 1975 

Income received in 1975 - 

interest, net $ 8,315.27 

Elsie Pierce Trust 2,985.63 

Codman Trust 800.00 

Fees for use of Pierce House 5,180.00 

Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Securities sold 

TOTAL RECEIPTS 

Payments per order of Selectmen: 

Medical assistance to needy townspeople 

Blood pressure clinic 

Well-Child Clinic 

Pierce House expenses: 

Repairs § maintenance $ 898.11 

Supplies 521.63 

Caretaker compensation 3,195.00 

Gas (heating) 1,936.26 

Other utilities 743.78 

Mowing, Pierce Park grounds 

Rubbish removal 

Miscellaneous 

Savings bank interest allowed to accumulate 

Safe deposit box rent 

Bonds purchased 

TOTAL DISBURSEMENTS 

Cash balance December 31. 1975 



$ 2,057.00 



17,280.90 

6.60 

10,000.00 

$29,344.50 



1,664.50 

50.00 

450.00 



7,294.78 

2,359.98 

97.95 

190.90 

550.36 

20.00 

9,503.50 

$ 22,181.97 

$ 7,162.53 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1975 

Restricted as to Principal: 

First National Bank of Boston (To be transferred to Savings) $ 496.50 

Union Warren Savings Bank 378.30 

10,000 Internat'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/2% 2/1/82 9,975.00 

21,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 20,081.25 

10,000 Federal Nat»l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 9,900.00 

10,000 Southern California Edison Co. 7 1/8% 1/15/94 10,000.00 

10,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 9,975.00 

5,000 Southern N. E. Telephone 5 3/4% 11/1/96 5,000.00 

10,000 Florida Power $ Light Co. 6% 12/1/96 10,000.00 

10,000 Pacific Gas & Electric Co. 4 5/8% 6/1/97 10,000.00 

10,000 American Tel. § Tel. 4 3/4% 6/1/98 10,000.00 

10,000 Duke Power Co. 7% 2/1/99 10,000.00 

10,000 Southwestern Bell Telephone 8 1/4% 3/1/14 9,503.50 

$115,309.55 



197 



Unrestricted: 

First National Bank of Boston $ 6,666.03 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 4,497.58 

Provident Institution for Savings 6,108.32 

5,000 Internat'l Bank for Reconstruction 4 1/4% 1/15/79 4,904.56 

5,000 American Telephone S Telegraph 4 3/8% 4/1/85 4,856.00 

1,000 Virginia Electric 4 1/8% 10/1/86 1,014.05 

3,000 Niagara Mohawk Power Co. 3 5/8% 5/1/86 2,913.75 

4,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 6.40% 12/11/87 3,825.00 

5,000 Pacific Tel. d, Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 8/15/88 5,066.02 

2,000 Federal Nat'l Mortgage 7.05% 6/10/92 1,980.00 

$157,140.86 



DONALD GORDON RECREATION FUND 



Cash Account 



January 1, 1975 balance 

1975 interest income 

Interest applied to amortize bond purchase premiums 

Withdrawn from savings 

Deduct - Advertising lost pass book $ 4.00 

- Safe deposit box rent 3.00 

- Bank interest allowed to accumulate 31.16 



704.55 

270.14 

1.52 

4.00 



38.16 



942.05 






Cash and Securities at December 31, 1975 

First National Bank of Boston 

Middlesex Institution for Savings 

-1,000 Southern Bell Telephone 4% 10/1/83 

-1,000 American Tel. $ Tel. Co. 4 3/8% 4/1/85 

-1,000 Virginia Electric S Power Co. 4 1/8% 10/1/86 

-1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

-1,000 Fed'l Nat'l Mortgage Assoc. 7.05% 6/10/92 



Accumulated income 
Principal 



$ 942.05 
602.12 
1,000.00 
1,000.00 
1,013.95 
1,002.69 
990.00 

$ 6,550.81 



940.53 
5,610.28 

$ 6,550.81 



198 



LIBRARY TRUST FUNDS 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1975 
Income received in 1975: 

Codman Fund 

Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth Fund 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 

George Russell Fund 

Abbie J. Stearns Library Fund 

George G. Tarbell Fund 

George G. & Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 

C. Edgar $ Elizabeth S. Wheeler Fund 

Lincoln Library Fund 

Additional donation for DeNormandie Room 
Withdrawn from savings 



Payments : 

Safe deposit box rent 

Custance Brothers (redecorating 

Tarbell Room) 
Purchase of books, DeNormandie Room 
Purchase of books, general Library 
Jean Tenander, Librarian 
Deposited in savings bank 
Bank interest allowed to accumulate 
Payment for advertising lost pass book 

Cash balance at December 31, 1975 



485.01 



$ 



33.81 

35.56 

35.57 

8.48 

63.63 

31.43 

130.57 

151.98 

870.54 

82.30 

64.00 



3.00 

2,604.00 
198.20 
857.28 
63.63 
700.00 
408.71 
8.00 



1,507.87 

200.00 

2,862.00 

$5,054.58 



4,842.82 
$ 211.76 



Codman Fund 



Income on 
Deposit 



Mdsx. Inst, for Savings $ 126.78 



Mary Jane Murray Farnsworth 
Fund 

Boston 5{ Svgs. Bank 

Alice Downing Hart Floyd Fund 
Boston 5$ Svgs. Bank 

Hugh Anthony Gaskill Fund 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 



186.20 
186.91 



Principal 
$ 474.59 

500.00 
500.00 
158.89 



Total 
$ 601.37 

686.20 
686.91 
158.89 



199 



Income on 
Deposit Principal Total 

John H. Pierce Library Fund 
100 So. N. E. Tel. 5 3/4%, 

1996 $ $ 1,000.00 $ 1,000.00 

Mdsx. Inst, for Savings - 114.57 114.57 

George Russell Fund 

Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 137.57 415.74 553.31 

Abbie J. Stearns Fund 
100 Fed'l Nat'l Mtge. 



6.40% 12/11/87 


956.25 


956.25 


Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 193.55 


986.06 


1,179.61 


George G. Tarbell Fund 






1000 So. N. E. Tel. 5 3/4%, 






1996 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1000 So. Bell Tel. 4% 1983 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1000 West'n Mass. Electric Co. 






4 3/8% 1987 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


Union Warren Svgs. Bank 69.08 


138.38 


207.46 


George G. $ Eleanor F. Tarbell Fund 






10,000 Duquesne Light Co. 






7% 11/1/99 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


Boston 5* Svgs. Bank 2,324.38 


75.00 


2,399.38 


C. Edgar £ Elizabeth S. 






Wheeler Fund 







1000 Fed'l Nat'l Mtge. 
Assoc. 6.40% 1987 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 

Lincoln Library Fund 
1000 So. New Eng. Tel. 

5 3/4% 1996 
Mdsx. Inst, for Savings 

First Nat'l Bank of Boston 

- fund income 

- Cannon donations 

- Mackenzie donations 

- Eaton donations 



79.13 


956.25 
273.52 


956.25 
352.65 


70.05 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 
70.05 


(170.39) 


312.77 
50.00 
19.38 

$20,931.40 


(170.39) 

312.77 

50.00 

19.38 


$3,203.26 


$24,134.66 





200 



LINCOLN SCHOLARSHIP FUND 



Cash Account 



Cash balance at January 1, 1975 
Income received in 1975 - Dividends 



$ 1,024. 
618, 



Interest 

Interest credited 

in error 1974 (5.05) 

General appeal (6 donors) 108.00 

Donation, Memory of 

A. Flint 518.00 

Donation, Memory of 

D. Donaldson 1,051.00 

Brooks School gradua- 
tion party 17.39 

Old Town Hall Corp. 2,000.00 



Interest applied to amortize bond premiums 
Securities sold 
Withdrawn from savings 



$ 3,543.35 



5,332.30 

1.21 

139.72 

1,000 .00 

$10,016.58 



Payments per order of Trustees: 
Balance of 1974-75 grants: 

Jean Marie Murphy, Northeastern University 
Elizabeth Algeo, Framingham State 
Mary Evelyn Toler, Forsyth Dental School 
Christine Casner, L-S Reg. High 

(Special Program) 
Robert Gajewski, Fairleigh-Dickinson 
Jacqueline Smith, St. Anselm College 
Louise Striker, Ithaca College 
First portion of 1975-76 grants: 
Rebecca Doughty, Univ. of Mass. 
Benjamin Ward, M. I. T. 
Louise Striker, Ithaca College 

Safe deposit box rent 

Deposited in savings bank 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 



Cash balance at December 31, 1975 



— 2,500.00 



1,425.00 

3.00 

3,000.00 

618.17 



7,546.17 
$ 2,470.41 



Cash and Securities at December 31, 1975 



First National Bank of Boston 

Provident Institution for Savings 

1,000 Pacific Gas $ Electric Co. 5% 6/1/69 

1,000 Southern California Edison Co. 4 1/2% 2/15/90 

5,000 Ohio Power Co. 5% 1/1/96 

6,000 Southern New England Telephone Co. 5 3/4% 11/1/96 

40 shs. Exxon Corp. 

100 shs. Northern Indiana Public Service Co. 



$ 2,470.41 
12,743.25 
1,001.42 
1,002.69 
4,987.50 
6,012.11 
3,016.85 
2,973.63 

$34,207.86 



201 



Reserve for balance of 1975-76 grants $ 1,500.00 

Robert L. DeNormandie Fund 1,000.00 

Lincoln 4-H Horse Club Fund 1,770.00 

Ernest P. Neumann Memorial Fund 5,005.00 

General Fund 24,932.86 

$34,207.86 



JANE HAMILTON POOR SCHOLARSHIP FUND 

Cash Account 

Cash balance at January 1, 1975 $ 19.64 

Interest income in 1975 117.74 

$ 137.38 

Deduct: 

Bank interest allowed to accumulate 117.74 



Cash balance at December 31, 1975 $ 19.64 



Bank Deposits at December 31, 1975 

First National Bank of Boston $ 19.64 

Concord Cooperative Bank 2,271.82 

$ 2,291.46 



Accumulated income $ 1,056.46 

Principal 1,235.00 

$ 2,291.46 



202 



incoln, Massachusetts 




WANCIAL 

iECTION & 

VARRANT for the 

976 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 



TOWN OF LINCOLN 



REPORT 

of the 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 



1975 



Cover Design - 



We are grateful to 
Minute Man Publications 
for permission to use 
portions of staff 
photographs in the 
cover design 



REPORT OF THE FINANCE COMMITTEE 



1976-1977 Budget 

In November, the Finance Committee advised Town Boards that it had 
again established a guideline recommendation that the increase of overall 
expenses not exceed 8%. This guideline was based on several considera- 
tions including: 

An expectation of continued inflation, but somewhat below the 
recent two-digit rate; 

The fact of certain built-in cost increases in the budget, 
particularly in fuel and electricity and in the teachers' salary 
contract previously negotiated; 

The need to compensate Town employees reasonably for the ser- 
vices performed and to provide them with continued incentive in an 
inflationary period; 

Further, we felt that, given the financial problems of State 
and local government, high unemployment, and declining real income, 
it would be extremely short sighted to impose a tax rate increase of 
more than 5% on the citizens of the Town. Our belief was that a 
budget increase of 8% would translate into a tax rate increase be- 
low this amount. 

During January, 1976, it became apparent that economists' revised pro- 
jections of inflation for 1976 made our 8% guideline high and accordingly 
we requested a number of Town Boards to try to make additional cuts in their 
budgets with the hope that we could achieve an overall budget increase not 
in excess of 7%. Reference to Table 1 will show that many categories of 
Town Government have, in fact, been able to achieve this. Our budget com- 
ments below discuss why others have not, and why our comparable increase 
is 7.3%. 

Two factors stand out when one considers Lincoln's 1976-77 budget and 
prospective tax rate. One, is the extent to which these are influenced 
by factors over which the Town has relatively little control; the second is 
the extent to which new programs and new services become annual built-in 
costs increasing steadily from year to year because such programs and ser- 
vices almost invariably have a high labor content. 

As to the former, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in calendar 1975 
had the largest single tax increase in its history, necessitated by the sud- 
den, if belated, realization that continued failure to cover expenses would 
mean that it would be unable to issue new debt. However, even with this 
tax increase, we expect the Commonwealth will be passing less money on to 
Lincoln by way of reimbursements for present programs and for the new ser- 
vices it continues to require the cities and towns to undertake. 

Also, during the year, it became apparent that Massachusetts was, of 
all the states in the union, among those with the most poorly funded state 





H- I- 1 


H 




3 <C 


o 


w r - 


-vj 


r» 


n- co 


>— un 


CO 


co 3 


lO 1 




r+ Cl 


-J -J 




(D 


Ov Q\ 


n 


"3 




o 


Co C 


-J*3 


^ 


3 |-J 


-J »-J 


*3 


CL O 


O 


pa 


=r 


cr to 


4 


►+> co 


C >-J 


pa 


(D l/l 


Cl Co 


cr 


Cl o> 


TO 3 


i—" 


CD 


a> w 


a> 


-i O* 


pt 




Co O 


•• 3 


00 


>- 3 


O 


C 


CL 


r+ 


CL 


>-+) VI 




TO 


C 


H- 


a> 


3 ^3 


3 


rf 


Cl Co 


O 





— 


C 


O 


3 


w 


O 


c 




►i 


CO 


< 


u 


(D 


7) 






H> H> 


c 


H- 



o n ?o tr ?a ?o m 

Q (6 Q H- (D Q •— ' 

CT 3 O O* TO TO Q 

rt 0) hj hj H - m- 3 

rf (0 CO o o a 

C/> O CO 4 3 3 3 



o H- 
I TO (/) 
H 3- O 



CO O 
O O 

o 



ct> o 



I 3? CD 

<T> C (D 

co cr 3 

n- H- HJ 



P CD 

Co 0> < 

3 rt (5 

£ i 

H- 3 



N)K) t— ' C* 00 K> * W 

-fc»Cn00 CaI K) CO C* -C* ID W N) N) 

OOOi— 'l/lK)WK>O--JONj00C*W 

OCOWOW^WO*000(OWWW 



AU3 O N) hvJkjh OWOO 

ONlOOtONlMOJiUlO^UOi-' 
O^UlOslOOOOUlO»ON)UiO»sl 
OODOOVli— -vlJi.oOi-'OOUl 



K> W Cn l/i l/i W on t— ' O O W O C* 
OOOOOWO\K)C»o>— ' in WO 



00C*W'~nv£>a\O-J~-JOO'-n<0 



pension programs -- with potential liabilities estimated between five and 
eight billion dollars. In this connection, a quick computation of the 
Town's contribution to the Middlesex County Pension Fund shows that it is 
up 23.4% on top of an increase of 31.6% only last year. (Exhibit 3, line 
item 900). 

Chapter 766 is a notable example of a state mandated program which has 
entailed substantial additional costs to both the elementary and high schools 
without additional state funding. Chapter 766 involves evaluating those 
children having "special needs" and providing whatever program is necessary 
to meet those needs, either within the framework of the regular school sys- 
tem or in special schools. Because the state reimburses cities and towns 
for their Chapter 766 costs out of funds previously available under Chapter 
70 (general education) and because Chapter 70 funds have not been increased 
to reflect the added costs of Chapter 766, there have been fewer state funds 
available to reimburse towns for general education. 

Nevertheless, Lincoln has fared relatively well under the circumstances 
due to the excellent work of the elementary school administration in first 
identifying their special education costs several years ago. These costs 
are fully reimbursable by the State at their 1974 level, while under the 
Chapter 70 reimbursement formula Lincoln is reimbursed for only a small per- 
centage of its general education expenditures; thus the result has been that 
Lincoln has received a greater reimbursement of its total education expense 
than it otherwise might have obtained. 



Budget Comments: 

Table 2 illustrates that over the past ten years there have been few 
significant changes in the percentage of our total budget allocated to the 
various categories of the budget. We have picked out for discussion budget 
items which contain significant dollar or percentage increases. Our com- 
ments are not necessarily directed at the Board or Department whose budget 
we are discussing; in fact, they are usually well aware of the causes of the 
cost pressures on their budgets and are making a continuing effort to con- 
trol such costs. 

However, the reasons for these cost pressures are frequently not appar- 
ent to the Town and by noting some of them we believe we can increase the 
general understanding of our budget and the town's ability to determine what 
are the services and programs for which it wishes to expend its' tax dollars, 

General Government 



Conservation Commission: 

The principal reason General Government is over our guideline is 
due to conservation commission expense. Much of the projected 39% in- 
crease in this budget item is for engineering, legal and related costs the 
Commission expects to incur in carrying out its plans for dealing with the 
impact of one hundred per cent valuation on Lincoln's open land. The need 
for the part-time salaries included in the account may be reduced if feder- 
al legislation continues to make CETA employees available. 



TABLE 2 
BUDGET ALLOCATION 



1976-77 




Government 2.9% 3.0% 

Other Library 



1975-76 



High ■ 
/Schools 
17.4% 




Gen. *" ^^^-L-W^'Un class. 
^ 0V ; 3.0% 2.9% 4.9% 
5,0% Other Library 



1966 



/ Elementary 
School 

43.6% / High 
Schools 
1% 




Gen. ^^^^/- J 4;A Unclass> 3 4% 
Govt. Other Llbrar X 
4.1% 3.7% 2.3% 



Public Works 

A major cause of the 10.4% increase in public works is the sub- 
stantially larger amount of materials to be purchased for road work to be 
undertaken in the coming year. A number of CETA employees, paid for with 
federal government funds, will be available to do the work this year, and 
may not be available in the future if the CETA program is not continued. 

Library 

After a 19.2% increase last year, the library budget is up an 
additional 9.4% this year, although there is no additional staff. Pro- 
posed salary increases, new books, records, etc., and the estimated cost 
of properly cataloguing the material in the new historical records room are 
responsible for the increase. 

Recreation 

The $4,550.00 increase in this account is due to the addition of 
a youth worker to establish a youth program for the junior high age group 
in Lincoln. With its' youth program, the Town will assume a role previous- 
ly, but no longer, filled by public and privately organized social programs, 
at a time when there seems to be strong indication for such need. 

Unclassified 

The principal causes of the startling 28.6% increase in the un- 
classified account are payments to be made for pension and medical benefits. 

Middlesex County Pension Fund: 

This fund, like other Pension Funds run by the Commonwealth, is 
minimally funded. Thus, the cost of paying benefits to retired employees 
will continue to climb as more and more town employees retire. (The fund 
covers all town employees except teachers.) The Town is investigating 
establishing its own pension fund, as some other municipalities have done, 
and funding it over a period of time. Nevertheless, this is a rapidly 
increasing cost which is difficult to control in that we cannot reasonably 
reduce benefits to retired employees or the promised retirement benefits to 
present employees; in fact, we must expect such benefits to increase over 
the years. 

Employee Hospital and Insurance Fund: 

In fiscal 1974-75 there was a sizeable increase in this account as 
the town switched from a major medical to a master medical plan, an increase 
in benefits which we supported. Next year the Blue Cross rates for this 
coverage will increase 33% on top of an 18% increase in the current year. 

The medical and insurance costs for both school and town employees 
are included in this account; of the total, slightly in excess of 75% is 
allocable to school personnel; the remainder is allocable to all other town 
employees. 



Schools 

Vo-Tech: 

There is a 6.9% increase in Lincoln's share of this budget; much 
less than the 52% increase last year. The increase primarily reflects the 
addition of a third class at Minuteman. Commencing September, 1977, there 
will be freshman through senior classes and, hopefully, the facilities will 
be fully utilized, thus reducing the per pupil, if not the total, cost. 
Even so, because of the high cost of vocational and technical education pro- 
grams, the per pupil cost will probably remain above that at Lincoln-Sudbury. 

Linco ln-Sudbury : 

The Regional school committee proposed another "stand-still" budget 
and their total budget is up approximately 6%. However, because the rela- 
tive number of Lincoln children to Sudbury children increased this year, the 
impact on Lincoln's budget is reflected in a 6.7% increase. 

Lincoln-Sudbury has ceased to grow and, in fact, enrollment next 
year should be 5% lower and future annual percentage reductions may well 
accelerate. As we have learned in the Lincoln elementary schools, this 
does not mean that the costs of the school will decrease. Necessarily, 
the buildings still have to be lighted, heated and cleaned, even with a 
smaller population. More importantly, within a year it is expected that 
the entire teaching staff will be tenured and there will be few, if any, 
vacancies. Thus, the average cost of the staff can be expected to increase 
substantially each year as the present staff obtains step and cost of living 
increases and no new staff comes in at the bottom of the pay scale to lower 
the average. 

In November, 1975, two public hearings were held on three alterna- 
tive plans developed under the National Institute of Education (NIE) study 
grant. While no conclusions were reached, there was valuable discussion 
of the financial impact of various types of school programs. We look for- 
ward to further consideration of these and other alternatives as the cost 
pressures increase in the system, while student population decreases. 

Elementary Schools: 

The elementary schools expect only a slight decrease in student 
population next fall due to the estimated admission of about 26 new students 
as the result of the opening of Lincoln Woods. However, while the size 
of the entering classes appears to be levelling off, the fact remains that 
the graduating classes are now, and will continue for a few years to be, al- 
most twice the size of the entering classes. When this bulge is gone, our 
Lincoln campus will be substantially smaller. 

The same cost pressures noted for the high school are present at 
the elementary level; i.e., tenured staff whose cost is not averaged down 
by the arrival of new teachers in an expanding system. Combined with 
annual step and cost of living pay raises, this means an increasingly senior 
and expensive staff. 



School systems pay scales, like those in most organizations, are 
designed to reward increased experience and the acceptance of increased res- 
ponsibility. But what happens when you have a tenured staff and there is 
only so much experience required and so much responsibility to be assumed? 

To some extent these matters were recognized in the two-year con- 
tract negotiated last spring by the School Committee. This contract in- 
cluded step increases plus cost of living percentage increases which scale 
down as one ascends the salary scale. The added cost to the town of the 
combined step and cost of living salary increases is 8.7% this year and 
will be 8.4% in 1976-7. 

In last year's annual town report, the School Committee listed 
eight "overriding" questions which it felt must be addressed. Of these, 
two have significant financial implications: 

"How individualized can education become and still be a 
a commodity the public can afford?" 

"Can we find alternative means of providing educational 
services which will slow down the annual rate of in- 
crease in the cost of services, without sacrificing the 
quality of services?" 

For some time we have been urging the School Committee to make such 
an investigation. In 1959, when the Schools last had a student population 
similar to that projected for 1976-7, there were a total of 38 teachers. 
Next year there will be 37.4 classroom teachers, 22.9 specialists, and the 
equivalent of 21 full-time paid aides (the actual number of aides is con- 
siderably in excess of 21; however, most work less than the maximum 28 hours 
permitted) . 

In 1971, the schools began to substantially increase the number of 
aides. The then Superintendent speculated in his report that providing 
teachers with aides might permit an increase in class size at little cost, 
since aides are paid substantially less than teachers. Since that time, 
because of the decrease in available school jobs, it has been easy to obtain 
highly qualified aides at low cost and the schools have done so. However, 
the ratio of pupils to classroom teachers has remained essentially unchanged, 

There is provision in the school budget for salary increases for 
aides averaging approximately 12%, and such increases do not appear unreason- 
able for the services they perform. However, while acknowledging the 
qualifications of many aides and their lower pay scale, we believe it is im- 
portant to realize that the cost to the town from the steadily increased use 
of teacher aides is now budgeted at $82,500 for next year (of which $13,200 
is attributable to special education). 



What of the Future 

In looking to the future, we must constantly keep in mind the degree to 
which the cost of government is affected by factors essentially outside of 
our control. As already noted the budget is substantially influenced by 
external factors; but so are our revenues and reimbursements. State defi- 
cits may well mean reduced local aid funds for cities and towns. County, 
MBTA and state assessments appear certain to increase this year. No sub- 
stitute has yet been enacted by the legislature to replace Chapter 90 high- 
way reimbursements, which have been discontinued. The Sudbury 100% valua- 
tion tax case appears to promise substantial changes in tax assessment 
practices. 

Nevertheless, as noted in the previous section, there are many expenses 
which are within our control. 

When we institute new programs, we must be mindful of their on-going 
costs -- bike paths and conservation land must be maintained, greater fire 
and police security invariably mean increased manpower. Added personnel 
requires additional supervision, supportive services and fringe benefits. 

We frequently talk of the town's priorities. If the town adds all pro- 
grams that all groups request, we bring into question whether many of our 
present population can continue to afford to live here, and diversity of 
population is one of our stated priorities. 

Therefore, we feel it is important that the citizens inform Town offic- 
ials of their priorities, not only what new or expanded services they be- 
lieve the town should be providing, but also what services they believe 
should not continue to be supported at their present levels. 



1976-1977 Tax Rate 

The full impact of the question of priorities will face the town at the 
March Town Meeting. (See Estimated 1976-1977 Tax Rate - Exhibit 1.) At 
present, of the increase of slightly over $6.00 in the tax rate we are 
forecasting, roughly $2.00 is contributed by increases in the budget and 
$4.00 is contributed by warrant articles, which this year amount to over 
$200,000 by our estimate. This figure contrasts with $66,000 last year 
and a general level in recent years which has fluctuated between $70,000 and 
$100,000. 

We still feel that a tax rate increase below 5% should be an important 
priority of the town and that to reach levels of 9%, as our present spending 
package would, will impose considerable hardship on many people in the town, 
as well as compete with the town's objective of maintaining the economic di- 
versity of its population. 

In recommending that the town exercise a difficult degree of discretion 
when it makes its will felt at Town Meeting, we believe that opportunities 
to make more than a marginal short run impact on the tax rate through re- 
ductions in the budget are quite limited - unless the town wishes to radi- 

8 



cally alter the content of its services to citizens. The capital expendi- 
ture program represented by the warrant articles, on the other hand, this 
year is an area in which we can exercise substantial influence toward 
achieving reasonable levels of town expenditures. 

Under the circumstances we urge each citizen to think carefully about: 

what is absolutely necessary versus unnecessary 

what is desirable but postponable 

whether it is essential that certain needs are met "now" 

whether or not today's commitments carry with them implica- 
tions of substantially greater expenditure rates in the 
future. 



Arthur L. Coburn, III 

John Ehrenfeld 

Beth Sutherland 

William G. Williams, Jr. 

William C. Munroe, Jr., Chairman 

THE LINCOLN FINANCE COMMITTEE 



EXHIBIT 1 



ESTIMATED 1976-77 TAX RATE 



Town budget (Warrant Article 5) 

Other warrant articles 

Total warrant appropriations 

Funds available to offset against appropriations: 

1) Free cash - 7/1/75 

2) Metco funds 

3) Federal revenue sharing funds 

4) Receipts in lieu of taxes 

5) Other 

Total warrant articles to be paid by taxation 

County, MBTA and State assessments: 

1) County 

2) MBTA 

3) State 

Total expenditures to be raised by taxes 

Other sources of funds: 

1) State and local aid funds 

2) Motor vehicle excise tax 

3) Others (net) 

Total to be raised by taxation 
Estimated property valuation (1/1/76) 
Estimated tax rate (per $1,000 assessed value) 



$ 4,330,000 

210,000 

$ 4,540,000 



$ 300,000 
65,000 
52,000 
30,000 
20,000 



$ 240,000 
90,000 
40,000 



$ 560,000 

210,000 

60,000 



467.000 



$ 4,073,000 



370,000 



$ 4,443,000 



830,000 



$ 3,613,000 



$52,000,000 



$ 69.40 



10 



r— cr> 





n: 




VltSQ 




ursz 




mO< 




1— on 




Olllfl 


CV! 


.— < i— r» 




h- • 


»-- 


<: cr> «^- 




h— lo r^. 


a. 


oo cti tn 



a: q: a; 

uj <c <t 



a: _j 

a o 
z to 





t>c </> 




C +-> 


5 


•H ^ 


<u 


to CO 


2 


3 4-i 




O to 




= 




C 




o 








••-> 




co 








3 




D, 




o 




CU 




X 




> 




c <u 




2 -! 




o 




r- X 




co 




E- 


+j 




S- 


t/: i—i 





+-> re 


a 


c ex, 




CO mH 


co 


£S 


3 


03 t-i 


C 


C U 


C 


a. 


< 










T3 X) 




c o 




W Q 




u c 




CO 5 




<u o 




>~ H 




<u 




■M 




CO 




OS 




X 




CO 




E- 


i— i 




co 


0) 


C 


3 





^ - 


■y. 


_ co 


M 


S-, > 


0) 


CD 


a. 


cx-p 




o <u 


u.7 


^ tfl 




cu "> 


i — i 


<u 


cd 


(T, 


<u 


V) 


~ 


< 




fc 




cO 




a 




>- 



u 

O 00 
LO \£> 
TJ- CD 

to to 



u a: a, 

o c c 

c LO u 

r-- r-^ a 



u-: H 
c vD 
u-. r- 
ci a-. 



c 


vC 


to 


KJ 


K1 


r-- 


■>a- 


a-. 


KJ 


t 


LO 


en 



to to 
^- o 

.— I LO 



ococcccccooccoccoo 

OOOOOOCOOC OOOOOCOO 
CCOCCCLOCCCCCCOCCOO 

vc>— if-HCOLO'^-vovo^rvo— > w. to r-- r-^ r- o 

i— li-Hi— li— li~li— Ir-Hr-tfMCNCNCNrOCN 



o 


O 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


a 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o o 


O 


o 


c 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


O CM 


CM 


a 


o 


c 


c 


o 


LO 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


c 


■- 1 


c 


c 


C CM 


EN 


o 


en 


OO 


CO 


to' 


,_, 


CN 


,_ 


lo 


•^3- 


h« 


\C 


vO 


c 


CM 


CM T3- 


T 


1— 1 


i— i 


CN 


a. 


LO 


^3" 


lo 


CN 


\C 


vO 


f- 


CN 


O 


00 


r- 


[^ LO 


i— I 


CN 


"-• 


o 


vC 


\C 


vC 


LO 


io 


to 


to 


en 


■"I, 


^- 


a-, 


00 


O lO 


to 



U~> LT> LD 



CM 


CO 


vO 


o 


LO 


o 


o» 


c 


o 


o 


00 


o 


UO 


o 


c 


LO 


o 


c 




o> 


o 


■*!- 


oc 


o 


vO 




c% 


o 


•<3- 


o 


to 


o 


o 


to 


c> 


CM 


-d- 


CM 


CM 


o\ 


CM 


o 


00 


"- 1 


o 


•"- 1 


00 


to 


r-. 


r» 


o 


KJ 


r-~ 


o 


-a- 


00 


■* 


to 


I-. 


m 


a> 


CN 


00 


CM 


CM 


r^ 


** 


to 


l/l 


to 


to 


o 


CM 


to 


CM 


r-{ 


(Tt 


LO 


CM 


•—1 


o 


Ol 


to 


vO 


vD 


^J 


■^r 


00 




to 


CTl 


^r 


o 


00 


-^ 


to 


lO 


00 


LO 


LO 


to 


TT 



Oi o% to 



c 


■f. 


CD 


3 


(.J 


ifl 




= 




:- 


CO 


u 


u 




Q) 


c 


TD 


5 


O 


O 


u. 


H 



O 3 



■H CT) 
tO -h 



o 


,_, 


CM 


to 


■<^ 


LO 


vO 


r- 


00 


— 


c 


vO 


vO 


vO 


vO 


vO 


vC 


vO 


vD 


£ 


~. 


en 


O 


t7> 


o» 


a. 


<n 


C7> 


en 


cn 



C71 CT> CJ> 



11 



LO 

C r- 
o r-. 

+j c 
03 to 
TJ \ 
C vO 
(D I 
E vO 

e r- 

o \ 



c 
O 


o 

o 


o o 
o o 


o 

o 


o 

c 
to 


o 

c 


o o 
o o 

C\) LO 


o 
o 

rO 






~ 


CM 



o o 
o a, 



O LO o 
O Tj- o 

r~- <y> o 



U"> 




UJ 


r- 


_l Q 




CX> 


<C O 






O i—i 




Q 


CO CC 




•>c 


i— i LU 




O i—i 


U_ D_ 




CO CC 






UJ 


<£> _l 


c 


LU D_ 


f^ <C 


o 


2T 


CT> C_) 


•H 


3D —I 


.— CO 


■t-J 


-3 <C 


1 •—< 


o3 


<_> 


LO U_ 


•H 


3: co 


r^ 


?H 


CD .— • 


o r^ 


ex 


W3U. 


i— r-^ 


o 


LU C 


en 


(H 


a: a: vo 


LU i — 


ct, 


id 3i r-s. 


3= 1 


eu, 


1— 1— CT: 


1— vo 


< 




r-^ 




Q *d" 1 


U_ CTi 




T ZNLDOr- 




LU CT> r^ 






Q_ r— CTi 


CO LU 




i X i— 


31 3= 




3 LU •> 


H- h- 




h i — LU 


■z. 


lo 


; u_ hi 


o cc 


(u 


< o >- 1— 


s: o 


5-i 


-: _i 


Li_ 


3 


LUDCC 


v£> 


■M 


_l -D O 


CO 


•H 


3D U_ 


(— 2: 


T) 


q s: 


CO c 


c 


ucw 


a: >-h 


LD 


laH 


•-H |— 


a 


<_) Ll_ O 


U- <C 


X 


CO •-. 


Q 


w 


Q h- 


lu 2: 




O <=C 


3T LU 






i— z: 




CC CC 


2: 




LU Q_ 


cc c 




Q_ O C C_> 




CC 


U_ LU 




LU D_ 


CC 




31 o_ 


CO 




h- <: 


LU T3 

CC C 




cc 


3D (C 




c 


1— 







LO 


(/) 


fs 


0) 


\ 


h 




3 


to 


«J 


"V. 


•H 


CM 


T3 




c 


I 


<u 


LO 


cr- 


X 


\ 


w 


rt 




f>» 



LP. 


O, r-H 

to o 






to 

o 


to a, 
vo cr. 
r- en 








CM 



o o o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o o 


o 


o o o c 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o o 


o 
















o o o o 


o 


LO 


o o 


o 


coo 


o 


o c c o 


o 


(N 


O 00 


00 


o to o 


to 


tO tO (N LO 


to 


1— 1 


oo to 


1— < 


O LO o 


LO 
















I—I 


c\> 




00 vO 


lO 


lo \o to 


■« 








rr ,-i 


\0 


«* 


LO 



O O CO 


00 


o 


O vO 


vO 


LO to 00 


vC 


O O vO 


vO 


o 


O .-I 


I—I 


cc to Tt 


vC 


... 1 














O O vO I 


v£> 


LO 


O 00 


00 


LO to ^J- 


to 


O O CN 


(N 


-vi- 


o o 


en 


i-H O l-H 


CM 


to to o 


vO 




tO Tt 


h» 


vD N <? 


oc 
















1—1 


I—I 




en co 


00 


LO vO (N 


"* 








•rt 


LO 


"« 


LO 











vD 
























> 
















V 


rt 
















00 


fH 
















c 


•(-> 
















tt 












h 






a 


<L) 










<u 






X 


+-» 










+J 


£ 




UJ 


03 










o 






•»-) 


<u 




L0 








B 


u 


L0 




L0 


a) 




<D 


L0 




L0 




s 


<D 


rt 


0) 


«J 


G 


o 


<D 


<L> 


a> 


<U di 


•iH 


c 


L0 1+-I 


•M 


L0 


•H 


•H 


L0 


•H 


L0 oo 


Di 


5h 


o 


c o 


•H 


c 


<+-( 


5h 


c 


h 


C 03 


UJ 


a 


00 


a) 


1 


<D 


VW 


03 


<u 


03 


0) +j 


> 


1— 1 


5h 


Ci,4-> 


Dh 


o 




D. 


e 


^H 


Ph to 


o 


03 


<D 


X 3 


o 


X 




CC 


X 


o 


03 


X O 


CJ 





CO 


a 


UJ o 


u 


LU 


03 


CO 


UJ 


(4-1 


CO 


uu a. 


J 


£ 








0) 










<4-l 






< 


+-> 


• 




. . 


o 


• 


o 


. 


. 


O 


• 


• • 


DC 


o 


CM 


to 


rj- LO 


c 


o 


c 


to 


*f 




LO 


vO t~^ 


UJ 


(U 








rt 




03 






c 






z 


f-H 








c 




c 






5 






UJ 


<i> 








•H 




•H 






O 






CJ 


co 








EL, 




LL. 






H 







12 



CO 




c 


r-~ 


o 


r- 




*"■«* 


+-> 


o 


cd 


tO 


TJ 


*»«, 


c 


vO 


o 


i 


i 


vC 


E 


tv 


o 


"»s. 


U 




09 


*v. 


OS 


h« 



c 
o 


O 

o 


o 
o 

OC 


o 
o 






to 


rj 



O LO 
O CM 
LO (N 



O O 
O O 
CM tO 



o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 
















o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


LO 


o 


o o o 


o 


o 


to 


o 


CM 


LO 


(M to CT> 


"* 


00 


I— ( 


to 


1— 1 


















CM 


■^ 


h- 


a; 




CM 
tO 





LO 


M 


f> 


co 


-\ 


h 




3 


M 


fj 


\ 




fM 


T3 




c 


1 


03 


LO 


pur- 


X 




w 


iH 




"»». 




h- 



o 


00 


o 


r» 






o 


LO 


c 


rj 


LO 


to 



O LO 
LO CM 

o 



C \£> 


















O h- 


o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


c 


o o o 


o 




o o 


o 


o o 


o 


o c 


o 


o o o 


o 


£ o 


















rt ro 


o o 


o 


O LO 


LO 


o o 


o 


O C O 1 


o 


•H ^ 


O LO 


LO 


O CM 


CM 


o o 


o 


o o o 


c 


u \o 


o cr> 


o> 


.—1 CM 


to 


Csl to 


LO 


CM LO LO 


OJ 


ex i 


n n 


n 


M 


n 






•v 


* 


O LO 


to cm 


LO 


o 


c 






(Nl 


to 


U r-- 


















cx\ 












< \ 



















CO 


S- 


CD 


"v*. 


u 


c 


3 


to 


4-> 


"«s. 


•H 


o 


-n 


1 


c 


■or 


a> 


t»» 


tx 


*»v 


X 


IH 



O 


LO 


o 


"(fr 






o 


-t 


LO 


CM 


LO 


CM 






C) 


CN 



^ 






O 


10 




tfl 


<u 


o 


CO 




CO 


<D 


M 


C 


CO 


a) 


CD 


CO 


i — i 


ex 


< 


cd 


X 




CO, 


UJ 


4-1 






o 


g 




13 


O 


r—l 


'M 


LO 


LO 



w> ex 





<L> 


X 


CO 


n 


c 


cd 


<u 


i — i 


ex 


cd 


X 


CO 


W 


. 


. 


o 


,— 1 


v£> 


vO 



0} 


U 


L0 


Uj 


CO 




<u 


c 




in 


o 


•H 




4-1 


•H 


i 


CO 


O 


> 


u 




0) 


cd 


cd 


c 


T3 


f-i 


F-h 


o 


CD 


bO 


4J 


•H 


(0 M 


o 


CO, 


■M 


C C 


f-i 


rH 





<D -H 


ex 


M 


O 


CX 4-> 




1) 


i— t 


X o 




Bd 


LU 


UJ > 




. 


. 


. . 




O 


,— | 


CM tO 




r- 


t-- 


r- r-^ 





13 



4-> O 

CO tO 

C v£> 

4) I 

e *> 

o \ 



o c 


o 


o o 


c 






O LO 


LO 


o a> 


o> 


CM i— 1 


to 






vo i-» 


to 




•"■' 



o 


c 


O 


c 


o 


o 








a 


a 


o 


1—1 


in 


o 


^r 


cc 


<o 








1 — 1 


LO 


•*t 


m 






«— • 







o 


c 


c 


o 


o 


o 








c 


o 


m 


c 


LO 


CN 


vC 


m 


r» 








CN 


cc 


LO 


IN 


cm 


CM 


•— ' 







o o 

v£ o 
o to 





LO 


M 


r- 


o 


*>V 


fc 




3 


to 


■i-> 


"V. 


•H 


rj 


— 


— 1 


C 


1 


CD 


LO 


a,i— 


X 


\ 


UJ 






"S 




t^- 



LO oc 


to 


i—l CN 


■*r 


■*t to 


r*» 


LO (Ji 


-* 


LO CM 


00 






CM i— 1 


to 



Ohm 
CN! LO O 
O CM to 



■"d- 


f» 


c 


KJ 


iH 


LO 


^ 


o 


r* 


CM 


vC 


K3 


o 


Ol 


to 








1— 1 


cc 


ro 


LO 


1-1 


M 



to 


C 


to 


CM 






CM 


rj" 


O 


LO 


cc 


<£) 






43 


to 


1-1 





O LO 

< \ 



c 


o c 


C 


o 


o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o o* 


o 


LO 


o 


Tj 1-1 


LO 


t>» 


LO 


CM OC 


o 


1— < 










CM 


v£> v© 


to 


,— 1 


1-1 




1-1 


o 

CM 



o o o 

o o o 

LO CT. vO 



c o 
o o 


C 

o 


O LO 
O CM 

O Tfr 


LO 






LO CM 

■-H CM 


CN 


iH 







LO 


n 


!». 


o 


\ 


to 


o 


3 


to 


»J 


~\. 




\Z 


Tj 


1 


C 


rr 


CD 


r» 


Cu\ 


X 




UJ 


••v. 




f- 



O CM 


CM 


to r- 


c 


i-H CM 


<* 


to 00 


1— ( 


to •-{ 


LO 






LO en 


"* 




1-1 



CM 


ffl 


c 


Ol 


O) 


a 








t 


Ol 


c 


LO 






\£> 


LO 


CN 








r- 


LO 


cc 


*T 


1—1 




•— < 







00 c 


O 


en cr, 


o 






cr> to 


LO 


tO LO 


t>. 


r-- lo 


<o 






r-^ to 


*• 


CD n-t 


CN 



to r~- 

r- o 



•H C 

T3 CD 
O +J 



<u 


s 


M 




L0 


Q> 


fH 


c 


CO 


ed 


o 


• H 




ex, 


3 


4 


X 


Jh 


GO 


UJ 


U 


. 


. 


. 


c 


rH 


N 


o 


c 


O 



c 


■H 


W c 


o 


(H 


C CO 


E 


CO 


CD U 


u 


i— | 


CXT3 


Jh 


rt 


X X 


td 


Cfl 


UJ X 


p, 






o 






Q 


• 


• • 




o 


CM tO 


<D 






S-. 


«-H 


.—1 i—l 



CO 


c 


o 


V 


ex 


Q, 


ad 


X 


s 


UJ 


. 


. 


1 — 1 


cm 


CM 


CM 



14 



1/) 










C r-* 


c 


o o 


o 


o c 


o C-. 


o 


o o 


o 


o o 


•H \ 










■M O 


o 


c o 


o 


o o 


rt to 


o 


CTi O 


en 


00 o 


T3 \ 


r- 


Q> 00 


t-- 


r-- lo 


C vO 










CD 1 




vO .-h 


oc 


to <-< 


E ^c 








CN] 


6 r- 










o \ 








O .-H 








<D \ 








a: r- 











o o 


o o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o o o 


o 


o 


LO C 


o o c* 


o 


LO 


0O LO 


O LO o 


o 


00 


i— 1 LO 


00 LO Tl- 


l/J 


en 










I-- to 


tO O (M 




en 


■— ' 


•— I 




to 





LT. 




r» 


M 


^s. 





1— 1 


V-> 


to 


-i 


~^ 


+J 


rj 


H 


— ' 


C 


ifl 


CD 


r- 


c\ 


X 


, — i 


J-i 


*». 




r-- 



Tf o 

^ c 
o en 



.— I to O O O LO 

HH«*C\C 

'JO 00 H\0 (N 



C v£> 














o r- 


c 


c o 


c 


c c 


c 


o 


•H \ 


c 


c o 


c 


c c 


c 


o 


•M C 




• . 








• 


CO to 


c 


o o 


o 


o* o 


o 


o 


•H \ 


c 


LO O 


LO 


o o 


o 


vO 


*-i vD 


r- 


\C 00 


*t 


O LO 


LO 


o 


& 1 














O LO 




VO iH 


oc 


vO 


«o 


LO 


U r- 












c 


C-\ 












^r 


CX.-I 










< \ 















o c o o o o 

LO LO O LO o o 

rroc M i/! M <t 

lo r-- cm o .-i 





LO 


</> 


tv 


o 




^ 


o 


3 


to 


♦J 


^ 


•H 


s0 


T3 


i 


P3 


-r 


u 


f»- 


P, 




X 


i— i 


a: 


"*> 




r^ 



^r en 


en o c 


o 


oc o 


CM o c 


LT. 


t-- i-H 


o to LO 


,_, 


o c 


00 LO to 


«o 


^r c 


O CM 0C 


^r 








.-1 oc 


to c 




1-1 


1-1 





<L> 


c 


U 


c; 


c 


S-. 


rt 




C 


0) 


o 


TJ 


4-> 


•H 


c 


L0 




|J 


cfl 


3 


s 


O 


. 


. 


LO 


sO 


CM 


CN 



CD 




m 




_ 




L0 




(H 




c 




+-> 


CD 


u 


m 


CD 


C 


ex 


a; 


to 


p< 


c 


X 



2£ 

E- a: 
cj w 

to CL, 

E- O 

O a. 

a: a- 

US 

a; 

O CO 

PL, Z 

c 
co co 

< w 
H ex 
O 







u 


C 


CD 


< 






o 


o 


Oh 


H 








•H 


X 








> 


•M 


CD 


2 






M 


O 




< 






o 


CD 


1 


co 






LO 














.-H U 


u 


U3- 






c 


O CD 


<a 








o 


O O 


o 


S 


LO 




•H 






H 


(1) 


o 


4-> 


CD C(-i 


tw 


J 


rH 


L0 


U 


GOtw 


«4H 


< 


M 


C 


CD 


Cj O 


O 


W 


CI! 


a> 


&.J3 




X 




ex 


(/) 


^ GO 


oc 




cd 


X 


c 


rt O 


o 


a. 


00 


W 


M 


o a 


a 


O 

CJL, 
CO 


o 




CN 


to ^t 


LO 


hJ 


o 


c 


O 


o o 


o 


< 


M 


rs 


CN 


CM CM 


CNI 


O 



15 



10 




c 


r~ 





r-« 


•H 


"^ 


4-> 


O 


rt 


to 


— 


"^ 


C 


>C 


o 


i 


1 







*•>> 


u 




0) 


\ 


a: 


r-~ 



O 


O C 


o o 


o 


o 


o o 


o o 


c 










a 


o o 


CM C 


rj 


oc 


LO O 


lo o 


irt 


r*. 


o o 


LO c 


r j 










Kl 


LO \0 


LO <-< 


vO 


\C 


CN CM 


.-H to 


oc 



J-. to 

+-> CM 



UJ \ 



lo r-- 


C»H 


a-, c 


C 


00 o 


tO tO ^H 


o en 


r- 


oo to 


LO CM \D 


r-H to 


O 


r-- o 


CNN 


O vC 


i_r, 


LO LO 


lo lo ■^r 


.-1 h- 


^r 










(Nl to 


vO -^ 00 


\D <J> 


t— i 


LO 


CM CM 




to 



& I 

O LO 

< \ 



o o 


o 


o c 


c 


O 


C 


o o 


c 


o o 


C 


c 


O 


v£>* O 


o 


o o 


c 


LT, 


,-H* 


r- lo 




o o 


o 




LO 


<?, o 


o 


\D C 


■**■ 


IT. 


LO 














r-~ rr 


NO 


(Nl v£5 


■*? 


CT. 


Q 


i-H i— 1 


to 


(n cm 


•— ' 


tN 


«o 



to r- 

a> \ 

fi o 

3 to 

•M \ 

• H vO 

T3 I 

C T3- 

a> r-~ 

C\ 

X -i 

UJ \ 



vD o 


CM 


CM r-l 


oo to 
to i-- 


.-H C 

,-1 c 

o o 


LO 

LO 


cm cm 
to N 

r-l O 


o r-" 

to to 

00 \0 


h- to 


to 


CM CN 


tO .-! 

— 1 CM 















9 




















V) 














a> 


a> 


c 














u 


tO «-l .-H 


a> 






if) 








c 


C rt ^h 


CL, 






0) 


EU 






a> rt 


0) > -H 


X 






O 


OC 




■M 




o c 


ao <w 


o 


LO 






< 




e 




C 0> 


v> X E 




^ 




> 


[Xh 




0) 




rt +-> 


X 0) 0) to -O 


oo 


uS 


Di 




fH 


J 




£ 




c c 


rt f-i 4-> C 


c 




o 




0) 


(U 




■M 




(D -H 


S uJ X CTJ 


•H 


0) 


S: 




V) 


s 




J-l 




+-> aJ 


J) Mh 


T3 


O 






to 








C(J 




C E 


aa +J O -H 




c 


U 




0) 


- 


U 




a 


a) 




C -H ^H X 




rt 






o 


to 






a> 


<u 


aj ^h 


V) d) 5-i 


3 


C 


J 






c 


J 




Q 


• ^ 


e rt 


^ E us- «-> oj 


CQ 


0) 


CQ 


tu 


> 


CTJ 


CQ 






'~ 


Ih 


fn &, <U -M 




4-> 


3 


Qi 


u 


*H 


3 


W 


10 


Ed 


-a a> 


ffl -H ^ <U -H 


t/J 


c 


CL. 


< 


(0 


o 


Q- 


5»i 


M 


i— i 


c3 C 


ra, 3 o fn c 


.* 


•H 




tu 


CO 


+-> 




Ci 


U 


rt 


o a> 


cr c -m rt 


(h 


aJ 


ae! 


J 




<u 


Qi 


o 


O 


W 


OS U 


Ut/l WW 


O 


2 


o 


UJ 




> 


o 




^ 








S 




UL, 


s 


to 

c 




tL, 


c_> 


o 


. 


. . 


. . . . 


o 


. 


to 


u 


. 


to 




•H 


o 


— 1 CM 


to ^ LO vO 


•H 


o 


nJ 




f-i 


to 


J 


hJ 


r-| 


o 


O O 


o o o o 


pH 


1— 1 


< 


-J 


<u 


o 


< 


CQ 


X> 


to 


to to 


to to to to 


X) 


to 


H 


CQ 


■M 


Tt 


H 


D 


3 








s. 




o 


rD 


(0 




O 


£X 


a. 










H 


Q- 


> 




E- 



16 



<S> 




C 


r~- 


o 


r-s 


•H 




«J 


o 


Cd 


M 


>d 


*s 


c 


\C 


O 


1 


g 


SO 


1 


h* 


C 


"^ 


(J 




cc 


\ 


Qi 


h» 



o 


c 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o o 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


to o 


© LO 


o 


oc 


o 


c 


r- o 


o o 


o 


t«* 


1/1 


oc 


CM o 


\0 LT) 


o 


NO 














LO 




TT O 


00 c 


*■ 


M 


vO 






O p-i 


to 


■<T 






tO ,-H 


to 




OC 






^H 






— 



O LO Cn o o 
(N O O 00 CM 

cm to r^ cn \o 





LT. 




r- 


tfl 


"x. 


« 




f-l 


Kl 


3 


x> 


4-> 


CN 






TS 


i 


C 


LT, 


0) 


r- 


p, 




X 




LU 


>«. 




r^ 



■^f 


LO 


o 


r-< 


l-» 


o 


ix 


o 


o 


cn 


^t 


r»« 


to 


^r 


\D 


LO 


to 


c. 


CM 


cn 


*C 


vO 


r^ 


* 


LO 


t> 


LO 


r» 


i— i 


CM 


LO 


tx 


r— 1 


oc 


r^ 
















00 


t-^ 


o 


O 


1— | 


.— i 


CT) 


LO 


00 

"3- 


ro 


o 




,H 


oc 



00 tO ,-H OC CM 

\o lo vo r^ >— i 



cd to 

■H \ 

(X l 

O LO 



o 


O 


o c 


o 


o 


O 


O 


o 


c 


o o 


a 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


OO O 


c 


tN 


o 


O 


o 


LO 


.-i o 


o 


cn 


c 


»c 


o 


r» 


.-i o 


o 


vD 


a 


LO 
















r- 




vD LO 


oc 


oo 


rj 


t- 


lO 




tO --H 


vC 




to 








CM .-h 


r j 






r~- 






.-H 








rH 



o o c 


c 


a 


O 


o o c 


O 


a 


o 


i— i to to 


h- 


o 


,_, 


OO 00 ^ 


to 


CN 


00 


OO N OO 


LO 


CN 


00 










\£) to LO 


m 


i— i 


vO 


i-H CM 




t-4 


i-l 



u o 
3 to 
4-> \ 
• H vO 

C ■* 

X <-i 



LO 

CM 


CM f- 00 tO O 

\D .-t to cn to 


LO 


to 

v£3 


O 
O 


oo 

LO 


00 CM 00 00 CM 

i vo to r- cn cm 

i cn o •>* cn oo 


V0 

00 
00 


to 

LO 
CM 


o 












LO 
LO 


LO CM CM 00 tO 

cn cn tj- to 

O CM 


oo 

CM 

LO 


cn 


cn 



oc 

cc 


lo r- 

00 CM 


o 

c 


cn 


cn 


oc 


tx Tfr 
LO LO 
CM tO 


CM 

LO 


cn 
to 
CN 


to 

CM 


C 
NO 


cn Tj 


-r 


o 


cn 
cn 















if) if) 






































+-> E 
































(U 0) 
































if) 4-> 
































0) W W 
































O CVl X 






























tfl 


C <f> 


















OJ 












<u 


rt T3 


i— ( 










• 






L0 












u 


C tu U 


o 










u 






C 








OJ 




•H 


O X O 


o 


o 








4-> 






a> 








> 




> 


4-> -H X 


X 


o 








O 






ex, 








cd 




N 


C <4-l 4-> 


o 


xz 














X 








h 




o 


•H O 


co 


u 








•> 






OJ 






c 


-p 




in 


rt «4-i 




CO 








w 












o 








E O JZ 


X 










XI 






u? 






■H 


o 




,— i 


4-> 


r-| 


DC 


JC 


z 






f-l 












4-> 


♦J 


c 


o 


uJ C -H 


o 


>H 


1— 1 


00 


o 






o 






OJ 






if) 


cd 


CCJ 


o 


o 


O 3 


o 




o 


>H 








u 




tfl 


o 


>- 




H 


U 


■(-> 




X 


C -H 


X 




o 


X 


H 






o 




c 


c 


cc 




o 


4-> 


tfl 


^ 


o 


O -M W 


o 


rH 


X 




<c 




V) 


h 




cd 


cd 


< 




o 


to 




u 


tfl 


•H -H E 


CO 


05 


o 


X 


u 






o 




o 


• H 


c 


cc 




X 


■H 


14-1 


2 




4-i if) nl 




c 


CO 


u 


3 




X 


•H 


* 


LT, 


-3 


OJ 


CQ 




o 


c 


o 


?_ 


h 


cvl -H ^ 


JZ 


o 




o 


Q 




U 


M 


ui 


c 





4-> 






CO 


•H 




4J 


o 


^h 3 GO 


be 


>H 


X 


H 


EU 




cd 


cd 


^ 


o 


*J 


c 


J 






E 


*J 


Ifl 


_c 


OJ CT O 


•H 


oc 


bO 


1 






>-i 




o 


PV 


L0 








X 


"3 


5 


c: 


♦J 


tx (J U 


I 


o 


• H 


o 


Qi 




X 


cd 


o 


X 


2 


cd 


cc 


z 


u 


< 




O 


O < CL, 




oc 


X 


> 


o 




•H 


CO 


cc 


w 


U 


SI 


o 


o 


cd 












pH 








LU 




J 












u. 




4-> 












cvl 




x; 






> 
















H 


c 


• 


< 








c 




o 


• 


CO 


Di 


O 












co 


< 


a> 


,_, 




CJ 


to 


tj- r- cn 


o 


a 


<u 


r-t 


-J 


2 


•iH 


a 


pH 


CN 


-z. 


i— • 


—3 


u 


E 


o 


o 


O 


o 


o o o 


•H 




H 




< 




•■j 


cj 


rj 


to 


to 


< 


3 


aj 


LO 


L0 


LO 


LO 


LO LO LO 


DO 


LO 


1 


LO 


H 


CQ 


X 


L0 


LO 


LO 


LO 


LO 


H 


a 



















o 




o 




5 












p 


LU 


u 












Q£ 




> 




H 


J 












H 



17 



o o lo 

LO LO CM O 



c o 

O LO 
CTl CM 



OOOOOOOCOO 
Ot^OC00OC7>OOO 
OCNOOOIOOOOOO 





m 




r- 


M 




o 


, — i 


h 


KJ 


3 


■»» 


■M 


rg 


■H 




■g 


i 


c 


LO 


<u 


r» 


o,\. 


X 




tu 


*>» 




r*. 



h» 


Ol 


■«3- 


CN 






CT. 


c-. 


t-0 


tO 


-3- 


** 








co 



c c 
o r-~ 

O CM 



O LO O tJ 

O 00 O 00 

O >-i O Oi 

o \o o r^ 



o LO 

cx\ 

Q,i-H 

< \ 



o o 
o o 
o> o 



oooocooooo 

OLOOO-rfOOOOO 

om-oocmolooooo 



c > 
o t 

pu- 

X I 



^r 


O 


\D 


■* 


LO 


K] 


LO 


Ol 


f» 


o> 








LO 



oc ooocooo 

OO OOOOOOO 

OO OOOOOOO 

OM lOOO^-tOOO 

0\C I O LO O r-l O \£3 O 

LO OLOOvOOtOO 

(N w o h rg .-h 







M 


U 


M 








9 


o 


o 


2 




01 


U 


*J 


■M 


O 




<l) 




u 


O 






•P 


to- 


c 


CO 


H 




4J 




5h 


U 


< 




•H 


to 


•H 


•H 


W 




i 


o 


O 


CO Q 


0i 




•H 




tf> 


u 




o 


Lh 


£ 


C X 


w 




u 


gd 


+-> 


CO 4-> 


o£ 








3 


CX 3 




2 


c 


co 


O 


X o 


OS 


O 


o 


CO 


>- 


w >~ 


o 




•H 








PL, 


H 


•p 










3 


CO 


• 


• 


• • 


CO 


CO 


o 




CM to 


— : 


qs 


u 


o 


o 


o o 


< 


u 


o 


^D 


sO 


v£5 vO 


H 


w 


CO 








O 


OS 


oc 








H 







UJ 


CO 






UJ 


«J 




s 




C 


M 


u 


oc: 





■M 


c 


eg 


E 


c 


ed 


H 


P 


o 


c 


tu 


M 


E 


o 


i 


td 


Lh 


4-> 


P< 


CO 


c 


u 


e 


■M 


•H 




Q 


C 


rt 


OS 








o 


>> 






u. 


in 








o 






co 


4-> 


o 


CM 


— 


O 


o 


o 


< 


E 


r^ 


r- 


H 


CO 






O 


U 






H 







LO 




















■g 


n 


















x> 


8 


















• 


O 








c/> 










tc 


c 




n 




73 










V) 13 






13 




c 




in 






-a n-i 


c 




C 




o 




X) 






c X 







O 




X 




C T3 






o 






X 








O C 






X) CO 


+-> 


M 






<D 




X rt 






o 


rt 


13 


• 




oo 




i— < 






• -H 


d. 


C 


m 


LO 


rt 




CO 






bc-i 


•H 


O 


"3 


-3 


X 




LO C 






-a o 


O 


X) 




c 


U 


CO 


o o 






-H Ph 


•H 




X 


o 


M 


T3 


a, W5 






X) 


■M 


cx 




X 


3 


c 


^ ^-i 






off 


c 


c 






& 


O 


3 <D 






CO 


cfl 


•H 


o 







X 


QhZ 






o co 




■d 


o 


</5 


T3 










•H U 


X 




X 


rt 


C 





^-1 LH 






t— t -H 


CO 




u 


X 


rt 


M 


.-H o 


tu 




O LW 


«J 


3 


to 


U 




O 


cO 


U 




(X 




X 




H 




cx 


CO 






c 


c 




c 


3 


c 


M 


C LO 


> 




to o 


o 


, — 1 


o 


a, o 


3 


O CO 


Otf 








o 








JX 


X 


LU 


CO 


CO • 


• 


o 


• 


13 


• 




• o 


CO 


o 


*-l -M 


•M 


X 


4J 


C 


♦J 




■M ^ 




•H 


•H C 


c 


u 


C 


a 


C 


— i 


C 3 


H 


> 


U- •-< 




CO 




_j 




< 


i-h a. 


OQ 


fn 


















UJ 


CO 


















o 


CO 






















(N tO 


M- 


LO 


^c 


a^" 


o" 


i— i 


CNJ bO 


z 


•M 


o o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


1— 1 


r- < 


1 — 1 1— 1 


s 


XI 


00 00 


oo 


00 


oo 


oo 


oo 


00 


00 00 


o 


o 



















18 



rt to 

T3 \ 

C VO 

0) I 



c 

o 


o o 
o o 


o 

c 


<N O 

rH O 


o 
to 


c 
tN 


o o 
o rr 

O <-i 


c 

o 
c 


"*J- o 

o o 

0O LO 




Kl 


O TT 


c 


r-t <N 


- 1 



OOOO oooooo 
OOOO oooooo 

CT O O ^N WOM N 



4-> CN 

•H i—l 
13 I 

C LO 

X c-1 
UJ \ 



VO LO 00 


O 


oo rsi to 


\0 






N N 00 


LO 


t-^ o -^ 


cr 


moa 








vO l>- (N 




r^ to <ni 





c \o 






o r- 


o o c o o 


o 


•H \ 


o o o o o 


o 


4-> C 






<x to 


o o o o o 


o 


•H \ 


\£) O O O O 1 1 


LO 


$h \C 


f- O vO O LO I I 


00 


d. 1 




«N 


O LO 


to O r^ o to 


\£5 


U r-~ 


.-H LO 


■<3- 


o*\ 




to 


CX.-I 






< \ 






t^ 







vO 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


o 


o 


oc 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


O 




















r»» 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


r-. 


01 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


c 


o 


cr, 


cc 


o 


<N1 


Osl 


o 


c 


to 


(Nl 




















vO 


to 


CT 


to 




cn 


,— 1 






r-- 


f» 


to 

















LO 


in 


l> 


u 


v^ 


h 


c 


3 


to 




-v 


•H 


«C 


-c 


i 


c 


-i 


<u 


r- 


cx\ 


X 




cu 


v,^ 




r^ 



o o o 
to O \D 

(Nl O O 



O to t}- 

Coot 


oc 


o rfr 

O .-H 


o 
o 


O O TT 

OHTf 

in nh 


00 


O 00 
1 O .-I 
1 CM 


o 
o 

CN 


00 CT \£> 

LO LO tO 


to 


to" 















t/> 




CO 


















"d 




13 


















-C 




c 
o 


















13 




-o 














01 




c 


















-g 


\n 


cd 




c 














c 


13 






<D 














o 


c 






X 










13 




JD 


c 


h 




o 










C 






pfl 


o 




4-> 










rt 








t-J 




•H 












t/) 


O 

o 


13 

c 


•P 


13 


^. 










C 


"0 


CI, 


ed 


i—l 


C 


c 










o 


c 








O 


as 










</} 


o 


t»C 




■z 


_0 


E 








TS 


1— t 


£J 


c 


5h 






T3 


UJ 






o 


0) 









c 


C 


O 


<_> 






3 


z 


i—i 


i 


N 


o 


CD 


u 








C 




o 


+j 


4-J 


X 




> 






•H 


c 


o 




•H 


rH 


o 


c 


ai 






•M 


o 


ex s 


r-l 


o 


4-i 


o 


w 






c 






CT; 


•H 


z 


•H 




co 






o 


4-> 


M 




s 




U. 


4-> 








u 


L0 


c 


c 




c 




(/) 


H 








<u 




o 


c 


o 


c 


<u 


0Q 






* 


u 


E 




o 




a 


Jh 


UJ 






o 


o 


£ 


• 


+^ 


• 


E 


d) 


a 


a 


n3 


o 


4-1 


■r-l 


4-> 


* 


4-J 


-3 


4-> 




UJ 


<U 


•rH 


c 


2 


C 


c 


c 


O 


c 


a: 






> 




UJ 


I— I 


^ 




CJ 




o 


u- 


(4-1 


f-l 
















U-, 






CJ 


















co 


(/) 


171 
















co 


co 


trt 




^r 


L0 


vO 


r^ 


OC 


CT 


o 


j 


^ 


n3 


•M 














CM 


< 




43 


00 


oc 


oc 


00 


oo 


oc 


oo 


H 


u 


o 


o 
















O 


z 


c 


Q 
















H 


r) 


3 



cm 














OJ 














•Oh U (D 














C rt C C W (/) 




<u 










3 4-> rt 5 C 13 




a> 










a, -h s-i o a> Jh 




4-> 










&3 *J &0 




4-J 










C <f> O) X O 




•H 










O O C M <D a» 




i 










•H X -H C ^ 












V) -H • 


o 


o 


c 








C ta X 4-> M C 


o 


u 


c 








4-> 3 4-> 2 


4-< 












a. <u -h xi E o 


«-> 


c 


tfl 








O C -H H 


•H 


b£ O 


U1 








X C E 5-i C 


E 


C -H 


•H 








4-> 03 0) 4-> 5 <4-l 


E 




E 


a 






C 5h 13 t/> O O 


O 


C CJ 


E 


UJ 






3 3 C -h 4-> 


U 


C <C 


O 


i—i 






O (/) -H -o c 




rt 


u 


UL, 






U C tUO 


c 


h a> 




r— 1 






•H uJuJ -H 


o 


CL, > 


1— ( 


co 






X Ifl 4-> 




•r-l 


cd 


co 






(U <D X bo 4-> rt 


4-^ 


■-H 4-> 


u 


< 






W CD 4-J C fn > 


rt 


rt rt 


•H 


J 






<U X M -H O f-i 


M 


C E 


h 


u 






<-< O <L> 4-> D-. <D 


X) 


O U 


o 


z 






-O ^ 3h C 0) (/i 


u 


■H -r-t 


4-> 


:d 


§ 


CO 


-O CX, O -H Sh 0) 


, — 1 


W)Cn 


CO 




—3 


•H E 5h !-, M 





<D <4-l 


• rH 


a: 


O 


^ 


S uj a. a. a. 


u 


Ci < 


X 


O 
u- 


u- 


O 










UJ 










co 


> 




O .—1 Csl •>* LO 


sO 


h- 00 


c-i 


J 


a: 


§ 


OOOO o 


o 


o o 


o 


< 


UJ 


CT> (Ti CT. C7> CTl 


o> 


CTi CT 


91 




co 

UJ 


< 











19 



o 
o 


O 

o 


o o 
o o 


o 

o 


o 
o 


LO 

CM 


c 
o 
o 


o o 
o o 

CM C 


o 

LO 


to 




to 


a> o 
in cm 


tO 


00 





LO 




P- 


to 




0) 




U 


to 


3 


"*». 


+J 


cm 






Ti 


i 


c 


LO 


tt 


p». 


CX\ 


X 


(H 


m 


\ 




p- 



p» 


LO o o 


CM 


LO 


to O LO 


Tt 


\£5 


vo o r-- 


o 


Tf 


to o to 


CM 


o 


00 O 00 


p- 








Ol 


CM LO CM 


CT> 




rj" r-H 


p- 



c 


vO 


o 


p- 




V. 


■p 


o 


01 


to 






^ 


<C 


IX 


1 


o 


LO 


U 


p» 


CX 


*v. 


IX 


"- 1 




p". 



o 
o 


O 
O 


O 
O 


o o 
o o 


o 
o 


LO 

CM 
CM 


O 
O 
O 


O 
LO 
CM 


o o 

O P- 

O v£> 


LO 




to 


to 
vO 


LO rr 

CM 


CM 



en 


p» 


V 




u 


o 


3 


to 


+-> 




•H 


sO 


X) 


1 


C 


t 


a; 


p* 


ex 


\ 


X 




UJ 


\ 



o 


CM 


LO O O 


Px 


o 


^J" 


o o o 


, ^- 


LO 


to 


rt O LO 


P^ 


Cxi 


O 


CT> O P^ 


Q> 


IN 


CM 


<-t O 00 


^ 












LO 


00 CM LO 


l— 1 




to 


LO tO 


to 













C 


F 










o 


e£ 










X3 


< 
ex 










c 


LU 










o 


a 


£ 


+-> 


in 






+-> 


OS 


c 


0) 




<u 


CO 


UJ 


0J 


<u 


•H 




V) 


<u 


H 


£ 


£ 


H 


to 


C t/> 


h 


< 


■M 


*3 


<D 


<D x) 


<L> 


3= 


0C 


!h 


i— 1 


bO 


CX C 


4-> 




< 


rt 


rt 


rt 


X O 


(3 


act 


ex 


P- 


00 


3= 


LU 03 




o 


UJ 


<D 










LL, 


a 


Q 










00 


os 


?H 


o 


<— < 


CM LO 


^D 


J 


UJ 


<D 


LO 


LO 


LO LO 


LO 


< 


H 


■P 


CTi 


Oi 


o> <j> 


Oi 


H 


< 


rt 










O 


S 


S 










Ei 



20 



WARRANT 
1976 NOTICE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS . 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Lincoln in said County: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify the 
legal voters of said Town of Lincoln qualified to vote in Town Meet- 
ing for the transaction of Town Affairs to meet in the Brooks School 
Auditorium in said Lincoln on Saturday, the twenty-seventh day of 
March next, at 9:30 a.m., then and there to act on the following art- 
icles, except Article 1, and also to meet at the Smith School Gymna- 
sium on Monday, the twenty-ninth day of March next, at 7:30 a.m., 
then and there to act on the following Article 1, by posting a copy 
of this Warrant, by you attested, in said Town, seven days at least 
before the twenty-seventh day of March next. 

The polls for voting the Austrailian ballot on Monday, March twenty- 
ninth, will be opened at 7:30 a.m. and will be closed at 8 p.m. 



ARTICLE 1 . To bring in their votes for one member for each of 
the following offices: 

Town Clerk for one year 
Selectman for three years 
Treasurer for one year 
Assessor for three years 
School Committee member for three years 
Water Commissioner for three years 
Board of Health member for three years 
Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
Planning Board member for five years 
Planning Board member for two years 
Commissioner of Trust Funds for three years 
Trustee of Bemis Fund for three years 

21 



Director of DeCordova £ Dana Museum d, Park for 

four years 
Recreation Committee member for three years 
Tree Warden for one year 

Note: Included as part of the Annual Town Election 
will be an election of two members for three 
years each to the Lincoln-Sudbury Regional 
District Committee 



ARTICLE 2 . To bring in their votes for any committees, commis- 
sioners, trustees, and other officers required by 
law to be elected by ballot or otherwise. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3 . To hear and act upon the reports of Town Officers, 
Committees, Commissioners and Trustees. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 4 . To fix the salaries and compensation of the several 

elective officers of the Town and to determine whether 
any Department, Board or Committee shall be authorized to employ for 
additional compensation any of its members and to fix additional com- 
pensation of such members. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 5 . To raise and appropriate money for the necessary and 

expedient purposes of the Town, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town 

Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, to 
borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1976, in accordance with the provi- 
sions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, as amended, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew 

22 



any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one 
year, in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17, as 
amended. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7 . To see if the Town will authorize the Board of Select- 
men and the School Committee to continue the Town's 
annual contract with the U. S. Commissioners of Education to operate 
the elementary school at L. G. Hanscom Field, Bedford, Massachusetts, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee $ Selectmen 

ARTICLE 8 . To see if the Town will vote to support the School 

Committee in its continuing plan to bring a limited 
number of children from Boston to the Lincoln Schools for purposes 
of education, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 9 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the School 

Committee to transfer funds within the Elementary 
Schools Budget voted under Article 5 of the Warrant for the 1975 
Town Meeting: namely, transfer from line item INSTRUCTION to line 
item OPERATION § MAINTENANCE: provided, however, that the total funds 
so transferred shall not exceed $12,000, and the total expenditures 
shall not exceed the total Elementary Schools Budget so voted under 
said Article 5, or take any other action relative thereto. 

School Committee 



ARTICLE 10 . To see if the Town will vote to abandon a water pipe 

easement granted by deed of Moorfield Storey dated 
November 11, 1897, and recorded with Middlesex South District Regis- 
try of Deeds in Book 2612, Page 488, over his land on the northerly 
side of Trapelo Road, which land is now owned by Rebecca B. Chase and 
The First National Bank of Boston and William M. Rand as Executors 
of the will of Lucy K. Rand, and to authorize the Selectmen to exe- 
cute, acknowledge and deliver in the name and on behalf of the Town 
such deeds and other instruments as they may deem necessary to effect 

23 



such abandonment, or take any other action relative thereto. 

(Said easement was granted in connection with the Old County 
Road between Lincoln and Waltham and since the relocation of 
Trapelo Road is of no further use to the Town.) 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 11 . To see if the Town will vote to join the Minute Man 
Home Care Corporation for the Elderly, a consortium 
of towns in Northwest Suburban Boston, and to raise and appropriate 
the sum of $198 to pay the Town's apportioned share of the operat- 
ing costs of said corporation, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen $ Board of Health 

ARTICLE 12 . To see if the Town will vote to amend the General 

Bylaws of the Town of Lincoln by adding a new Article 
XV entitled "Council on Aging" at the end thereof, said new Article 
XV to read as follows: 

"There shall be established a Council on Aging for 
the purpose of coordinating and carrying out programs 
designed to meet the needs of older citizens, pursu- 
ant to the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 40, 
Section 8B. The Council shall consist of not less 
than nine nor more than twelve residents of this 
Town to be appointed by the Selectmen. Terms shall 
not exceed three (3) years, and shall be staggered 
so that not more than four appointments shall be made 
in any calendar year, except the first year. Offi- 
cers of the Council shall be elected by the Council 
from its membership"; 

and to appropriate a sum of money for the use of said Council, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Board of Selectmen, League of Women Voters 
$ Board of Health 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will amend the vote under Article 
17 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting held on 

24 



March 29, 1975, by increasing the borrowing authorization under said 
vote from $200,000 to $500,000; by adding the following roads to 
those listed in said vote: Pierce Hill Road, Tower Road, Trapelo 
Road, Old County Road, Cedar Road, Upland Field Road, Cambridge 
Turnpike and Beaver Pond Road; by authorizing the Water Commission- 
ers to clean and line mains on Lincoln Road, Sandy Pond Road and 
Bedford Road; by changing the reference to pipe sizes in said vote 
from 8" or 10" mains to not less than 6" but less than 16" mains; 
and by adding to said vote an authorization to the Water Commission- 
ers to accept any grants which may become available from State or 
Federal sources for any of the projects contemplated by said vote, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 14 . To see if the Town will authorize the Water Commis- 
sioners to submit special legislation to the General 
Court whereby borrowings for water system improvements will be ex- 
tended from the present 15-year pay-back period to a 25-year pay- 
back period, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 15 . To see if the Town will raise and appropriate a sum 

of money to enable the Water Commissioners to con- 
struct an addition to the pumping station at Sandy Pond for the 
purpose of providing space for improved chemical mixing facilities, 
or take any other action relative thereto. 

Water Commissioners 

ARTICLE 16 . To see if the Town will vote to construct a transfer 

station on one of the following sites, all of which 
are presently owned by the Town: 

1) present land fill site; 

2) southeast corner of the Baker Bridge field adja- 
cent to the railroad tracks; 

3) west end of the field behind the Fire $ Police 
Station; 

25 



4) Town Barn property; 

and to raise and appropriate a sum of money therefor, and to deter- 
mine whether to provide said sum by taxation, by transfer from avail- 
able funds, by borrowing under the authority of the General Laws, or 
any combination of such methods, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

Selectmen § League of Women Voters 



ARTICLE 17 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
use of the Public Works Department, or take any other action rela- 
tive thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money to lay out and construct bicycle paths, 
(1) partly within the boundaries of Concord Road (Route #126) and 
partly on private lands, from the intersection of said Concord Road 
with South Great Road (Route #117) to the Lincoln-Wayland town line, 
and (2) partly within the boundaries of Trapelo Road and partly on 
private lands, from the intersection of said Trapelo Road with Win- 
ter Street to its intersection with Old County Road, all as shown on 
preliminary plans entitled "Preliminary Plan of a Portion of Concord 
Road with Bicycle Path", and "Preliminary Plan of a Portion of Trap- 
elo Road with Bicycle Path", presently on file with the Town Clerk 
and available for inspection, final versions of said plans suitable 
for recording to be recorded with Middlesex South District Registry 
of Deeds; for said purposes to acquire necessary easements or inter- 
ests in fee by eminent domain, purchase, or any other way, from pri- 
vate owners wherever shown on said plan; and to provide said sum by 
taxation or from free cash or partly from each, all under the author- 
ity of General Laws, Chapter 82, Section 35, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board 



ARTICLE 19 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the purchase of a new Rescue 
Pumper for the Fire Department, or take any other action relative 
thereto. 

By Petition 

26 



ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money for the purchase of a Class 1 Ambu- 
lance for the Town, or take any other action relative thereto. 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to petition the Massa- 
chusetts General Court to enact legislation relative 
to the granting of licenses by the Town for the sale therein of 
wines and malt beverages not to be consumed on the premises by caus- 
ing to be placed on the official Town Ballot to be used for the 
election of officers at the next Annual Town Meeting the following 
question : 

"Shall licenses be granted in the Town of Lincoln 
for the sale therein of wines and malt beverages 
not to be consumed on the premises?" 

By Petition 



ARTICLE 22 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate gifts of 

money and income received from use of conservation 
properties for the maintenance and improvement of conservation pro- 
perties, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 23 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money to carry out a program of tree care, 
including planting along the roadsides and on public lands, pruning, 
spraying, and removal of diseased trees, under the supervision of 
the Town Tree Warden, or take any other action relative thereto. 

Board of Selectmen § Tree Warden 

ARTICLE 24 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board 

of Selectmen to adopt a numbering system for all 
houses in the Town, raise and appropriate a sum of money for the 
implementation of such numbering system, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Planning Board 

27 



ARTICLE 25 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money to repair various portions of the ex- 
terior of the Lincoln Library, including but not limited to repair- 
ing the brick arches on the front of the building, repairing the 
existing slate roof, gutters and flashing, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Library Trustees 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

or transfer from available funds, a sum of money to 
be placed in a separate account in the town treasury, all as author- 
ized by Chapter 911 of the Acts of 1971, to be expended for the 
celebration in the year nineteen hundred and seventy-six of the two 
hundredth anniversary of the American Revolution, or take any other 
action relative thereto. 

Bicentennial Commission 



ART I C LE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 
a sum of money for the construction of two new tennis 
courts adjacent to the existing Town courts, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 



ARTICLE 28 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate 

a sum of money to allow for the installation of lights 
at the existing Town tennis courts, as well as at the two new courts 
proposed in Article 27 of the Warrant for this Town Meeting, provid- 
ing that said Article 27 is approved by the Town Meeting, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Recreation Committee 



ARTICLE 29 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 
way the private road known as Mine Brook Road from 
Trapelo Road to and including the turnaround, as shown on a plan 
entitled "Subdivision of Land in Lincoln, Mass., belonging to James 
DeNormandie, et al", dated June, 1970, by Rowland H. Barnes Co, Inc. 
Civil Engineers, approved by the Planning Board of the Town of 

28 



Lincoln on August 5, 1970, and recorded in the South Middlesex Dis- 
trict Registry of Deeds as Plan #975 of 1970, and that for this pur- 
pose will authorize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent 
domain, purchase, or otherwise, the land contained therein, or take 
any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 30 . To see if the Town will vote to accept as a public 

way the private road known as Orchard Lane from the 
Cambridge Turnpike to and including the turnaround, as shown on a 
plan entitled "Subdivision Plan of Land in Lincoln, Mass. Owned by 
the Trustees of the Rural Land Foundation of Lincoln", dated Febru- 
ary 6, 1974, and revised July 3, 1974, by Cleverdon, Varney £ Pike, 
Engineers, approved by the Planning Board of the Town of Lincoln on 
July 24, 1974, and recorded in the South Middlesex District Registry 
of Deeds as Plan #1207 of 1974, and that for this purpose will auth- 
orize the Board of Selectmen to acquire by eminent domain, purchase, 
or otherwise, the land contained therein, or take any other action 
relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



ARTICLE 31 . To see if the Town will vote to appropriate any sums 

received from the Federal or State governments on 
account of the cost of acquisition of land for conservation purposes 
to the payment of debt incurred by the Town for such acquisition, or 
take any other action relative thereto. 

Selectmen 



Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant with your doings 
thereon to the Town Clerk, at or before the time for the meeting 
aforesaid. Given under our hands this twenty-third day of February 
in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and seventy-six. 

Robert M. Gargill 
John B. Garrison 
Harold A. Levey, Jr. 

SELECTMEN OF LINCOLN 
29 



tf> 



<^<\